Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Everyman 3320

Posted by Arthur on May 23rd, 2010

Arthur.

True vintage Everyman this week, in my opinion. Not a single word in the solution that required me to check its definition or an obscure place name to stop me in my tracks. That’s not to say it was particularly straightforward with some beautifully well hidden definitions and subtle cluing all over the shop. Basically, if I was trying to find a crossword to show people exactly how cryptic crosswords and cryptic clues work, I wouldn’t hesitate to use this one. Great stuff.

Across
1 PLACID - PL + A + C.I.D
5 AESOP - A + POSE<
8 ODESSA - DOES* + S.A. “it” here clues sex appeal = S.A.
10 PASTURE – A + ST in PURE
11 GLORIA SWANSON - OSLOASWARNING*
13 CABARET – BARE in ACT*. A lovely cheeky surface.
15 TANTRUM - T(ackle) + ANT + RUM
17 STENCIL – CLIENTS*. Wonderfully simple clue.
19 MEDICAL - CLAIMED*
20 TAKEN FOR A RIDE – dd. Particularly clever when you realise the break comes after the word “is”, meaning the second definition is just one word.
22 TRAPEZE – PART< + “EASE”
23 DIGEST – dd
24 LATER – LATE + R(ace). This is probably the hardest clue to parse: Following = LATER, behind = LATE and leader to race = R; which, again, you have to admit is beautifully neat.
25 SPRITE - (godmothe)R in SPITE.
Down
2 LASSO – L + O around ASS
3 CHARIOT – ITORCHA*
4 DEPOSIT - IS< in DEPOT
5 ABSTAINED - AB + INSTEAD*
6 SQUASH RACKETS - SQUASH + RACKETS
7 PREEN – RE in PEN. Since “about” can so often mean “goes around” it is easy to be caught out by it when it is in fact part of the charade as RE like in this clue.
9 DOG’S BREAKFAST – DOGS + BREAKFAST
12 ACTS – (f)ACTS
14 RACONTEUR – COUNTRARE*
16 MILL – dd
18 LIONESS – NOLESS* around I
19 MEANDER - MEANER around (Ca)D(iz)
20 TOTAL - TOT + AL(one)
21 INGOT - I + GOT around N

Common crossword abbreviations this week:

place = PL
adult = A
it = SA [sex appeal]
way = ST [street]
worker = ANT [as in worker ants]
left = L
round = O
sailor = AB [able-bodied seaman]
one = I
noon = N

7 Responses to “Everyman 3320”

  1. Huw Powell says:

    Wow, first post! This must have just gone live. I had a lot of fun here, proud of finishing it, etc. Thanks, Arthur, for explaining “it” = “S.A.” I had the port but only half knew why.

  2. Rishi says:

    I generally solve Everyman when it is reproduced in a local paper some six or seven weeks later. This one I did online on the original site.
    It was a quick solve for me too.
    It is often mentioned by Don that Everyman is one person. Maybe, but when I come across crosswords such as this one, I have my own suspicion that it is set by a stand-in with their own characteristics.
    I must not forget to mention that I don’t like the agglomeration of black squares like that here: a feature we notice often in Everyman grids.

  3. Davy says:

    Thanks Arthur for explaining LATER which I couldn’t quite figure out. I was trying to fit in LAT(Latvian) for race but that didn’t work. I agree with Rishi about the excess of black squares, it was like part of the crossword was missing.

    The surfaces were excellent with lots of good answers such as MEDICAL and MILL but overall I thought the puzzle was too easy.

  4. Everyman says:

    I started compiling the Everyman crossword in 1994, in tandem with Alec Robins until 1996. I have compiled every puzzle since then.
    What you always get in an Everyman is four long words or phrases (11 letters or more). I don’t see how many black squares there are really matters, unless it’s an aesthetic thing. You should be OK with today’s grid, Rishi.
    Many thanks to Arthur for the kind comments. Much appreciated.

  5. Rishi says:

    Thank you, Everyman, for assuring us that it is one person.

    I have been solving the Indian avatar of Everyman for decades. What a pleasure it has been!

    Solving groups blogging on the puzzle express unconcealed glee over what they perceive as outstanding clues. For them Everyman could often be an anodyne after having fretted and fumed over poor puzzles during the weekdays, these set locally.

  6. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Yes, thank you Everyman for dropping in, and thanks to Arthur for the (as always) helpful blog. Being a long-time Observer reader, The Everyman puzzle for me was the ‘entry level’ cryptic that got me re-interested in solving a few years ago. When I finally solved my first one, I will confess to buying an envelope and a stamp and with a smile on my face, posting the solution.

    The always clear clueing doesn’t mean a lack of wit or sparkle, and while I’ll try the more demanding Indy and Grauniad dailies most days, I never fail to spend a pleasant part of my Sunday morning with the dead-tree version – this morning’s being no exception. But for those who think it’s too easy, there were a couple of toughies in the acrosses in the bottom half today!

  7. sidey says:

    I’ve always liked Everyman including the occasional idiosyncratic grid. As Arthur says, often exemplars for beginners.

    Thanks for popping in Everyman and keep it up Huw.

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