Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 7,343 by Eimi

Posted by Simon Harris on April 29th, 2010

Simon Harris.

I enjoyed this one a lot, even though it was fairly easy for a Thursday, as Eimi intimated it might be. Some of the anagrams in particular are blinding. I did this on paper at the station, but on blogging I note that the online version contains an extra little message on completion. I guess this is a quote from one of the books that form the theme, but can’t claim to be terribly familiar with them I’m afraid.

*=anag, []=dropped, <=reversed, hom=homophone, cd=cryptic definition, dd=double definition.

Across
8 OUTHOUSE – OUT + HOUSE. “House” is a doctor played by Hugh Laurie in an American show I’ve never watched.
9 IDLING – [br]IDLING[ton].
10 WINNIE-THE-POOH – (HOPE WITHIN ONE)*.
13/11/20 THE HOUSE AT POOH CORNER – (POETS HONOUR EACH OTHER)*.
15 NOW WE ARE SIX – NOW + WEAR + E + XIS<.
19 FRIENDLY – dd.
25/21 WHEN WE WERE VERY YOUNG – (WHY REVENUE GREW ON YEW)*.
26 UP-TO-DATE – U + PTO + DATE.
Down
1 OUTWITSOU + TWITS.
2 WHIN – WHIN[e].
3 MUNICH – MUNI + CH. Paul Muni eventually won an Oscar for his performance in the biographical drama The Story of Louis Pasteur, I learn.
4 HEATE in HAT.
5 MISERERE – SERE in MIRE. My last one in, and I’d wager I’m not the only one.
6 ALTO – [w]ALTO[n].
7 ENTHUSE – [p]ENTH[o]USE. Liked this a lot.
12 OZONE – OZ + ONE.
13 TEARY – A in (John) TE[r]RY.
14 OSIER – [h]OSIER[y].
16 WIDE VIEWWI + DEVI + WE<.
17 GROWTHS – HOGW[a]RTS*.
18 NEWGATE – NEW + GATE.
20 COYOTE – COY + OTE.
22 RUNG – hom. of “wrung”.
23 ROUT – ROUT[e]? Not quite sure here.
24 URDU – RD in (U + U).

17 Responses to “Independent 7,343 by Eimi”

  1. Paul A says:

    23D – R tailender finally) + OUT (dismissed)

  2. NealH says:

    I enjoyed this, even though I know next to nothing about Winnie the Pooh. 13/11/20 was a bit of a struggle for me (the fact that I kept thinking it was the House on something didn’t help). I thought of Munich straightaway, but had never heard of Paul Muni, so didn’t put it in until I’d got all the crossing letters. Like Simon, I didn’t follow 23 down – I think it was possibly a bit unfair to use the last letter of a two word phrase.

  3. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thank you, Simon, for the blog.

    Not too tricky once you’d twigged the theme. Having read all the A A Milne books to Kathryn about a squillion times when she was little, couldn’t help but smile when it became apparent.

    Really liked OUTHOUSE and UP-TO-DATE; I’m guessing that those of us who know eimi’s football allegiance will understand where the surface of 13dn is coming from; and I thought 23dn was fine, since ‘tail-ender’ with a hyphen is one word and the surface was very clever.

    No idea about the online version completion message. But I’m a Bear of Little Brain, so I could be missing something.

  4. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Or, having just got the book out to check the exact quote, a Bear of Very Little Brain …

  5. nmsindy says:

    Missed out on those books totally in childhood and only began to hear about them through puzzles. Thought of the theme when I saw EEYORE in a clue (he could not be there randomly surely). Some time in the past I did quite a bit of research to see who he was when it seemed a possible answer in a puzzle. Then, as Eimi promised, it became quite easy for a Thursday. Very enjoyable puzzle. Favourite clues, FRIENDLY, MISERERE, ENTHUSE.

  6. pat says:

    23 ROUT…. dismissed = OUT tail-ender = tail of endeR.

  7. NealH says:

    It’s a bit of a stretch to make tail-ender into “tail of ender”. I can’t think of many instances where a hyphen substitutes for “of”. I would interpret tail-ender as either l or ende.

  8. Gaufrid says:

    NealH
    That wasn’t what was intended. The clue was “Tail-ender finally dismissed …..” so ‘finally’ indicated the last letter of ‘tail-ender’ and the OUT was simply clued as ‘dismissed’.

  9. NealH says:

    Yes, I know. I was responding to Pat’s suggestion.

  10. Gaufrid says:

    Hi NealH
    Sorry, I didn’t see your comment in context. Having noticed your comment in the comments list my means of accessing the post meant that your comment was at the top of the screen and Pat’s comment wasn’t visible.

  11. Paul B says:

    Very nice indeed, and as often with Eimi, hardly a tough word to accommodate the theme. Nice trip back to childhood for me, and some great anagrams to boot.

  12. flashling says:

    Very nice Eimi, pity the dead tree version couldn’t give the applause. Didn’t know Muni but assumed munich from the other letters. I see the whin in 2d, part of a Nina?

  13. eimi says:

    It was flashling that rumbled me when I mentioned that I thought this Thursday’s was easier than normal. I should have known better than to make a seemingly casual remark to an audience used to looking for cryptic meanings.

    This is what Virgilius would call a ghost theme, with an oblique reference in 2 Down, in the same way that my crossword that contained names of Wombles in the Acrosses only mentioned Wombles in one of the Down clues.

    I missed out on A A Milne as a child, but like Kathryn’s Dad, read the books to my children and loved them. If you haven’t read them, do – they’re for children of all ages.

  14. Kathryn's Dad says:

    And since 225 bloggers, lurkers and contributors are philosophical types, here’s the key quote:

    ‘Where?’ said Pooh.
    ‘Anywhere’, said Christopher Robin.

    And so to bed …

  15. Wil Ransome says:

    Much enjoyed, although the only A.A. Milne book I read (and re-read many times) was When We Were Very Young. But how is a man singing an alto (6dn)? OK there are occasional male altos, but an alto is a female voice; or is that contralto?

  16. eimi says:

    According to Collins, alto is the highest adult male voice, or (short for) the lowest female voice (contralto), or a singer with such a voice.

  17. eimi says:

    … and my son James was delighted to discover that he was “a very small snail” in When We Were Very Young. If you love words and their possibilities, you’ll love A A Milne.

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