Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 6741/Nimrod

Posted by neildubya on May 30th, 2008

neildubya.

 Ran into a brick wall about halfway through this one and then spotted the Nina (referenced in 9), which got things moving again. Still don’t understand a few things here and there though.

Across
1 (HAS)* in HU[-b]BY – HUSHABY. Think I’ve parsed that correctly, with the definition being “at Bedtime song”.
5 US,(INTO)*,V – Peter USTINOV.
10 AC,I,DRAIN
12 PEON[-y] – a farm labourer in Latin America.
13 AMEN CORNER – a bit before my time but I had heard of AMEN CORNER (the band) as I remember my Dad introducing me to “Wide-eyed and legless”, a song by their former lead singer Andy Fairweather-Low. It’s also holes 11, 12 and 13 on the Augusta golf course.
14 hidden in “tiPSY CHOreographer”
16 O TO Z in PROA – “the last dozen characters” is O TO Z and PROA has come up twice in recent puzzles, which definitely helped me.
17 AS in IN VAIN – not sure what “bit by bit” is doing…?
20 BELIEF – not sure how this one works: “Credit what S used to do in a bygone age”. I filled it in because it fit with the definition and the Nina.
22 (ANGRILY SIT)* – LARYNGITIS.
25 (BAR YOU)* – YORUBA.
27 GESTE in ED
 
Down
2 UNCLE[-an] – no, I don’t know why UNCLE is slang for “pawnbroker” either.
3 hidden in “perisHED ON ICy” – I think “shores” works really well as the hidden indicator here.
6 SIROCCO – can’t work out this one either, apart from the definition: “Very good 70s pop band holding right to break wind”. Ker-razy surface reading.
8 ON THE NOSE – why “offensive to Aussies”?
9 ONCE UPON A TIME – “Fairytale start” and (4,4,1,4) got this for me but it was a while before I spotted what the rest of the clue was about. If you’re still in the dark, look at the 1st and 15th columns.
15 (GANGLIONS)* – SINGALONG.
18 A,Y L in SUMS
21 LOWBROW – can’t work out this one either: “Thicko out on a limb collecting zero wickets and run out”.

12 Responses to “Independent 6741/Nimrod”

  1. R D Anderson says:

    21D: Dicky Bird would spot this one: LBW (out on a limb – clever) evenly spaced with OW (no wickets) and RO (run out)

  2. R D Anderson says:

    Just spotted 20A: belie + F (old way of writing S)

  3. beermagnet says:

    21D LOWBROW is LBW “out on a limb” with OW for “zero wickets” and RO for “run out” inside (“collecting”).

    Can’t help with 6D or 20A though, and I don’t fully understand 11A: Deny American Indian whistle-blower entered first (6) REFUTE
    The whistle-blower is REF I guess and entered first is E maybe, but how does American Indian give the UT?

    This really was very tough but enjoyable once the Nina was spotted.

  4. nmsindy says:

    SIROCCO 10CC is the 70s band.

  5. nmsindy says:

    11 UTE = Indian REF entered first i.e. before UTE

  6. beermagnet says:

    Ta Nms, I hadn’t heard of the Ute tribe which I now find is why Utah is so called.

    6D If 10cc is the band where does the initial S and the final O come from? Is it indicated by “Very good”?

    Looks like the other one that Neil had a query on is 8D, and I too can find no evidence for “On the nose” in the BO sense being a peculiarly Australian phrase.

  7. eimi says:

    Re: On the nose. My Collins, Chambers and COED all give that particular definition as being Australian or Australian/NZ.

  8. nmsindy says:

    Yes, Beermagnet, ‘very good’ = so, I’ve seen that quite often.
    Cleverly constructed to give the misleading join in “to break/wind”.
    Liked the idea used in this puzzle.

  9. C G Rishikesh says:

    Re 17ac:
    I see the anno as INVA(S)I(O)N
    SO in IN VAIN
    By ‘bit by bit’ the clue writer seems to suggest that SO does not go in as a whole.

  10. Keith says:

    out on a limb = lbw, collecting, zero wickets(ow)and run out(ro)

  11. Andrew says:

    UNCLE is a pretty well-known slang term for a pawnbroker – there’s a discussion of this clue over at rec.puzzles.crosswords.

  12. Andrew says:

    Oops – that thread is actually about a Times clue, where “Uncle” is the definition and PAWNBROKER the answer. Still, it goes to prove my assertion about it being “well-known”.

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