Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Inquisitor 137 – No Yens by Schadenfreude

Posted by kenmac on August 21st, 2009

kenmac.

This has to be one of the toughest Inquisitors I have ever tackled. I think I have the grid correct though I’m not sure about some of the thematic material. Solving time: several days :(

The first letters of extra words read in order followed by the last letters of the same words led to: THE PASSIONATE HEART OF THE POET IS WHIRLED MAUD.

The line THE PASSIONATE HEART OF THE POET IS WHIRLED (into folly and vice) is from the poem MAUD by Alfred Lord Tennyson.

We were told that 20 answers contained an extra word and all others were thematically treated. A quick tour of the grid and clues showed me that most answers wouldn’t fit and that there were only 20 answers that did fit; further investigation showed that all other grid entries were shorter than the answer by exactly 2 letters. Thus thematic entries are all poets and had to have their hearts “whirled” to create real words. Some of the answers, clued without definition, were indicated by a star (*) and I have reproduced the star in the tables below.

The title is an anagram of (T)ENNYSO(N). Rather unusually there were a few grid entries with more than one clue.

Across
No. Entry Poet/Extra word First
Letter
Last
Letter
Wordplay
*1 GOVERN CONGREVE CON
(learn)+G(erman)+REV(ise)+E(nglish)
5 CHARRED

TOAST

T T CHAR
(cleaner)+RED (=REDE =clean  up)
*11 LAER VALERY V
(see)+ALE (porter)+RY (railway)
13 ARREEDE

HOLOGRAPH

H H E(nglish)+READER
(anag) – ARREEDE = archaic word for interpret
14 ERRANT BERTRAND BERNHARDT-H(enry)
(anag) – BERTRANDT Russell
15 GRICES

EAGLE

E E GR(ey)+ICES
(kills) – GRICE = young pig
*16 EVIL DELVIG GOD-O+EVIL
(anag) I wasn’t comfortable with the fact that the grid entry appeared
in the clue.
*18 NOTE FENTON FENT
(crack)+ON
*20 TOUCHIER THEOCRITUS TIT+US+CHORE
(anag)
22 SAHIB

POP

P P BI+HAS
(reversed) – SAHIB = Indian word for European. This was a great clue
that misled me for ages; I thought it was an anagram of
AC/DC+E(uropean) – DECCA and I spent ages trying to justify DECCA =
POP, knowing that DECCA ia a “pop” record label.
24 TATE PATTEN PATTE
(narrow band)+N(ew)
25 REGO GEORGE OR (gold)
inside GE (goddess)+EG (reversed)
25 - ‘ ‘ - ROGERS ?? GORSE+R(un)
(anag) – this seems to be right but I couldn’t find a poet called
ROGERS :-(
26 SONIC

AUDIO

A O SON
(product!)+IC (I see)
28 SALT

SOME

S E  Double
definition; SALT = old word for “in heat”
31 TORE BRETON BR(itish)+ETON
(school)
31 - ‘ ‘ - PORTER PORT (left
on ship)+ER (QE2)
34 RAITA MARTIAL MARITAL
(husband) with IT (sex appeal) reversed
*35 KNITWEAR DRINKWATER DARK
WINTER (anag)
36 TEAM

SHOT

S T MATE
(anag) – TEAM = string of flying ducks
40 GETA

ISRAELI

I

I

GET
(acquire)+A(merican)
43 TANACH

OFFICERS

O S TANNA
(Indian police station – nick)+CH(urch) Another great clue, really made
me chuckle.
*44 NAILER VERLAINE LIAM
NEVER-M(oney) (anag)
45 EMIRATE

NEW

N W EMI
(record label)+RATE (to assess)
*46 YONI BINYON Hidden
word: joB IN
YONne
47 RESORTS

AMISH

A H RE
(of)+SORTS (Australian slang for women, apparently)
*48 DUBBIN ? No idea –
I just could not see it. RUB+something????
7

Down
No. Entry Poet/Extra word First
Letter
Last
Letter
Wordplay
*1 GLEANER WERGELAND WERG (grew
(rev))+ELAND (antelope)
2 VERA CARVER R(uns)
inside CAVER
2 -
‘ ‘ -
GRAVES GRAVE
(serious)+S(econd) – GRAVES = a French wine
2 -
‘ ‘ -
NERVAL RAVENS+L(ength)
(anag) – NERVAL = of sensitive fibres
3 RENVOIS

TERMINI

T I OVER+IN
(anag)+S(quare)
4 NOT-I

EXTERIOR

E R Two-thirds
of NOTI(ce) (poet’s mind.) Not really sure about the wordplay here;
mind seems to be an obsolete word for notice, not as far as I can see,
poetic.
5 CARLOT

HOPEFUL

H L HARLOT
(tart) with C(ocaine) instead of H(eroin) – CARLOT = peasant (according
to Shakespeare)
*6 ARRECT ? No ideas
on this one.  ARRECT was the only word that would fit towards the
end.
? Most
likely an anagram of BRAIN+E(cstasy) but I couldn’t find a poet to fit.
:-(
*8 RECLINATE MAETERLINCK CLEMENT
AIR+K(ing) (anag)
*9 EDEN MENDES MEN+SED
(rev) – SED = John Milton’s spelling of said
10 DESIRE

EVOCATIVE

E E DE (of in
French)+SIRE (to father)
12 ARGO ? No idea :-(
*12 -
‘ ‘ -
TAGORE TAG
(moral)+ORE (tangle:seaweed)
17 QUAIR MARQUIS R (king)
inside MAQUIS (French guerrillas)
*19 TAGLIONIS ? Probably
an anagram of CASTLE IN I GO – stumped :-(
21 ELLA WALLER W(ith)+ALL+RE
(rev)
*22 SEEN JENSEN J(ack)+SEEN
(anag)+N(avy)  Like 16a) I wasn’t too happy
about the answer appearing in the clue.
*23 BOREL HOLBERG HOL(Y)+BERG
27 CATTABU

ANGERED

A D CA
(about)+T(ime)+TABU (ban) – a cattabu is a cross bred domestic cattle
and a zebu. I’d never heard of either cattabu or zebu.
*29 TAMARIN LAMARTINE LA
(see)+MART+IN+E (Spain)
30 SKATER

RACISM

R M TAKES
(anag)+R(ule) – Christopher Dean was a skater, one half of Torville and
Dean.
32 OWL-CAR

TULSA

T A L(eft)+WO
(without) (rev)+CAR (Charles)
33 EAGLES

ORMOLU

O U E
(base)+AG (silver)+LES (the French)
*37 AMEN HEMANS H(ard)+(L)E
MANS
38 WAME NEWMAN NEW
(young)+MAN (chess piece) – reference to the late Paul Newman
*39 TARO WARTON NOT+RAW
(crude) (rev)
41 ENID SIDNEY DINES
(anag)+Y (wye) – reference to Sidney Poiter
42 BLOB

FLOOD

F D L(eft)
inside BOB (dock)

11 Responses to “Inquisitor 137 – No Yens by Schadenfreude”

  1. Duncan Shiell says:

    I too think this was the hardest Inquisitor I have ever done. The grid is a brilliant piece of construction being built up from so many different poets, each of whom can generate a real word from an anagram of all but their first and last letters.

    I think I can help with your queries.

    48 across – the clue answer is SANDBURG – SAND (polish) + BURG (walled town) leading to DURBAN as the entry.

    4 down – NOT-I is two thirds of NOTION which has apparently been used by both Shakespeare and Milton to refere to the mind.

    6 down – the clue answer is PETRARCH – PET (favourite) + RACH (hunting dog) containing R (river)

    7 down – I think the poet is BERNIA (obscure Italian poet?), leading to REIN as the entry.

    12 down (1) – the clue answer is (Louis) ARAGON, mentioned in Wikipedia as a surrealist author and poet.

    19 down – I have the poet as CASTIGLIONE, as you say an anagram.

    Like you, it took me a number of days to crack this with a fair amount of research to track down many of the poets. It was very satisfying to complete it though.

  2. kenmac says:

    Thanks Duncan,

    I was kicking myself that I forgot to post my entry but since finding out that I had 48a) wrong, I’m glad I saved myself the cost of a stamp.

  3. Colin Blackburn says:

    I’d concur on the difficulty. I found the quote, cracked the theme and then after failing to work out a couple more poets I decided to move on leaving it unfinished. I’m certainly glad I didn’t have to blog this one.
    I felt the wholly anagrammed poets were unfair since letters in the grid provided little help to the actual poet. Had all the poets been in, say, Bradford’s or had all the wordplays been more charade-like the puzzle might have been fairer. I suppose the bottom line is that you didn’t need to find the poets to complete the puzzle but that reduced parts of the puzzle to simply pattern-matching with TEA.
    I agree the grid construction was masterful.

  4. Mike Laws says:

    All the poets are in the current edition of Chambers Biographical Dictionary – I can always be sure that Schadenfreude puzzles can be checked by reference to books, because he doesn’t have (and doesn’t want) an internet connection, not even for email. He sends his submissions on CDs by post.

    In case anyone’s wondering why there have been two of his puzzles in such quick succession, it was the 200th anniversary of Tennyson’s birth on 6th August, two days before the puzzle appeared.

  5. Dave Hennings says:

    I agree pretty much 100% with Colin, including the “not my blog, thank god”! I gave up with four answers unsolved, including WERGELAND, despite considering WERG and ELAND but not believing the two would go together! In the end I spent far too long on it and ran out of posting time. I’m very glad it wasn’t a Listener.

  6. nmsindy says:

    Re comment 1, that poet ARAGON is the pseudonym of a distinguished Listener setter, who also sets 15X15 puzzles for the Times and Indy (as Bannsider).

  7. nmsindy says:

    Re comments 3 and 4, Bradford’s is an excellent book, well-thumbed by yours truly as needed. But I’d always have regarded it as a secondary source, with info needing to be verified elsewhere if necessary.

  8. Colin Blackburn says:

    Re #7. I agree that Bradford’s isn’t, and shouldn’t be, a primary source. However, when solving a puzzle like this one having a list (whether Bradford’s, Chambers Lists, Newnes,…) is more useful than guessing 10 letter anagrams and searching through a biographical dictionary.

  9. HolyGhost says:

    What a stinker!
    I had the second poet at 25d as Samuel Rogers (1763-1855), English poet – according to Wikipedia.
    And I failed to find a reference for Duncan’s suggestion of BERNIA at 7d, although agreeing that the entry must be REIN.

  10. Peter Mabey says:

    I did eventually fill the grid (not before deadline, though) having identified all the poets but Delvig and Bernia. The latter was particularly obscure, as almost everyone gives his name as Berni.

  11. erwinh says:

    Another late comment but another cracking addition to the IQ series. However, I did have some reservations. While it was certainly a challenge to complete, I did not find it difficult in the usual sense of the word. The quotation and source were readily found so the required thematic entry of the poets posed few problems. The difficulty came in finding some of those poets.

    Despite discovering that they were all appearing in my copy of Chambers Biographical Dictionary (7th ed) and completing the puzzle correctly, I never found Delvig (16ac), Wergeland (1dn) or Mendes (9dn). Schadenfreude may well have a profound knowledge of poetry, I would not put it past him, but if he really does shun the Internet then my inference is that he trawled through CBD from cover to cover picking out all the poets. Some, such as Nerval and Mendes, were better known as writers so the full entry needed to be read. It must have been a heroic if laborious business. The trouble is that we as solvers had to go through much the same process.

    I especially liked the four incidences of multiple clues although before I twigged the theme I had the wrong answer for the second 2dn:

    Serious second wine (6) morose – MO + ROSE should have been Graves – GRAVE + S

    Not so likeable were the two cases of grid entries that were also found in clues: evil (16ac) and seen (22dn). This is normally seen as anathema in crosswords so time was wasted on trying to fit alternatives.

    However, forget the quibbles, this was a puzzle that I doubt I shall ever forget.

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