Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Azed 1981: Marmite and curry

Posted by bridgesong on May 23rd, 2010

bridgesong.

A fairly straightforward puzzle this week, which took me a little over two hours to solve, although there were the usual number of obscure and unfamiliar words. No major quibbles, except for one about enumeration.

Rather than reprint the clues, I thought I’d try attaching a link to the pdf of the puzzle for easy reference.

Across
1 CANTUS FIRMI *FRANTI(C) MUSIC
10 SPACE-AGE PACE in SAGE
12 TOWAGE To wage (war)
13 APRON PRO in AN
14 GINK GIN + K. It’s also an anagram of KING. Not sure about the definition here (“man regarded as usual”): Chambers defines the word as a slang term meaning “a person, esp. one considered odd”.
15 CROMED ROME in CD. The word is a dialect word meaning to draw, using a hook or crook.
16 NANKIN NAN + KIN. A variant of nankeen, from Nanking in China.
18 DEFT DEF(ici)T.
20 SPLITTER S + P + litter
22 TIE-BREAK *BIER in TEAK.
24 KEMB Last letters of steak available form lamb; curry (meaning to groom with a comb) is a very clever definition, giving an excellent surface reading.
26 STEPPE STEP + PE
29 RERAIL ERA + I in (ste)RL(ing)
30 OBOL (H)OBO + L. It’s an ancient Greek coin.
31 U-TURN UTU + RN. Utu is a Maori term which can mean vengeance, so the reference to Wellington is to the New Zealand city, not the general after whom it is named.
32 KELOID *O LIKE + D
33 SPLUTTER SP + L + UTTER. SP , which stands for sine prole, meaning without issue or children, is a regular in Azed crosswords.
34 REPLENISHER REP + LENIS + HER. A reasonably straightforward charade, but I had to look up both rep and lenis to discover their meanings.
Down
1 CUT-AND-THRUST CAD’S UNTRUTH + T*
2 APOGAEIC I GO APE* in AC
3 NO-WIN NOW + IN. Azed is a cricket lover, so you can always expect to find a cricket reference such as “in” in his crosswords.
4 TWANK W in TANK. The word is only found under “twang” in Chambers, something that I didn’t discover for some time, and which led me to wonder if Azed had made a mistake.
5 SPEAN PEA in SN (chemical symbol for the metal tin). The fact that spean is a Scottish word is indicated in the clue by the reference to a bairn.
6 FALCULA CU (copper) in FALL, + A. Not sure what “bent” is doing in the clue.
7 REPORT RE(d) + PORT
8 MARMITE MAR + MITE
9 GENDER BENDER REG and NED* + BENDER. I’m not sure about the definition “batting for both sides” unless it’s intended to refer to the batting of eyelashes, in which case it seems a little obscure. And Chambers does not include a hyphen, so this phrase should have been clued as two words.
11 CARD CARD(i)
17 SEMPLICE PIECES + LM*
19 FERRULE REF(rev.) + RULE
21 PERLITE PER + LIT + E (the tip, or end, of torcherE.
23 BEAR UP EAR in PUB (rev.).
25 BINT N in BIT. “Totty” used as a definition indicates that the clue word (and indeed one of its components) may be in poor taste.
26 SOKEN OK in SEN (without). The clue here is particularly misleading. You have to read “limits” as a verb, not as a noun, for the wordplay to work.
27 EBLIS A compound anagram. Take the letters of “Malefic I” from “Islamic belief” and rearrange them. The anagram indicator “bedevil” is almost the definition, although you have to read the clue as a whole for the full meaning.
28 POOCH COOP (rev.) + H

6 Responses to “Azed 1981: Marmite and curry”

  1. liz says:

    Thanks, Bridgesong. Not entirely completed without aids, but slightly less reliance on them than usual. So it must have been easier! Still managed to miss BINT. I had MINT, and I can’t explain why!

    re Gender-bender. ‘Batting for both sides’ is a common expression meaning someone who is bisexual. Not that obscure, I would have thought!

  2. Bob Sharkey says:

    Re 14A I initially took this to be a misprint, but clearly ‘unusual’ would render the surface reading even less convincing. No, it’s in the reading of ‘regarded as usual’ taken to mean the default definition, a person.

  3. Bob Sharkey says:

    Re 26D ‘sen’ as meaning ‘without’ is completely new to me. My reading is SO + KEN(NETH) (= ‘handsome) – see the names section in C.

  4. Gaufrid says:

    Bob
    From Chambers – sen. (music) abbrev: Senza (Ital), without

  5. Bob Sharkey says:

    Thank you, Gaufrid – you remind me that I did,in fact, follow this line (I’m using a 1988 edition this morning) but I sided with the name explanation after having misgivings about ‘limits’ that I now see were unfounded. I had doubts also about ‘so’ and ‘without limits’ being synonymous. Problems with short-term memory – I often find that I can solve a clue, and then, if I don’t record both def. and subsidiary, I have to do it all again, often much later in the overall process.

  6. sidey says:

    Didn’t like gender-bender = bisexual, not the same really. Redeemed by the silly marmite clue.

    The answer to 1ac is misprinted online, that’ll confuse.

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