Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Financial Times 13,027 / Jason

Posted by Agentzero on March 17th, 2009

Agentzero.

Two slightly tricky clues exploiting the is=’s=s ambiguity.  I am unsure of the parsing of two others–any assistance is welcome! Thanks to Phi and Paul B for their help, noted below

Across
1 LANDLORD L (left) AND (with) LORD (peer) 
6 APACHE A ACHE (a pine) around P (head of Punjabi)
9 FACILE FILE (catalogue) containing AC (account)
10 FLAGSHIP FLAGS (gets worn out) before HIP (joint)
11 DENY DEN (study) Y (yard)
12 CONCLUSION *(on councils)
14 PLEASANT L (Liberal) in PEASANT (bumpkin)
16 ALLY SALLY (go out) without the S (son)
18 SWAT reversal of TAWS (marbles)
19 APERITIF A (adult) + *(TRIPE) + IF (“despite being;” as in “the weather was pleasant, if somewhat chilly”) 
21 FORECASTLE *(FLEET plus OSCAR)
22 GASH dd
24 MECHANIC ME (Jason) CHAN (Jackie, of Shanghai Noon and many other films) IC (in charge)
26 VIOLET VIOLENT (rampant) without the N (“end of maturation”)
27 LYCEUM *(my clue)
28 ENSEMBLE hidden answer
 
Down
2 AGAPE A GAPE (GAPE as a noun, meaning a wide open mouth).  Having the initial “a” and the final”e”, I was all ready to write in “adore,” but instead it is the Greek word for spiritual love
3 DAIRY CATTLE These are certainly “milkers,” but I can’t work out the cryptic part.  Is RIAD a Welsh name, such that “Welshman upset over unknown” gives DAIR + Y?  And in that case CATTLE = colt? As explained by Phi and Paul B, this is DAI (Welsh diminutive for “Dafydd,” i.e., David) + Y, C in RATTLE (upset).
4 OVERCOAT OVER (finished) C (cold) OAT (cereal)
5 DEFINITE ARTICLE dd
6 ARABLE PARABLE (story) without the P (page)
7 ASS AS (like) + S (southern)
8 HOI POLLOI Shouldn’t a dd involve two different senses of the same word?  I don’t really think this does
13 SHAVING FOAM ‘S HAVING FOAM (“is experiencing surf”).
15 LOW COMEDY W (wife) in LOCO MED (crazy sea) Y (ending in “funny”)
17 RESERVES RE (on) SERVES (tennis openings)
20 BARNUM BUM (tramp) around A RN (a fleet).  Phineas T. Barnum, who apparently did not say “there’s a sucker born every minute”
23 SHELL S (‘s) HELL (a terrible place)
25 HUE I am unsure about this one as well.  The definition would be “aspect;” I think in the cryptic part of the clue we are being told to remove (“obscure”) O (old) and S (beginning to story) in HOUSE (college).  Confirmed by Paul B in comment #3 below, but as he notes, to make the cryptic grammar work, “obscure” should be read as “hidden”

4 Responses to “Financial Times 13,027 / Jason”

  1. Phi says:

    Not having seen the puzzle I can’t do other than guess 3d’s clue, but if it contains ‘Welshman upset over unknown colt’ then I’d say it was Y (unknown) C (colt) in DAI RATTLE (Welshman upset). I don’t like that use of ‘over’ – ‘about’ would do in the reconstructed version I produced. I cannot see how ‘milkers’ fits in with that version, though, and perhaps knowing that would explain why ‘over’ was chosen.

  2. Paul B says:

    Phi, it’s ‘Milkers Welshman upset over unknown colt’, and so DAI+R(Y/C)ATTLE as you suggest.

  3. Paul B says:

    ‘Obscure old beginning to story in college’s aspect’ = H o U s E, but for the cryptic reading to work, we’d need the adjectival use for ‘obscure’.

    Speaking of which, I can only find ‘house’ as part of a college, or the pupils in it, in Collins. Chambers is the same but for Aedes Christi – The House (of Christ). I have to confess I was not aware of that connection.

  4. Agentzero says:

    Phi and Paul B, thanks to you both.

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