Fifteensquared

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Independent 7262 by Tees

Posted by NealH on January 25th, 2010

NealH.

*=anag, []=dropped, <=reversed, hom=homophone, CD=cryptic def, DD=double def, sp=spoonerism

A delightful and very solvable puzzle from Tees. The clues were always fair, with the only obscure phrases (27 and 14) having straightforward clues. There was no NINA that I could see but there was neat mini-theme involving 16 across.
 

Across
10/23 High heaven: Ea in (hhh given)*. Ref to the phrase “stink to high heaven”.
11 Ear Trumpet: I think this [h]eart + [c]rumpet.
12 Simmer: S[l]immer.
13 Sheraton: As< around her + ton.
14 Slouch hat: (Col[in] has hut)*. The dictionary definition doesn’t mention any Australian military connection, but the wiki article has more detail.
16 Stink: [tha]t in sink.
18/26/1/5 Up the creek without a paddle: (Duke that Poe captured while)*.
20 Badminton: B + dominant*.
24 Pasadena: (An ed ASAP)<.
25 Nectar: Near around ct.
27 Zend Avesta: Hidden in Citizen Dave’s Talmud. Sacred texts in the Zoroastrian religion.
28 Evil: I’ve< + l.
29 Confine: Con + fine.
30 Weekend: Wee ken + first letter of dangerous.
Down
2 Initial: CD (i.e leading letter of words).
3 Ho hum: Ho (offensive word for woman) + hum (stink).
4 Unearth: Une + Arth[Ur].
6 Porker: R in poke + another R beyond (i.e. at the end of the word).
7 Dumbarton: Dumb + art + on.
8 Lie Down: (Wine old)*.
9 Fresh as a Daisy: (Say Hades is far)*.
14 Sou: S[i]ou[x].
15 Unheard of: (Freud Noah)*.
17 Kin: Ink with k moved to the front. Or, as other commenters pointed out, could also be skin starting with a later letter.
19 Placebo: Place + BO (body odour = personal stink).
21 Montage: Montag[u]e (one of the families from Romeo and Juliet).
22 Oration: On about ratio.

8 Responses to “Independent 7262 by Tees”

  1. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thank you, Neal, for the prompt and helpful blog. Don’t think we’ve had Tees for a while, but I remember enjoying his last one and this was no different. Took ages to get going but once I got the ‘p’ in PLACEBO then the long anagram went in and after that, it was an entertaining and interesting solve.

    I took 2dn to mean the first, or initial letter of a word, but I’m stumped for how ‘ink’ works in 17dn.

    Thought the surfaces in 12ac and 8dn were very cleverly done.

  2. walruss says:

    Isn’t it just ‘skin’ without the first letter?!

    Very good today, some lovely definitions such as for SIMMER, enjoyed the mini-theme.

  3. nmsindy says:

    Yes, this was very good, quite tricky, finally got the long phrase when I’d a few crossing letters. HIGH HEAVEN very amusing, also esp liked SIMMER, LIE-DOWN, PLACEBO, and ORATION and the ‘stink’ theme. I read KIN as in comment 2 above.

  4. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thanks, walruss and nms, for the explanation for 17dn.

  5. Tees says:

    Many thanks for the blog and generous comments.

    KIN was indeed SKIN ‘with (a) later start’ (as a variation on the first letter subtraction theme), and ‘Letter from the front’ was a CD, based on the idea that initals are taken from the front end of the words they represent. Collins gives the Aussie Army a mention in its def for slouch hat, fyi, and a digger is an Aussie (or Kiwi) soldier.

    Murky buckets
    Tees

  6. Barbara says:

    #29. Say Cameron close to limit (7)
    Ans: confine
    Please explain the wordplay

  7. Gaufrid says:

    Barbara

    CON (say Cameron {leader of the Conservative party}) FINE (close) def. ‘to limit’

  8. anax says:

    Tees. Sorry – I did solve this and loved it to bits, and only just realised I never left a comment.

    I thought the (s)KIN device was a top notch bit of indicatoriness and, as mentioned above, the SIMMER def was super. Keep it up old chap, you’re doing a belting job.

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