Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Financial Times 13,202 / Bradman

Posted by Gaufrid on October 9th, 2009

Gaufrid.

Here is a belated analysis of yesterday’s puzzle.  Apologies for the delay but I didn’t notice that the scheduled blogger had gone AWOL until this morning.

I found this a most enjoyable puzzle with some very entertaining and amusing clues. 15d deserves a special mention despite the misprint (willl) and several others are not far behind.

Across
9 TOOTHSOME  TOO (excessively) *(HOST) ME (this person) 
10 BRAVE  BRA (piece of underwear) VE[x] (tease with kiss denied)
11 OTTOMAN  OTTO (fragrant oil) MAN (chap)
12 TANGOED  *(GONE) in TAD (a bit)
13 ERR  hidden in ‘naughtiER Rector’
14 EXTRADITION  EX (abandoned) TRADITION (custom)
17,18,19 CHEAP AND NASTY  *(PAD TENANCY HAS)
21 GIANT PANDAS  *(STAND IN A GAP)
23 MAC  CAM (river) reversed
25 THAW OUT  = *(WHAT)
27 SCHOLAR  CH (central heating) in SOLAR (old-fashioned upper room)
28 TRENT  R[ise] in TENT (part of camp)
29 NEUTRINOS  *(OUR TENNIS)

Down
1 STROKE  dd
2 NOCTURNE  homophone of ‘knock turn’
3 CHAMBER POT  MBE (honoured person) RPO (orchestra) in CHAT (talk) – a cheeky definition!
4 BONN  BONN[e] (beautiful falling short)
5 LEFT-HANDED  cd
6 EBON  hidden in ‘thE BONhomie’
7 SATORI  SA (it) TOR (hill) I (island)
8 READ-ONLY  A DON (a fellow) in RELY (bank)
15 TEA TASTING  TEAT (milk supplier) A STING (smart)
16 IONOSPHERE  *(POISON) HERE (in this place)
17 COGITATE  I (one) in *(COTTAGE)
20 SAMPLING  SAMP (porridge) LING (fish)
22 AMAZED  A MAZE (feature of Hampton Court) D (daughter)
24 CERISE  IS in CERE[mony] (formal occasion half way through)
26 ORTS  [s]O[c]R[a]T[e]S
27 SOUP  SOUP[con] (dash – prisoner has escaped)

One Response to “Financial Times 13,202 / Bradman”

  1. Sil van den Hoek says:

    Thank you for the blog, Gaufrid.
    I liked this crossword very much, very precise and faultless.
    I think, more people – especially Guardian solvers – should from time to time
    take a look at the FT crosswords, as so many setters publish in both papers
    (like Bradman/Pasquale).
    And since the prints are perfectly alright (thanks to Uncle Yap), that can’t be a drawback either any more.

    Anyway, the only solution I didn’t find was THAW OUT, a clever “reversed anagram” – something that we see more and more.
    In 4dn, I think, it should be BONN[y].
    (By the way, I first had ‘Rome’ as ‘Rome[o]‘)

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