Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Financial Times 13,359 / Cinephile

Posted by Gaufrid on April 14th, 2010

Gaufrid.

Some unusually easy clues in today’s puzzle from Cinephile, offset by a couple that needed something a bit more than general knowledge. I found it a relatively gentle start to the morning.

The thematic clues that lacked definition were all items of household linen, three items of bedding and two words for the same item that protects one from spilt food. We also had BC and AD in their full forms appearing in the grid, defined as ‘early days’ and ‘later days’.

Across
1 DUVET COVER  V (5) in DUET (2) C (100) OVER (more)
6 SARI  hidden in ‘impreSARIo’
9 ANTIBIOTIC  ANT (insect) IBI[s] (tailless wader) OTIC (for the ear)
10 STYE  STY (pen) E (energy)
12 BEFORE CHRIST  FOR in BEECH (timber) R (take) I (one) ST (street)
15 ANIMALIST  *(I TALISMAN)
17 SHEET  cd
18 DALEK  DALE (valley) K (knighthood)
19 SERVIETTE  R (right) VIE (fight) in SETTE[r] (I have no right)
20 NEW ENGLANDER  NE (north-eastern) LAND (ground) in WENGER (football manager)
24 TILT  dd
25 ANNO DOMINI  AN NOD (agreement) O (love) MINI (something small)
26 NAPE  N (northern) APE (primate)
27 REFERENDUM  REFER (allude to) END (final) UM (hesitation)

Down
1 DEAL  dd
2 VOTE  V (volume) *(TOE)
3 TABLE NAPKINS  *(PLATE IN BANKS)
4 OVOLO  VOL (book) in OO (rings) – an architectural moulding which, according to Collins, has the alternative names ‘quarter-round’ and ‘thumb’. Nowadays it seems that joiners simply refer to it as ‘quad’ (or ‘quadrant’) but this doesn’t appear to have made it into the usual references as yet.
5 EPICENTER  EPIC (saga) ENTER (go into)
7 ANTOINETTE  *(NEAT NOTE IT)
8 IDENTITIES  I (one) DENT (depression) I (one) TIES (restriction)
11 CHESHIRE HOME  CHESHIRE (wartime pilot) HOME (aristocratic premier) – Group Captain Geoffrey Leonard Cheshire, Baron Cheshire, VC, OM, DSO and Two Bars, DFC and Sir Alec Douglas-Home (Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT, PC)
13 PADDINGTON  PADDING (unnecessary words) TO N (pole)
14 PILLOW SLIP  PILL (medicine) OWS (cries of pain) LIP (edge of mouth)
16 INSOLENCE  SOLE (fish) in INN (pub) CE (church)
21 NOOSE  O (ring) in NOSE (where bull would have it)
22 BIRD  dd – a reference to Charles (Charlie) Parker, American jazz saxophonist, whose nickname was Bird
23 FILM  cd

5 Responses to “Financial Times 13,359 / Cinephile”

  1. Eileen says:

    Thanks, Gaufrid.

    As you say, this was rather easy for a Cinephile – and a rather odd theme! I did rather hastily enter LIST, since I knew the term ‘enter the lists’, for 24ac, on the first run through but, fortunately, PADDINGTON quickly put me right when I got to him!

    I thought 11dn was rather weak, since Cheshire Homes were founded by Group Captain Leonard Cheshire, so it was hardly cryptic. [They're now called Leonard Cheshire Disability care homes now, I've just discovered.]

  2. Oldham says:

    Why in 12a does R mean take?
    Thanks

  3. Gaufrid says:

    Hi Oldham

    r is the abbreviation for recipe, the Latin for ‘take’, and is/was generally used on doctor’s prescriptions.

  4. Oldham says:

    Many thanks Gaufrid.

  5. Sil van den Hoek says:

    This crossword definitely proves that I am still not at the same level as Gaufrid and Eileen.
    Normally, I get into a Cinephile rather quickly, but this time not really.
    And (eventually) making a start with STYE and ANTOINETTE didn’t help, because they were crossing each other in the outskirts of the grid.
    For me, it was nót an easy Cinephile [but today's Araucaria was even worse, not even completed it yet, so no comments from us today - haven't even looked at the blog].

    Even so, some great clues.
    A very ‘refreshing’ theme, non cultural, quite unexpected.
    With some very good clues, like SERVIETTE and TABLE NAPKINS.

    Other highlights: PADDINGTON, NEW ENGLANDER, ANNO DOMINI and NOOSE.

    Just like Eileen, not so happy with 11d.
    Meanwhile, I think, SHEET is pretty poor too.

    Don’t think this crossword was easy, but ‘not too bad’ [as they say in this country].

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