Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Everyman No. 3325 (20th June)

Posted by The Trafites on June 27th, 2010

The Trafites.

Lorraine:  Nothing to taxing this week, made sure I read the clues properly (which helps).  I was held up for a while this week as I hadn’t realised that I had spelt Altantic wrong!.

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.

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Legend to solution comments:
*  =  anagram.
<  =  word reversed.

Across
1. Behind everybody, in spite of any indications to the contrary (5,3)

AFTER ALL
dd
5.
Animal in mountain pasture, a cat with no tail (6)

ALPACA
ALP+A+CA(t)
ALP = mountain pasture
10.
It holds writer back being cack-handed (5)

INEPT
(PEN<) in IT
11.
Musical instrument broken by priest in US city (9)

KALAMAZOO
(dali) LAMA in KAZOO
12.
Retreat from mostly horrific conflict, finally (7)

HIDEOUT
HIDEOU(s)+(conflic)T
13.
Worker abroad getting financial support (7)

HANDOUT
HAND+OUT
14.
Mere hobby bringing one a return on investment (6,8)

SIMPLE INTEREST
SIMPLE+INTEREST
18.
Fish in a canal – smolt, possibly, around end of August (8,6)

ATLANTIC SALMON
((IN A CANAL – SMOLT)+(augus)T)*
20.
Fish, shad, missing head and tail (7)

HADDOCK
(s)HAD+DOCK
22.
French resort, on western end of estuary, is very good (4,3)

NICE ONE
NICE+ON+E(stuary)
24.
Daughter’s marriage in amorous play (9)

DALLIANCE
D+ALLIANCE
25.
Principal eastern US state (5)

MAINE
MAIN+E &semi-lit
26.
One regarded as mad in northern state (6)

NUTTER
N+UTTER
27.
Knee lost? Could be in this set of bones (8)

SKELETON
(KNEE LOST)*
Down
1.
Land on fire (6)
ALIGHT
dd
2.
Dreamt about problem with exercise machine (9)
TREADMILL
(DREAMT*)+ILL
3.
Proportion kept by corporation (5)
RATIO
hidden: corpoRATIOn
4.
A lot enjoy article on Victorian novelist (4,3,7)
LIKE THE DICKENS
LIKE+THE+(charles)DICKENS
nothing to do with the author, but the devil;  think ‘run like the dickens’
6.
Zest shown by former PM supporting the French on Monday (5,4)
LEMON PEEL
(robert)PEEL after LE+MON
7.
Nazi shot bearing down on old Allied landing site (5)
ANZIO
(NAZI*) on O(ld)
8.
Deserter, a Pole, put away (8)
APOSTATE
A+POST+ATE
9.
Order, on board – hold and slacken three sheets in the wind (3,5,2,4)
ALL HANDS ON DECK
(HOLD AND SLACKEN)*
15.
Pieman Tom transformed Christmas show (9)
PANTOMIME
(PIEMAN TOM)*
16.
Friedman, say, comes in to broadcast (9)
ECONOMIST
(COMES IN TO)*
17.
Murderer, casing outhouse, seized an advantage (6,2)
CASHED IN
CAIN around SHED
19.
Cut off by northern river (6)
SEVERN
SEVER+N
21.
Duke left out pottery (5)
DELFT
D+(LEFT*)
23.
Beast of burden arrived, then left (5)
CAMEL
CAME+L

4 Responses to “Everyman No. 3325 (20th June)”

  1. Nathan Jesurasingham says:

    Hi Lorraine

    Thank you for the excellent review. As you pointed out this one was not too taxing. I finished it over a couple of pints at my local club.

    However, I am really struggling with this week’s puzzle (Number 3,326). I have already spent three times longer than I did solving last week’s and I have’t even finished half of it yet. I can’t believe that two puzzles by the same compiler can vary so much in difficulty. I fear I may have to use my dictionary and thesaurus to have any hope of finishing it so I find that rather disappointing and disheartening.

  2. Huw Powell says:

    My notes on this one read “was nice to have after some hard slogs.”

    I have an Araucaria around here with about three words filled in after many attempts, around Weds. I remembered I had an Everyman lying in wait so turned to it in relief. Not only did I completely finish it, but I have no marks indicating that I didn’t follow the cryptic part. Oh wait, there is one. Tail = DOCK? Must be the 7th definition in Chambers or something… oh, I see, the 17th or so def in my Webster’s is “to remove the tail…”.

    No memory of whether I needed any aids, though. I might not have, since I see no words I didn’t previously know.

    Thanks for the blog!

  3. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thanks, Lorraine – helpful blog as always.

    Nathan, I too found this week’s puzzle on the harder side, and needed a bit of online help to finish it. But I have noticed that there are differing levels of difficulty with Everyman, which I think is a positive feature – for many people it’s the ‘entry level’ to cryptics, so once you’ve managed a few then it’s good to get a challenging one now and then.

    There were some lovely surfaces here, especially for INEPT, SIMPLE INTEREST and APOSTATE.

  4. Nathan Jesurasingham says:

    Hi Kathryn’s Dad

    Thanks for your comments. One thing I like about this website is the opportunity to learn the opinions of other solvers, which is a good thing.

    I eventually finished Everyman Number 3,326 – I solved 23 clues by myself and got the remaining 5 clues with assistance from my reference books and electronic aids so not too bad I suppose.

    On Sunday, I usually do the Everyman puzzle as well as the excellent puzzle by Brian “Virgilius” Greer in the Sunday Telegraph. I think Sunday, 27 June, was the first time ever that I completed the Sunday Telegraph puzzle more quickly than the Everyman puzzle so anyone who finished the Everyman cryptic in good time has every reason to feel pleased.

    Many thanks to Allan Scott for his puzzles and to Lorraine, Nick and Arthur for their comprehensive reviews. I look forward to this Sunday’s Everyman puzzle in the Observer.

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