Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 7195/Phi

Posted by John on November 6th, 2009

John.

The usual very pleasant offering from Phi. One or two I’m not quite clear about, but that will be me not him I’m pretty sure.

Across
7 BI(R)D LIME
9 appaREL IS Hard
10 STE(E)P
11 DEMO{li}TION
12 PRIVATE PAT(1)ENT
15 LO(LL)OP
16 MOR{e} ALE
18 ALPES-MARITIMES — (seems impartial)* — there’s no acute accent in the online version, but perhaps there’s one in the paper
20 S(MOULD)ER
22 maIN DIAgonal
24 AN O(RA)K
25 R(EG 1 C)IDE — I suppose it’s ‘serious’ in the sense ‘major’
 
Down
1 MINSTREL — an unusual clue I think but good — ‘minster’ has its last two letters, which are ER (Queen), reversed, then {recita}l
2 {s}IDLE
3 SEND-UP — I’m not comfortable here: OK despatch = send, but how does pilot = up, except in the vague sense that a pilot is up in the air?
4 B RUM
5 GLITTERATI — litter in (1 tag)rev.
6 E-S(C)ORT — the Ford Escort
8 IMPETUOUS — (I am to use up)* — ‘supply’ is an adverb
13 VOL UP TU {v}ARY
14 TWO-TIMING — (owt)rev. Tim in g
17 EYE C AND Y
18 ALMOND — (old man)*
19 AU (R) OR A
21 DU(K)E
23 DOCK — 2 defs I think, ‘cut’ and ‘service provided by port’

7 Responses to “Independent 7195/Phi”

  1. Paul B says:

    SEND-UP has the old question-mark alert, John.

    If you were to despatch a pilot, would you perhaps send her up (into the sky)? That’s what m’colleague is nudging at here methinks, thereby achieving a good match-up twixt the SI and the (slighly cryptic) def.

    Nice blog, nice puzzle.

  2. mhl says:

    Thanks for the post, John, and in particular for explaining the wordplay in TWO-TIMING. Is the definition meant to be “without scruple”? A good fun puzzle as usual for Friday, anyway.

  3. Mick H says:

    John, if you mean the acute accent in département, I don’t think this applies, as the clue uses the English translation of it – department. Otherwise it would need two Es as well as an accent, which would’ve really wrecked the surface reading!

  4. Roger P says:

    Re SEND-UP. Just to split a hair or two. The straight clue must be “take-off”, a noun and synomym of the hyphenated solution “send-up”, also a noun. “Despatch a pilot” is a verb phrase, whose synonym would be “send up” with no hyphen.

  5. eimi says:

    In a double definition clue there may well be different enumerations for each part, but by convention only one can be given. See perse/per se yesterday.

  6. nmsindy says:

    Very enjoyable puzzle from Phi with MINSTREL my last answer.

  7. John says:

    Thanks for tidying me up as usual on one or two points: yes of course Mick H, he couldn’t have used the French word for department as that would indeed have made the wordplay hopeless, and yes Roger P of course it’s simply ‘send up?’ for ‘despatch a pilot’.

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