Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Financial Times 13,357 – Crux

Posted by Uncle Yap on April 22nd, 2010

Uncle Yap.

Monday Prize Crossword on 12 April 2010
Another soft introduction to the FT week with a wide variety of cryptic devices ranging from the simple anagram to homophones to double definitions; none too difficult nor taxing. Good entertainment.

ACROSS
1 SEAMUS *(assume)
4 DICTATOR Sounds like Dick (short for Richard) tater (short for potato of which Murphy is a slang term)
10 LORDLIEST Tichy dd
11 SYNOD ha
12 TAFT Acrostic i.e. first letters of the fodder
13 DIMINUENDO Cha of DIM (stupid) INUENDO (sounds like innuendo or suggestion) for a decrease in loudness like how a lullaby ought to be played
15 CRICKET *(CoarsE TRICK)
16 GUTTER Cha of G (first letter of golf) UTTER (say)
19 GYPSUM Cha of GYP (pain, torture) SUM (total)
21 COPPERS dd for police (old Bill) and coins or small change (derisory pay)
23 REFERENDUM REF (referee or whistle-blower) + *(under me)
25 ETNA E (English) TNA (rev of ANT, worker) for that hot-tip, the volcano on Sicily island
27 ADD UP I would call this a duplicate def raather than a dd
28 UNDERPASS Cha of UNDER (inferior) PASS (passage) Allusion to the fabled chicken who thought the sky was falling down; I wonder why Crux used proverbial instead of fabled?
29 EXECRATE Cha of EXEC (executive) RATE (tax)
30 LEAN ON Cha of LE (French definite article) ANON (before long)

DOWN
1 SOLSTICE *(costliest minus T) when the sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer or Capricorn (21/22 June or Dec respectively)
2 AIRY FAIRY (H) AIRY, bearded + FAIRY (elf)
3 UGLI sounds like UGLY
5 IN THING Ins of THIN (slim) in *(gin)
6 TISSUE TYPE dd especially for organ transplant
7 TENON Cha of TEN (number 10) ON
8 RED-HOT The term red-hot poker refers to the plant  Kniphofia or Tritoma.
9 DEPICT Tichy clue by way of using de-pict to mean get rid of the Pict (as debug) The Picts were a confederation  of Celtic  tribes living in what was later to become eastern and northern Scotland  from before the Roman conquest of Britain until the 10th century, when they merged with the Gaels
14 SKYSCRAPER Cha of SKY (TV company) SCRAPE (trouble) R (right)
17 EYESTRAIN Cha of EYES (they inspect) TRAIN (school) with a very creative def, which puts pressure on pupils.
18 ASSASSIN Ass Ass (foolish x 2) in
20 MANHUNT Assassin being chased by coppers
21 CLUEDO Cha of CLUE (essential for solving) DO (party) a deduction board game originally marketed by Waddingtons in Leeds, United Kingdom in 1949
22 ARCADE Sounds like ARK (Noah’s) AID (assistant)
24 FUDGE dd
26 BRIE Odd letters of BeRlInEr for a white, soft cheese originally made in Brie, NE France.

Key to abbreviations
dd = double definition
dud = duplicate definition
tichy = tongue-in-cheek type
cd = cryptic definition
rev = reversed or reversal
ins = insertion
cha = charade
ha = hidden answer
*(fodder) = anagram

3 Responses to “Financial Times 13,357 – Crux”

  1. Sil van den Hoek says:

    Being unfamiliar with this setter, I was pleasantly surprised by the Cruxword.
    Friendly puzzle, but by no means too soft I thought.

    Just like you, UY [fine blog again], I liked the surface (including the definition) of 17d (EYESTRAIN).
    But ‘structure’ being the definition for SKYSCRAPER, well, mmm.
    Not so enthusiastic either about 20d , hardly cryptic.
    Thanks to your explanation I now understand DEPICT (9d), which I so far didn’t.
    Very nice (natural) use of ‘working under me’ in 23ac.

    Clue of the Day, though, for me by miles: 1dn (SOLSTICE).
    Simple anagram, but embedded in a splendid surface.

    I will certainly try a next Crux.

  2. Gaufrid says:

    Hi U Y
    28ac “I wonder why Crux used proverbial instead of fabled?”

    Because he was referring to the old joke ‘Why did the chicken cross the road? …..’

  3. Uncle Yap says:

    Ah ! So ! Thank you, Gaufrid, is there anything you do not know? :-)

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