Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Guardian 24,922 (Rufus)

Posted by diagacht on February 1st, 2010

diagacht.

The week starts with Rufus. Exactly what you might expect with a large number of cryptic definitions.

Across
1 EJECTS: (r)EJECTS with R right away
5 SHOWCASE: double definition
9 ABOVE ALL: anagram of A LOVABLE
10 THATCH: THAT CH (church)
11 PALM: double definition
12 EMPLOYMENT: double definition
13 VIENNA: ANNE (reversed, retires) after VI (6)
14 RESTRAIN: RAIN (shower) after REST (all the others)
16 OFFENDER: END (last) in OFFER (bid)
18 ROCOCO: OR (reversed, gold) + CO CO (two firms, companies)
20 OCCUPATION: double definition
22 TIME: IT (reversed) + ME
23 SINBAD: SIN (error) + BAD (poor)
24 UNDERWAY: anagram of NUDE WARY
25 ANTELOPE: anagram of OPEN LATE
26 SPEEDY: SPEY (river) around (traps) ED (journalist)
Down
2 JOB SATISFACTION: cryptic definition
3 CAVEMAN: cryptic definition
4 STAGEHAND: cryptic definition
5 SELF-PORTRAITURE: cryptic definition
6 OUTDO: an outside party, a barbecue OUT DO
7 CRAMMER: cryptic definition
8 SECOND IN COMMAND: SECOND (didn’t last long) + IN COMMAND (in charge)
15 SERENADES: cryptic definition
17 EQUABLE: anagram of BE EQUAL
19 COTERIE: COT (resting place) above ERIE (lake)
21 AUDIO: anagram of OUIDA

30 Responses to “Guardian 24,922 (Rufus)”

  1. Dawn says:

    Thanks for the blog. I got there in the end but I didn’t understand how a palm was a victory sign? Mind you, I put audio in but didn’t see it was an anagram!

  2. Simon G says:

    Dawn – according to Wiki, the palm branch was a symbol of triumph and victory in pre-Christian times…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_branch_(symbol)

  3. Dawn says:

    Thanks Simon,

    I was thinking of the more modern victory v sign. Always good to start the week by learning something new.

  4. Ian says:

    Slightly harder than the norm for Rufus I thought.

    I particularly liked 6dn which somehow reminded me of that wonderful Taupi clue ‘No Can Do” (6,5).

  5. matt says:

    Struggled to get the last few in this one, still not sure I get 4d or 7d

  6. Simon G says:

    Matt – in the way of these things, I got the answer first and then spent some time trying to validate it… ended up with ‘convey’ as in carry and ‘properties’ as in theatre stage sets hence ‘stagehand’. Similar process with 7d but without a conclusion! I don’t really understanding the significance of ‘secondary’ unless it’s just a reference to another teacher who specialises in cramming?

  7. matt says:

    I was thinking along those lines, 4d makes a bit more sense like that, and I forgot to ask why a custom officers demand is a showcase?

  8. Tom_I says:

    Shouldn’t it be “customs” (plural) in 5a?

    Matt, a customs officer might demand that you SHOW (your suit)CASE.

  9. matt says:

    Clink! That’s the sound of the penny dropping. Thanks :)

  10. Tom_I says:

    Re 7d, to cram can mean to teach or learn hastily and intensively for an exam. A CRAMMER can be a teacher employed for that purpose, who presumably wouldn’t be your main teacher, hence a secondary one.

  11. Tom_I says:

    Sorry, didn’t read the end of Simon G’s comment @6, so I have more or less just repeated it.

  12. Mike says:

    14 – last weeks everyman (3304) had 3d “Check all others before shower”

  13. Ed H says:

    5ac eluded me after entering “grammar” for 7dn (“A secondary teacher”). Other than it being wrong for the puzzle, I’d venture that it’s not a bad answer, and as valid as “crammer”.

    Agree with Tom_I that 5ac should have been “customs” not “custom”. That misdirected me for a while, before I decided it was probably a typo.

  14. AlyD says:

    Good puzzle – as Ian stated, more challenging than the usual Rufus. The longer clues were pitched about right.

    Agree ‘crammer’ was a bit woolly, though. I’d heard of ‘cramming’ at the last minute for exams, but not of a teacher employed for that purpose.

  15. Richard says:

    Good puzzle. Thank you for the blog, diagacht.

    Am I being overly picky to suggest that 6dn should have used ‘better’ instead of ‘best’? If you outdo someone or something you better them or it, surely?

  16. Mr Beaver says:

    Richard. – I suppose ‘best’ could be a verb in the sense of beating someone in a contest ? Still don’t like it much – to say a barbecue is an ‘out’ do grates somewhat.
    I though 1d was outrageous – I know you expect easy clues from Rufus, but really!
    And is 12a really a dd ? Sort of one-and-a-half definitions.. (But then it is Rufus)
    On the other hand, credit where it’s due, 5d was very neat and I liked 8d too.

  17. sandra says:

    thank you for the blog diagacht.

    this was an enjoyable crossword. at first i thought it was going to be far too easy, but was soon brought down to size! quite a few made me grin – not a bad way to start the week. i wasn’t too sure about 24a until i had all the checking clues, as the definition isn’t too clear – or i am missing something?

    have never heard of crammer as a teacher, which isn’t surprising – long time since i was at school! but i seem to have heard the word used in conjunction with a college. anybody help me out on this?

  18. NealH says:

    For 24a, I decided modelling was the anagram indicator and “making a move” the definition.

  19. JimboNWUK says:

    Best clue I reckoned was 6d… at least properly cryptic and mildly amusing too.

    Didn’t like 7D at all.

  20. walruss says:

    I felt that too Jimbo, but could not be bothered to say!! Thankyou. Quite tawdry today.

  21. sandra says:

    thanks neil h.

    that’s how i was looking at it, but now you have made me think a bit more i sort of get it.

  22. sandra says:

    sorry – i meant NealH, of course!

  23. Brian Harris says:

    Knocked off all apart from 7down in about ten mins flat.

    Still don’t really get 7down. “Crammer” was our best guess, as it was the only word that fit related in any way to teaching, but…. nope, I’m a bit baffled.

  24. Jake says:

    This was a fantastic crossword. I did not need any reference, or doubt answers I’d
    placed in the grid, a most comfortable level for sitting on the beach in Rio- with
    no dictionaries needed – most enjoyable.

    Nice one Rufus – A pleasure to solve!

  25. cholecyst says:

    Not up to Rufus’s usual standard, I thought. 5ac. is nonsensical. I’ve never been asked to show my case in Customs. Open case, maybe; which could lead to a clue the answer to which might be “open and shut case”

  26. Derek Lazenby says:

    Yeah, another voice to add to the feeling that some of the cds were less than wonderful. 2,4,5,6 for me, but got there eventually.

  27. rrc says:

    Very enjoyable crossword

  28. Malcolm says:

    Ref 7d: my version of Roget’s Thesaurus lists ‘crammer’ as a teacher.

  29. MartinB says:

    I thought this was far too simple and unworthy of the Guardian: EJECTS: (r)EJECTS with R right away

    and this is rather nonsensical, i agree: SHOWCASE: double definition

    i also disliked crammer

  30. Martin H says:

    Yes, MartinB, r(EJECTS) is particularly dreadful, even for Rufus. At least they limit him to Monday, so you can always buy The Independent instead

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