Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Guardian, 24447/Araucaria – In hot water

Posted by Ciaran McNulty on July 22nd, 2008

Ciaran McNulty.

Araucaria as the setter for my first blog was a bit intimidating, but once the long clues around the edge were solved the middle opened up. Getting 1A in particular fairly quickly was a morale booster.

Key:
dd = double definition
cd = cryptic definition
* = anagram
< = reverse

Across
1 GO OFF AT A TANGENT GOOF FAT A TAN GENT
9 TROUT FARM Presumably TR is trawl, OUT FAR + M
10 BY GUM cd
11 NORTHAM ROTHMAN* – a small town in Devon
12 OIL BATH OATH around 1 LB
13 ALL AND SUNDRY A LAUNDRY with A replaced by LANDS
14 OPPRESS OP + PRESS
17 ADDED UP DEAD* + <PUD
19 OUTLINE dd
22 EYE DROP dd with a cd second def. Not sure of the Shakespeare reference
25 WOOSTER WOOER around ST, character from PG Woodhouse’s “Jeeves and Wooster” books
26 GAGSTER GANGSTER – N
28 THING THIN ‘G’
29 CLOSENESS CLONES about SE + S. ‘initiate such’=S is a new one on me but makes sense.
30 RESURRECTION MAN NONUCRIMEARREST*. Slang for a body-snatcher, as in Burke and Hare
Down
1 GET INTO HOT WATER straightforward cd
2 ODOUR ODO is an old bishop and UR is an old city. Saintly relics sometimes smell sweet, which is taken as a sign of their holiness.
3 FITCHEE ITCH in FEE. A heraldic term meaning ‘pointed’.
4 TRAUMAS SUMATRA*
5 TOMBOLA TOM + “BOWLER”
6 NOBBLED NOB + BLED
7 ENGLANDER cd
8 TOM THE PIPER’S SON Got it from the letters and the first part of the clue, haven’t worked out the wordplay
15 PETRONIUS INPOSTURE*
20 INTEGER Not sure how this is ‘in between’?
21 EARACHE E + ARACHNE – N
22 EDGE OUT ED + GOUT around E
23 EL GRECO ELGAR – A + (Umberto) ECO
27 THERM THE + RM

13 Responses to “Guardian, 24447/Araucaria – In hot water”

  1. conradcork says:

    9 across. Tr is some trawl.

    Typo at 26. Should be gagster.

  2. Andrew says:

    20dn – it’s EG (=say) in INTER (=between). “Say” seems to be doing double duty here – it’s also being used to say that 1 and 2 are examples of integers.

    22ac – “eye-drop” is used by Shakespeare to mean “tear” in Henry IV part 2 (thanks to Mr Google for this)

    7dn – I didn’t get the significance of “if used”.

    In general I found this puzzle very easy indeed – even when the answers were obscure to me (FITCHEE and NORTHAM), or where the wordplay took some working out, there was enough information in other parts of the clue. As you say, getting an easy long 1 across is always a good start.

  3. Matthew says:

    22 down: Accoring to Chambers, tear is a Shakespearean meaning of “eye-drop”.

    8 down is (MOTHERS POET SPIN)*

    I suppose that 20 down in meant to be EG in INTER, but I really think that “say” is a necessary part of the definition.

  4. Ciaran McNulty says:

    Andrew, if the term ‘englander’ is used in a sentence it can be ‘little’ or ‘new’ ?

    Thanks for the explanation of INTEGER – I hadn’t spotted that ‘say’ was part of the wordplay.

  5. harry says:

    unusually for Auracaria a couple of nitpicks – 7dn – “one of us”, well I’m Scottish, and 30ac – Burke and Hare were murderers, not resurrectionists, they killed their victims, rather than dig them up

  6. John H says:

    According to Wikipedia, Burke and Hare started as resurrection men but rapidly moved on to murder.

  7. Dave Ellison says:

    I am English and have lived in Scotland for the last 26 years, and Harry’s sentiment occurred to me as I filled in 7d. However, I thought perhaps the “if used” was added to cover non-English solvers, but couldn’t quite work it out.

    I also thought this was a very easy Araucaria, finishing it in about 17 minutes, a PB.

  8. Jim says:

    Harry, even a Scotsman is presumably a member of the UK and therefor “one of us”…so, no griping please from Scotland, Wales or N. Ireland. I, as a Yank, however, take umbrage!

  9. golgonooza says:

    I enjoyed this one! Fairly simple as people say. I thought 8dn was interesting having the wordplay in the middle and the definition at both ends – ie Tom was a pipers son and a pig nicker.
    30ac seems to me further confirmation that Araucaria is a bit of a reader of Crime fiction – especially the novels of Ian Rankin – he’s referred to him before in his clues. I think Ian Rankin is also a fan of Araucaria’s crosswords!

  10. Mart says:

    Good crossie today – some easy, a couple of obscurities, the rest somewhere inbetween, and just about finishable for a novice like me (with a bit of web help). Araucaria is usually too hard, but today’s was pitched just right.

  11. Kalowski says:

    7d should not be “offensive”. The little or new Englander is the one doing the talking. It’s not one of us (solvers), it’s one of us Englanders could be little or new

  12. JimboNWUK says:

    In 7d I assumed that the “if used” meant “if US’d” – i.e if used in America – the Englander would be ‘New’ as a New Englander is an inhabitant of one of the NE coastal ‘New England’ states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island or Connecticut. I was also amused to wonder if ol’ MonkeyPuzzle was accusing the Guardian readership of being insular “Little Englanders” who want no truck with, for example, the EU.

  13. Chris says:

    Jim, being part of the UK does not make you an Englander! Being from England makes you an Englander, and that’s only one bit of the UK.

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