Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 7235 by Dac

Posted by nmsindy on December 23rd, 2009

nmsindy.

A puzzle which I found a mixture of very easy and quite difficult clues, solving time 30 mins.   Great stuff as always from Dac.

* = anagram  < = reversed

ACROSS

1 RESIGNED     Good double definition

5 GAMBIT    Hidden

10 DO A ROARING TRADE    Cryptic definition

11 S (TROP)PY    port (left)<

12 EM (PER) OR     rep in Rome all<       rep = reputation informally,  Collins confirms

13 BAR RACKS

15 YA (RN) S    say<

18 I S (first letters) SUE   (EU’s)<

20 CATARACT   Double definition

23 TOPICAL    (coal pit)*

25 MANIPLE    Double definition   (ornamental band and also group of 120 Roman soldiers)

26 GARDEN FURNITURE  (ruined turf – anger)*     Not much in use today, in this part of the world anyway.

27 TANNER    Double definition – sixpence in pre-decimal money

28 TH (mUGGER)Y

DOWN

1 R A DISH

2 ST AIRWAYS     st = statute is in Collins

3 GROUPER    Type of fish- pun on ‘sole’

4 (n)EARLY

6 AUTOPSY    (pays out)*

7 B L A IR

8 THEORIST    (tore this)*

9 UNDERSET    An ocean undercurret and set of underwear (cryptically)

14 COCK L OFT

15 R (EC) APTURE

17 S (IT T) IGHT

19 EX-CRETE

21 (Ian) RANKIN G       Scottish crime writer (Inspector Rebus)- this was my favourite clue

22 JERE(z)  (Spanish town famous for sherry) MY

24 PER(s)ON      Argentine leader

25 MARCH    The month of March having a few weeks

7 Responses to “Independent 7235 by Dac”

  1. Conrad Cork says:

    I think we should wish Dac a seriously Cool Yule as a reward for the splendid work he turns out week after week.

  2. IanN14 says:

    I think it was Ali who said last week that Dac is probably the best clue-for-clue setter around.
    I think I’d have to agree with that…
    Not difficult, but very tidy.

  3. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Now I’m getting to know the setters’ styles and idiosyncrasies better, I’m finding I can usually manage a Dac, and nearly did so today, failing on UNDERSET and having to Google for MANIPLE. All I’d say about the latter is that in a dd when both the definitions are quite obscure, unless you’ve come across the word before (probably in a crossword) then you’re pretty much banjaxed. And I have been following the discussion on ‘one person’s obscure is another person’s commonplace’, but still …

    A small niggle, though – Dac provided me with a very enjoyable hour or so this morning waiting for the temperature to rise to freezing so I could go and do battle in the local supermarket.

    If it’s not too off-topic, why are there usually so many fewer contributions for the Indie blog than for the Grauniad? Is it just a reflection of their relative circulations or are Grauniad readers by nature more garrulous?

  4. Ali says:

    It was indeed me Ian, and there ain’t anything in this puzzle
    that will make me change my mind! Top drawer stuff as ever, though I was beaten by underset, maniple and Jeremy

  5. dac says:

    Thanks, Conrad, for your kind seasonal sentiments. Christmas greetings to the bloggers and contributors whose comments I read and appreciate week after week.

  6. nmsindy says:

    Happily reciprocated from here, and as well to all the Indy setters who have given us great puzzles over 2009. To my fellow bloggers and all commenters too.

  7. Allan_C says:

    My only small niggle is that I didn’t know that Maniple could be an ornamental band and hence couldn’t see that the clue was cryptic – it seemed to be virtually a straight definition.

    But as others have already said – Merry Christmas to all!

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