Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 7,319 by Nimrod

Posted by Simon Harris on April 1st, 2010

Simon Harris.

One doesn’t tend to expect a Nimrod to be easy, but this was perhaps tougher than usual.

Fortunately, the Nina on the top and bottom rows made itself evident fairly early on, and proved to be a big help. Even so, I didn’t manage this all myself, not least as there’s some pretty weekendy vocabulary in there. A few are yet to be explained so do fee free to help out.

*=anag, []=dropped, <=reversed, hom=homophone, cd=cryptic definition, dd=double definition.

Across
9 BEATITUDE – BEAT IT + DUE*.
10 BRUCE – CURB< + E[nglishman]. Bruce and Sheila are stereotypical Australian male and female names respectively.
11 U-SHAPED – (HEADS UP)*.
12 PRUDENT – PRUDE + N + T.
13 DEMOISELLE – (SEED + MOLLIE)*. I initially thought this must be something used in fly fishing, but it’s both a type of dragonfly and a fish.
14 YOUR – Y + OUR.
16 DILATE – (ETA + LID)<.
18 GYPSUM – GYP + SUM.
22 FETAF + ATE<.
23 WEATHERMAN – (THERM in (A + A)) in WEN. One of those ones where the answer came fairly swiftly, but the wordplay took quite some working out.
26 MERMAID – (A DIMMER)*. The Mermaid Theatre is, I think, still in the City of London, next to Blackfriars Station.
27 E-TAILER – TAIL in EER.
28 SATIN – SAT IN.
29 EXTRADITE – not sure here: I can see IT (“just the ticket”) in DEXTER*, but that leaves an “A” unaccounted for.
Down
1 ABOUNDED – ABOU[t e]NDED.
2 FATHOMF + AT HOM[e].
3 OIL PAINTS – (I SLAP IT ON)*. A very pleasing anagram!
4 OUTDOESDO in [r]OUTES. I like “resistance is futile” for “remove the initial R” here.
5 LEG-PULL – dd. A wind-up or April fool’s prank, and a specific cricket shot to the “on” or “leg” side.
6 ABOUT – A BOUT.
7 NUMEROUS – (UM + ER) in NOUS. The “everyday” seems a little superfluous, so I wonder if it’s just there for the surface.
8 DEXTER – dd. This was a nice one. Colin Dexter is the author of the Morse books, while “dexter” as an adjective means “on the right-hand side”, thus the opposite of “sinister”, which originally meant “on the left side” or perhaps “left-handed”.
15 MYCENAEAN – (A + CAN + ENEMY)*.
17 LITERATI – LITER + something I can’t fathom.
19 MINOR KEY – I can’t explain this one yet.
20 PER DIEM – DEMIREP*.
21 STRETTOTR in SET-TO. “Stretto” is “part of a fugue in which subject and answer are brought closely together”.
22 FAMISH – AM in FISH.
24 MOLLIE – M[ayor] + OLLIE. Chambers has MOLLIE as a variant of “mallemaroking”, which is a type of merry-making specific to the occupants of ice-bound ships, so this is fairly obscure vocabulary for a daily, if that’s what’s intended.
25 MAINS – [odoe]MA IN S[hort].

10 Responses to “Independent 7,319 by Nimrod”

  1. Conrad Cork says:

    I thought ATI in 17 down meant ‘at one’ namely lunch time. Could be wrong.

  2. Gaufrid says:

    Hi Simon
    In 29ac, the clue is ‘… a 8 criminal …’ so the A is accounted for.

    17dn is LITER (American’s quantity drunk) AT 1 (for lunch)

    19dn is I’M reversed (writer’s heading for north) NORKEY – ORKNEY with the N moved forward (archipelago to promote first of novels)

    I think 15dn is faulty. The clue reads *(A CAN) (anagrind cleverly) in *(ENEMY) (anagrind evil) but this does not give MYCENAEAN

  3. Conrad Cork says:

    PS the extra ‘a’ in 29 across sin in the clu. ‘A 8 criminal’.

  4. pat says:

    Too many unknown words for me – – DEMOISELLE, MOLLIE. Never heard of ‘em.

  5. IanN14 says:

    Gaufrid,
    I think the word “infiltrate” implies that *(A CAN) “permeates” into *(ENEMY), rather than just appearing whole, perhaps?

  6. Gaufrid says:

    IanN14
    You are probably right, but it should also be ‘infiltrates’ so I am still less than happy with this clue.

  7. IanN14 says:

    I agree, Gaufrid.
    Just playing Devil’s Advocate.
    I also didn’t care for “cleverly” as an indicator…
    Or “evil” for that matter.

  8. anax says:

    For those seeking extra help, the apposite “SOON PARTED” is also there.

    Another sublime test from Nimrod; favourite by far was NUMEROUS for its hint of colloquialism in “everyday sense” for NOUS.

  9. nmsindy says:

    Yes, that was clever. I thought of the possibility, looked, but did not spot it. Even after being told it was there by Anax above, it still took a while to find. Some v good clues, esp liked BEATITUDE, SATIN, ABOUNDED, FATHOM, NUMEROUS. Also as others have said, I found it hard.

  10. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Previous comments will confirm that this was too tough for me today, but I got about a third of it, so I live in hope.

    A good holiday weekend to all the regulars (and indeed non-regulars) here.

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