Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 6411/Phi – All at sixes and sevens?

Posted by bensand on May 4th, 2007

bensand.

A satisfying and well-worked crossword although there are a couple I’m looking for further explanation on. Very unusually for me I spotted a nina in the unchecked letters on the middle column and middle row.

The middle row gives s i x x i s and the middle columns gives s e v e n s.  The answers running alongside these middle rows and columns are the four six letter answers and the four seven letter answers. Maybe there’s more I haven’t worked out?

Across
1 NUMB – NU(M)B
10 UNDER THE COUNTER – (THEN RUDE)* + COUNTER
11 OBSESSIVE – (BOSSES)* + IVE
12 EGAD – ? Not 100% on this. Has AGE <= for recalled period and D for Damn but I’m not sure really
19 CURETTE – CUR(E) + (B)ETTE(R), took me a while to come up with this explanation but I’m happy with this one now
20 GOBI – I BOG <=
24 TAKE IT ON THE CHIN
26 WELL – My = WELL as an exclamation, also WELL is a source
 
Down
1 NEUROSES – NEU, I assume, is new in German + ROSES
2 MIDAS – IM <= SAD<=, great defintion
4 TICKETS – T(H)ICKETS, last one I got, not quite sure why now I look at it
5 NOUVEAUX RICHES – (VAIN EXCUSE HOUR)*
8 CROSS EXAMINING – CROSS + AXE <= + MINING
9 RHEIMS – R(HE)IMS
14 AIR POCKET – CD I’ve seen something very similar to this recently but I can’t remember where
18 SET DOWN – Double definition
19 CANUTE – C(AN)UTE
22 OCHRE – An instant to solve (given letters), longer to explain. It’s CHORE with the O moved to the top
23 OTTO – OTT + O, Otto gets around, he was 23D in the Guardian yesterday

6 Responses to “Independent 6411/Phi – All at sixes and sevens?”

  1. says:

    SIXes and SEVENS was a nice touch. Yes, NEU is new in German, can’t recall seeing it used in a cryptic before.

  2. says:

    EGAD Could be wrong but in old books when damn would not be printed (a long time ago!) it used just say D—

  3. says:

    19A: I thought Canute actually existed, in which case how is he an allegorical monarch? The story about him and the tides is more apocryphal than allegorical.

    26A: this slowed me down, since I confidently entered MINE, which is I think possible (“Mine host”).

    Still can’t see why 12A is EGAD, if indeed it is, and 17A is I think TRIALS but can’t really justify it.

  4. says:

    17A is Greats. A homophone for grates and a term for Classics at Oxford (more or less)

    MINE does seem plausible, I had letters by the time I looked at 26A so didn’t happen to go down that path.

  5. says:

    Nmsindy’s explanation for D = damn is correct, making 12Ac an & lit.: AGE (rev.) + D.

  6. says:

    I thought the sixes and sevens next to the words of that length was a nice touch, and only wish I’d spotted it myself…

    Gilbert and Sullivan fans will recall that Captain Corcoran in HMS Pinafore would ‘never use a big bad D’ (What, never? No, never), although in Act 2 he does let one slip, with the chorus murmuring ‘Did you hear him? He said damme’ antiphonally.

    Canute is an allegorical monarch because he is a monarch whose story (however apocryphal) is used allegorically.

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