Fifteensquared

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Independent 7373 by Tyrus

Posted by nmsindy on June 3rd, 2010

nmsindy.

Quite a hard puzzle as one expects from Tyrus, with a theme exemplified by 8 down (an answer I worked out only quite late on) and some other entries and wording used in clues.    Solving time, 58 mins, some quite tough clues.    Some quite amusing clues too.   I found the  clues in this puzzle were of the very highest standard.

*= anagram

ACROSS

1 LOCUST   alternate letters of tOuCh in LUST     Stripper in the sense of being destructive of vegetation in the definition, so nicely misleading in the surface reading.

5 DEB   ATE

9 IDLE    Hidden reversal in    … fiELD In

10 ANARCHICAL    ANA(gossip)  R  CHIC (smart)  AL

11 LAP DANCE    A PD (paid) in (clean)*   with an amusing surface.

12 MOONS    ON in MO’S     Nice use of ‘cheeky’

13 STASIS    STASI  – police in the former GDR,    first letter of Suspect

15 HERETICS    HER  and ETHICS less H

17 CROSSTIE   (cot rises)*    A fairly obvious anagram which took me quite a while to work out, nonetheless

19 NEWARK    NEW    ARK

21 NIXON      NIX (nothing)  ON    Absolutely top quality, this, for those who remember Watergate.

22 GET A ROOM   G  = good   (TO AMORE)*

24 UNCENSORED     Tricky, this, I found   Nurse’s = EN’S in COR  all in (NUDE)*

25 ALAS   A LAS(s)

28 PHOTOS     Another very tricky one with a seamless join at erotic/pictures.   HOT in POS(t)  with ‘sent through’ as containment indicator.

27 YATTER    Another one I found tricky   (Tarty e)*    Final letter of piecE

DOWN

2 OLD MASTER    MAST (nuts, in the sense of food for pigs etc) in COLDER less C ie topless

3 UREIDES     (I’d reuse)*    Obscure word helpfully clued with an obvious anagram

4  TRAIN    RA (Gunners) in NIT (reversed)    Misleading surface suggesting Arsenal FC and Arsene Wenger

5 DECAMERON    by Boccaccio from C14.       DE (of in French)  CAMERON  carefully clued as a politician to be general in case the surface might suggest something untoward about an individual, I guess

6 BAIL OUT   AIL in BOUT

7 TEATS   (taste)*

8 PAGE THREE GIRL     (l here, get a grip)*   the L from luck.     For anyone from outside the UK, this is best-known feature of the UK’s best-selling daily newspaper, the  Sun.

14 SATANISTS     Nick = the Devil     SAT (Saturday) AN (one) IS   TS  (first and last letters of tedious)

16 CORPORATE    (poor react)*

18 SEXPERT     Another good clue   SEX (possibly female)   PERT (saucy)

20 WARRANT    W (wife)   ARRANT (perfect)

21 NINTH    Hidden, a musical interval

23 TOD AY       Former newspaper  TOD (fox)  AY (always)

17 Responses to “Independent 7373 by Tyrus”

  1. Derrick Knight says:

    I imagine Tyrus was looking forward to the summer weather

  2. pat says:

    Never got going, particularly in the SW corner. Couldn’t suss out UNCENSORED or PHOTOS. Failed on YATTER and SEXPERT. And I’d started out so well….

  3. Pasquale says:

    I usually my colleague Tyrus very hard, but I romped through this in a few minutes. For me, one Private-Eye-style puzzle is enough and I tire of the juvenile male adolescent humour that increasingly invades some of the daily puzzles. It’s not that I don’t like the odd bit of risque humour, but this in-your-face stuff is a trifle wearisome methinks!

  4. Jake says:

    A rather brilliant puzzle today – I liked the theme.

    I ran through this rather quickly, I did however get stuck on 5dn and 10ac. So thanks for clearing that up!

    Cheers Tyrus – A great battle!

  5. Jake says:

    Pasquale -I agree, I don’t bother with the PE. It could be more varied.

    On the other hand a like the Viz crossword, but one would expect such vulgar, although even that varies in difficulty and humour.

  6. flashling says:

    Good god, what a struggle, got there eventually, did think for a while I was doing a private eye though… enjoyable nonetheless

  7. eimi says:

    I thought this was tough, but fun. I don’t think it was anything like the Private Eye puzzle. I though this was more of a saucy seaside postcard or a Carry-On. Ooh, matron!

  8. eimi says:

    thought, even

  9. Quixote says:

    Pasquale meant to be Quixote before on this thread! Yeah, Mike — but some of that Carry On stuff looks awfully dated now. We’ve been through feminism since then, but even in a supposedly post-feminist age saucy postcards (along with Sex and the City evidently)have lost a bit of their allure (haven’t they? — come on girls, speak up!).

  10. Simon Harris says:

    Found this very tough, but with no Internet in the office, conditions were conducive to ploughing on unaided. Eventually got going and found the whole thing enjoyable and satisfying, albeit without spotting the theme.

  11. NealH says:

    I found this a bit of a struggle. Spotting the two containment indicators in 24 was very difficult and I was convinced the word must be un???sened. Also, got completely convinced that 8 down must start with either make (=model) or take (t=model + something else).

  12. bamberger says:

    Haven’t tried the Indie for ages and what a day to pick!
    5a Girl coming out =deb but where does “ate” come from?
    10a Ana = gossip -never heard of that
    3d An anagram is also “residue” which seemed plausible if not perfect
    5d Decameron -never heard of but politician =cameron wasn’t exactly helpful.
    21d Ok if you know that a ninth is a musical interval -which I didn’t.
    I thought the Times was hard today but this was -well more obscure.

  13. nmsindy says:

    ATE = upset, bamberger. ANA perhaps a little unusual for a daily puzzle but it’s in all the dicts. I think RESIDUE = compounds esp with the plural definition would not really match.

  14. Mick H says:

    I thought ANA was a bit obscure for a daily, but otherwise loved this. GET A ROOM was a gem.

  15. Scarpia says:

    Thanks nms.
    I liked this a lot.
    The clueing was fair,even though I had to look up some parts before understanding fully(ana for instance).
    Didn’t know ‘ureides’ or ‘yatter’ but both were quite gettable once a few check letters were in place.
    21 down was very good for an embedded answer,which are usually the easiest part of a puzzle.
    1 across was an excellent clue and I couldn’t help comparing 5 down with 17 across from Paul’s puzzle in today’s Guardian! :)
    Nice work’Rusty’.

  16. PaulG says:

    Yes, nice one, Rusty! Entertaining and a bit of a struggle.

  17. Tyrus says:

    Many thanks for the blog and comments.

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