Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 7,377 by Radian

Posted by Simon Harris on June 8th, 2010

Simon Harris.

One of my favourite ever crosswords that I’ve had the pleasure of blogging was Radian’s classical music-themed Saturday prize puzzle 7,148, back in September. So I was very pleased to find that today we have another, this time themed around works the of 9ac and 26ac.

This was an excellent puzzle, and a thorough workout that wouldn’t have been out of place on a Saturday. I suspect those without a great deal of knowledge, or at least interest, in the subject might have found this hard going. I’m certainly no expert, but given enough time this was a satisfying solve.

The seemingly non-thematic 17ac is a standout clue, and is perhaps one the finest I can remember having blogged.

*=anag, []=dropped, <=reversed, hom=homophone, cd=cryptic definition, dd=double definition.

Across
8 ROMANTIC – T[ransmissions] in MARCONI*.
9 CHOPINCH + OP + IN.
10 STUD – STUD[y].
11 DIPLODOCUS – (COULD IPODS)*.
12 WRISTS – S[qualid] in WRITS.
14 RADIANTS – RADIAN + T[e]S[t].
15 REQUIEM – QUIE[t] in REM.
17 ODYSSEY – ([ul]YSS[es] in ODE) + [tro]Y &lit. For posterity, the clue was Poem about Ulysses essentially at end of Troy.
20 BLUEFISH – (IF + E)< in BLUSH.
22 GOSPELSP in LEGO*.
23 DETERRENCE – DE + hom. of “Terence”.
24 BUSKS in (B + UK).
25 REJOIN – OJ< (Simpson) in REIN.
26 SCHUMANN – SUCH* + MA + N &lit.
Down
1 NOCTURNE – NO + (TURN in CE). A a musical composition that is inspired by, or evocative of, the night. Twenty-one of the most highly-regarded of such pieces were written by Chopin.
2 SAND – dd. Novelist George Sand, lover of Chopin from 1837-47.
3 ETUDES – I’m afraid I haven’t quite nailed the wordplay here yet.
4 SCEPTRE – (T[he] CREEPS)*.
5 ACCORDED – [b]AC[h] + CREDO* + [sa]D.
6 POLONAISES – (PIANO LESSO[n])*. A slow waltz in the Polish style, some of the best-known examples having been composed by Chopin.
7 MINUET – from lowering the T in MINUTE, as in The Minute Waltz.
13 SQUEEZE-BOX – SQUEEZE + B[oy] + O + X.
16 EMIGRANTG in (TIME RAN)*. I wonder if this is serendipity: Chopin was famously a Polish emigrant himself.
18 EVENSONG – [st]EVENSON G[rudgingly].
19 RHENISH – (HE + SIN<) in RH, and Schumann’s third symphony.
21 LIEDER – hom. of “leader”, the principal violin in an orchestra.
22 GOETHE – (E HE GOT)*. Schumann appears to have set quite some number of Goethe’s words to music, perhaps most notably Faust.
24 BUMF – [Lieder-Al]BUM F[ür die Jugend].

15 Responses to “Independent 7,377 by Radian”

  1. Derrick Knight says:

    I agree, especially re 17 across. 3 down is a very crafty reference to the answer to 10 across.

  2. Gaufrid says:

    Just to expand on Derrick’s comment, in case the parsing is still not clear, 3dn is:

    E (€) + E (English) in *(STUD) (10 spent)

  3. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thanks, Simon. I think you’re right: this was more of a Saturday standard, so that said, I was quite pleased to get within three of finishing it, getting bogged down in the SW corner. However, when you’ve stuck in half a dozen answers without the slighest notion of the wordplay, it’s usually an indication that it’s beyond you.

    I didn’t mind the theme: it’s by no means my specialist subject, but you can’t say that the two composers are exactly unknown, and apart from RHETISH the other musical terms would be in most people’s general vocabulary, I guess. REM, on the other hand … might have had to check that one with Kathryn if she’d been around.

  4. Eileen says:

    Thanks, Simon – and to Radian for a lovely puzzle [and not just because the theme was right up my street].

    Favourite clues: 22 and 25ac and 6 28dn and, of course, 17ac: the answer went in immediately, without thinking, from the first three words of the clue, but then it’s a case of stand back and admire while the stunning craftsmanship sinks in – certainly one of the best &lits I’ve seen.

  5. sidey says:

    A Marmite theme, I didn’t bother once it became obvious.

  6. TRIALNERROR says:

    Anybody noticed the striking similarity between this crossword and …er…one of the current big prize crosswords? I’m not sure if Radian can’t be reprimanded here: the similarities are VERY close.

  7. flashling says:

    Finished it fairly quickly but don’t see the SP in gospel. It’s also a pangram unless I’m much mistaken. Thought the musical theme would be harder than it was.

  8. Eileen says:

    Hi flashling

    SP [or OSP] stands for [obiit] sine prole, Latin for s/he died without issue – seen in genealogical records [and crosswords! :-) ]

  9. Eileen says:

    Sorry, that should be: [s/he died] without issue.

  10. nmsindy says:

    Impressive themed puzzle by Radian, I guess why it’s not been put in on a Sat is because today is I think the day, 200 years exactly since RS was born and Chopin’s similar anniversary was earlier in the year commemorated by another Indy puzzle, if I recall.

  11. Wil Ransome says:

    Can someone please explain why hug = o in 13dn? Is it that if you hug someone you vaguely make the shape of an o? If so, hm…

    Otherwise excellent. I think Chopin always looked down on Schumann, who revered Chopin. C was very sniffy about S’s piano writing. But I think he’s right.

  12. Simon Harris says:

    Hi Wil –

    I did hover over whether to try to explain that one, but wimped out. I’ve never seen it in a crossword before, but I believe ‘O’ can be used to represent a hug, much in the same way that ‘X’ can mean a kiss.

    I’ve never seen anyone over about 13 years of age use it, but I can at least cite The Urban Dictionary as, um, proof.

  13. flashling says:

    Thanks Eileen unfortunately no-one taught me Latin and in 20 years of failing to do crosswords I’d never knowingly seen it. @TNE at #6 I suspect Eimi has has more of a say for when these appear.

  14. Mike Laws says:

    A long time ago, I was sent an occasional Valentine with OXO’s (hugs and kisses) appended.

    Solution to Inquisitor 1108
    French Polish by Nutmeg
    Schumann said, of Chopin, (who had one Polish and one French parent) “Hats off, gentlemen – a genius!”. They were both born in 1810. Seven entries were gentlemen, and hats were removed from iso(topi)c, local (derby), green (beret), (lum)inants, (tam)burin, c(hat)tily and cor(tile)s.

  15. eimi says:

    I’ve checked my records and Radian submitted this puzzle on January 7, so perhaps people shouldn’t rush to judgement – to have two of the great composers born in the same year was obviously noticed by more than one person. As nmsindy has remembered correctly, Chopin’s birthday was marked with a reference on that day, so I saved this one for Schumann’s.

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