Fifteensquared

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Independent on Sunday 1045 by Quixote – 21st February 2010

Posted by Handel on February 25th, 2010

Handel.

Two unknown words and one unknown spelling made this a tougher challenge for your faithful correspondents. One clue we haven’t successfully parsed.

ACROSS

4. POUND triple definition.

6. HE I NOUS

8. CONNIVER ‘inn’ backwards inside cover

9. H(UM)OUR

10. LA TEST

11. BO(LONE)Y spent a long time on this convinced that ‘baloney’ was the only way to spell it, turns out that’s a load of boloney

12. C LASS WILL TELL as in William Tell, El loves clues like this

16. CUBICLE cub, then (lice)*

18. ALBAN Y St Alban of St Albans fame

20. GRILLE e.g. backwards around rill. This one got all up in ours and took a while to solve

21. ECHIDNAS (chased in)*. A new word for us, ‘an Australian toothless, spiny, egg-laying, burrowing monotreme’, apparently

22. BA(SKIN)G

23. R(ACE)D

DOWN

1. NU(is)ANCE

2. WIT HAL

3. COMMENCE ‘commerce’ with an ‘n’ rather than an ‘r’

4. PROSAIC ‘o’ in (Paris)*

5. DE(VOTE)S

6. HARD-BOILED EGG Cryptic definition

7. STUD Y and why not?

13. A R B(A)LEST another unfamiliar one, it means ‘a crossbow’

14. L(E)ATHER

15. LANYARD unsure of the parsing of this: ‘One going over a river secured by light line’

16. CA< ROB

17. C RED IT

19. BOD ICE

7 Responses to “Independent on Sunday 1045 by Quixote – 21st February 2010”

  1. nmsindy says:

    I think it may be the alternative spelling LANIARD with I A R in ‘land’ = light.

  2. duncan shiell says:

    I think the clue is referring to the River Yar which flows into The Solent at Yarmouth, Isle of Wight. So I would go with LAN(YAR)D and agree that ‘land’ is defined by light (alight).

  3. nmsindy says:

    I’d LANYARD pencilled in without full understanding, then, going back to the clue, the LANIARD alternative occurred. We’ll not know till Sun, but “One going over a river” seems to be just a little bit more than Yar.

  4. eimi says:

    Alternative spellings are always problematic and must be precisely clued. Duncan’s parsing doesn’t seem to account for the “One”.

  5. Quixote says:

    I’m surprised LANIARD caused so much of a problem. NMS got it right of course. ECHIDNA will become familiar over time, usuallly in the singular form as an anagram of CHAINED.

  6. Handel says:

    Thanks for the explanations everybody! I guess, for office dwellers like me, ‘lanyard’ seems so humdrum and is something we write almost every day, so ‘laniard’ feels even more alien than it should, like a glamorous alter ego.

  7. NeilW says:

    Thanks, Handel.

    By the way, you missed the C (about) at the end of 4dn.

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