Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 7,361/Nimrod

Posted by Ali on May 20th, 2010

Ali.

Seems to have been a while since I blogged a Nimrod, but I always find his puzzles a good, fun challenge.

I was glad of the mini Iron Man theme and some long anagrams of its stars to open up the grid, but still found this to be tricky, especially the top half. Some good clues in here though and, as I often find with Nimrod, a few that I’ll need help with!

Across
1 STARTERS – Cryptic def. Slightly too cryptic for me as I don’t understand it!
5 FRIEZE – “Freeze”
10 EVOKE – O.K in EVE (of Adam and.. fame)
11 BOWSTRING – (WOT’S)* in BRING
12 DON – Double def.
13 SPRINGFIELD – (FIND GIRLS + P.E)* – Ref. The Simpsons
14 UNTUNED – Cryptic def.
16 TRAVOIS – A v. in TROIS
18 PURVIEW – UP rev. + VIE in RW
20 POSTAGE – STAG in (Edgar Allen) POE
22 CORPOREALLY – COR + (Chris) REA in POLLY
23 OFT – Not sure on this one – ‘More, rather than less, temporal’
24 DRUM MAJOR – Another question mark – there’s JAM rev., but I can’t fathom the ‘golden’ part.
25 ON ICE – I think this is O NICE, as in ‘zero nice’, i.e. all are hostile
26 RED INK – RE-DINK
27 AWAKENED – KEN [-Livingston]E in A WAD
Down
1 SPEED BUMP – PEED (went) + BUM (hobo) in Southern P(ortugal)
2 ACORN – I think this is A (one) + CORN (to preserve)
3 TREASON – T[-he] REASON
4 ROBERT DOWNEY JR. – (JOB + TENDER + WORRY)*
6 GWYNETH PALTROW – (TO WHY PLANT GREW)*
7 RATAFIA – A1 IF A TAR rev.
8 EMILE ZOLA – OZ in ALE + LIME, all rev.
9 EDGED – G (force) in ED x 2
15 TURN ROUND – TURN (go over) ROUND (circular)
17 SHEET BEND – E.T + B[-eing] in SHE END
19 IRON MAN – (IN ON ARM)*
21 SHYLOCK – SHY on LOCK
22 CIDER – IDE in C(ountry) R(egion)
23 ONION – 1 (singular) in NO-NO rev.

18 Responses to “Independent 7,361/Nimrod”

  1. Eileen says:

    Thanks, Ali.

    1ac is the first clue, so it’s ‘For starters’.

    23ac: OFT: OF T[ime] [temporal]

    24ac: D’Or = golden. Pusser’s = rum.

  2. Derrick Knight says:

    A tough puzzle – but no complaints at that. I agree with Eileen. Like Ali, I was grateful for the anagrams as, unlike Ali I had no idea who was in IRON MAN and only vaguely remember seeing adverts for it. As always, helpful wordplay leads us to correct solutions and educates us.

  3. sidey says:

    Why is Turkish strangler a bowstring?

  4. walruss says:

    I deployed the reveal button a lot, I’m ashamed to say.

  5. Derrick Knight says:

    For sidey – Ottoman mutes had the job of assassinating people with bowstrings. No – I didn’t know this. I suspect, in the words of Michael Caine, not a lot of people do. But the wordplay led to the answer, despite the esoteric definition. Google confirmed it.

  6. sidey says:

    Thank you Derrick, I’d never heard of it.

  7. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Yes, as expected and already commented on, a tough challenge from Nimrod today. Got one solitary clue on first run-through, then nearly gave up; but persevered and got most of the bottom half and bits of the top half. SPEED BUMP was good (as indeed were many other clues, but I did at least understand that one!)

    Cheers for the blog, Ali – I hope you won’t take this the wrong way, but it’s sometimes a slight encouragement to us less capable solvers to know that the bloggers occasionally struggle to understand everything as well. Practice makes perfect; hopefully with Phi tomorrow.

    That’s practice and not perfection as the main mission in the morning, obviously.

  8. scarpia says:

    I usually enjoy Nimrod/Io/Enigmatist puzzles but having absolutely no knowledge of(or interest in) Marvel Comics, or the Hollywood versions of them,I found this very disappointing.
    Once I’d solved 19 down I couldn’t be bothered to work out the wordplay of 4 and 6 down,so I just Googled ‘Iron Man’ and was immediately able to fill in the 2 longest entries in the grid.
    There was also a bl***y Simpsons reference!
    Comics are for children and I don’t need crossword clues in a serious newspaper referencing them.
    Rant over – I’ll climb down from my soapbox to say that, other than that there were some of this setter’s trademark clues here,in what was a pretty tough puzzzle.

  9. NealH says:

    I got most of the way through this fairly easily, helped by the Iron Man clues. However, I got hopelessly stuck on 1 across – it was far too vague for me and could have been anything. I only got it with the help of a word search, which confirmed that 3 down must be acorn, something that had occurred to me but I’d dismissed, as it didn’t seem to make any sense. I’d never heard of corn meaning to preserve and don’t know anything about Charles II’s hiding places. I assume there must be some legend about him hiding in an oak tree. Overall, while there was a lot of good stuff, I found some of it a bit too vague and obscure.

  10. jp says:

    Some very clever clues. I knew Robert Downey Jr but had to Google ‘Iron Man’ as Scarlet Johannsen wouldn’t fit for 8 down.Some quibbles though. I still don’t get the wordplay for ‘Oft’ in 23 across. Why ‘rather’? And I don’t really get ‘up’ as an anagrind in 11 down. (That does mean an anagram indicator, doesn’t it?) And why does ‘dog’ mean ‘stag’ in 20 across? I also got a bit messed up with ‘Troikas’ for 16 across!

  11. sidey says:

    “Comics are for children”

    They are considerably better than soccer references ;)

    “I’d never heard of corn meaning to preserve”

    Never eaten corned beef? Corns in preserving are salt grains the size of a grain of wheat.

  12. scarpia says:

    sidey.
    I also dislike soccer references,but they are, at least, part of British culture and do not contribute to the proliferation of (crass) American cultural hegemony.

  13. flashling says:

    Like KD struggled with this, got more than 1 one first read but only just, having not seen Iron Man made it trickier and only got the actors from the crossing letters. Must admit my heart sinks when I see Nimrod’s name, don’t remember completing one of his yet.

  14. nmsindy says:

    I thought OFT just means more rather than less ie it happens often with temporal giving the link to time. Re the actors’ names, some of the fun of puzzles is working out a answer one does not know from the wordplay and both of these were fairly clearly anagrams. Like others, I found the puzzle very hard but there were some excellent clues. STAG = DOG (to follow), I think.

  15. Paul B says:

    I think Eileen’s right on that: the SI is OF plus T for time, and ‘of time’ defines ‘temporal’. And you’re right (as Raiches tend to be, of course) about the definition.

  16. Uncle Yap says:

    That was a tough nut to crack, especially as I was held up for a long time trying to fit in STALWART, PROPOSER and SECONDER to 1Across.

    I just wonder whether Nimrod should be confined to weekend prize puzzles as it is hard to imagine the average solver being able to finish this between Welwyn Garden City and Charing Cross Station.

    Nevertheless, it was a superb challenge in spite of new words (to me) like RATAFIA and TRAVOIS.

  17. Allan_C says:

    Yes, definitely a toughie. I was pretty well defeated by the SE corner, though some of them raised the “of course!” reaction.

    Re 2dn, Charles II reputedly hid in an oak tree during his flight after the battle of Worcester. Hence the common pub name the Royal Oak. Didn’t that occur as an answer in a recent crossword?

  18. Allan_C says:

    To answer my own question, yes it was in Bannsider’s puzzle last Saturday.

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