Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Guardian 25,048 – Chifonie

Posted by Andrew on June 28th, 2010

Andrew.

Chifonie steps in on one of the occasional non-Rufus Mondays with a straightforward but nicely clued puzzle.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Across
1. PLAICE I in PLACE
4. TWO-BIT OB (Old Boy) in TWIT (dope). “in the US” is part of the definition, as this is an American expression.
9. ALTO Hidden
10. AMATEURISH (THE SAMURAI)*
11. KNIGHT NIGH in KT (abbreviation of “knight”). A knigt is a chess MAN.
12. IN THE RAW (HAIR WENT)*
13. PASTORALE PASTOR + ALE
15. ADZE Homophone of “adds”
16. PRAY P + RAY
17. NEWSPRINT NEW + SPRINT
21. PROSPERO PROSPER + O
22. LOVAGE A G in LOVE
24. MERIT BADGE (BRIDGE TEAM)*
25. GLAD G + LAD
26. THEORY HE in TORY
27. ATTEND A TT END
 
Down
1. POLENTA PO (river = “banker”) + LENT (provided) + A
2. AMONG MANGO*
3. COASTER Double definition – a schooner is a type of glass, which you might put on a coaster
5. WREATH E (East, bearing) in WRATH
6. BARTENDER ART in BENDER
7. TO SCALE TOSCA (opera) + LE (French “the”)
8. DANIEL DERONDA (DEALER IN AN ODD)*. Come to think of it, either of the “odd”s could be the anagram indicator, with the other being part of the fodder.
14. TRANSPIRE RAN (managed) + SP (sine prole, without issue) ir TIRE (flag)
16. PORTENT R in POTENT
18. SALIENT LIEN (legal right) in SAT (met – e.g. a court or parliament)
19. NIGGARD DRAG (yank) + GIN, all reversed. There have been controversies over this word, or its adjectival form “niggardly”, because of its similarity to another, taboo, word, but in fact they are unrelated. “Niggard” is cognate with “niggle”, both having the sense of fussing about small matters.
20. MEMBER M (Mike – phonetic alphabet) + EMBER
23. VAGUE V + AGUE

23 Responses to “Guardian 25,048 – Chifonie”

  1. Bryan says:

    Many thanks, Andrew, this was a delight!

    Somewhat trickier than our usual Monday fare and a valuable antidote to yesterday’s World Cup fiasco.

    I must try to remember the names of the German players because I am sure that they’ll appear sooner or later in one of Paul’s puzzles.

    Danke Chifonie

  2. rrc says:

    very few aha moments or smiles today -

  3. Richard says:

    Thanks for the blog, Andrew.

    I hope Chifonie will tell us where he gets drinks given to him (6dn)rather than having to buy them!

  4. Martin H says:

    11, 18 both nice clues; 2, 9 dreadful. Otherwise…..nothing much at all really.

    ‘Flower’ for a river was never a very attractive device, but at least it had the merit of being (occasionally) misleading. ‘Banker’ has no merit whatsoever – an end to it please!

  5. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thanks, Andrew – especially for the information and link on the etymology of NIGGARD. I too found this tricky, although looking back I can’t see why. KNIGHT made me smile, and I was pleased to remember sine prole after someone (Eileen, I suspect) explained it a week or two back.

    A decent enough puzzle to start the week, for me anyway.

  6. Richard says:

    I agree with Martin H about ‘Banker’.

  7. Stella Heath says:

    Thanks for the explanations, Andrew. Unlike others, I did smile a couple of times today – but then I didn’t get to watch yesterday’s match! Nicely misleading, at least for me , were 24a, where I at first tried north/south as vaguely anagramatic of scout’s honour; and 3d, where I was reminded of the first wedding I went to, and my first encounter of a schooner as a (very large) glass of sherry. I think I was under 18 at the time :-)

  8. Paul B says:

    I like bankers, which are not to be confused with greedy people who ruin world economies. Allegedly.

    The Swiss ones, inevitably, are somewhat obscure.

  9. eimi says:

    As a general point, and not a criticism of this particular crossword, I’m with the naysayers on ‘banker’ – rivers generally flow, but they don’t bank.

  10. Arfanarf says:

    17a Should this be NEWSPRINT = NEW + SPRINT rather than NEWS + SPRINT?

    But how does Extra equate to NEW? Can someone enlighten me please?

  11. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Paul B at no 8, you have reminded me of Reverend Spooner’s collective noun for bankers: a wunch.

    Sorry to all in EC whateveritis, you’re all doing a great job. Really.

  12. KennyTheBee says:

    Not the usual Monday walk in the park, but enjoyable nonetheless. Struggled with the reasoning for 1d, and 14d.

    Only got 8d from the anagram. Must read up on my English Literature – was brought up on Walter Scott, Conan-Doyle and oor Rabbie!

  13. Andrew says:

    Arfanarf – thanks for pointing out the NEWS typo: now corrected.

    NEW = EXTRA is rather loose. I can’t think of a good example off hand, but there must be times when something extra is also new…

  14. Bryan says:

    Andrew

    In the newspaper industry, an EXTRA edition is a new one containing the very latest news.

    So what’s new?

  15. Mike M says:

    I don’t really like river = BANKER, but technically it is probably correct. As the river flows around bends, the water will build up more on one side compared with the other, therefore “banking” (in the same way as runners on banked tracks run higher in the outside lanes). But I still don’t like it here….

  16. muck says:

    Thanks for the blog Andrew

    Stella Heath #7: “where I at first tried north/south as vaguely anagramatic of scout’s honour”
    I too took exactly this wrong turning at 24ac.

  17. Scarpia says:

    Thanks Andrew.
    I thought this was a pretty good puzzle,nothing too difficult but a few smiles along the way.
    A few good anagrams -10,12 and 24 across and a couple of clever misdirections.
    Tried to fit La Scala for 7 down when I,of all people,should have got Tosca straight away!
    Banker for river is o.k. by me.
    Kathryn’s Dad @ 11 – excellent!

  18. Carrots says:

    Is Chifonie really a “he”? I was going to groan loudly at one or two of the clues but, thinking the setter a lady, my chivalrous instincts demurred. I realize that Grauniad Wimmins will scoff at such chauvanism…but all I would ask is that they use their mobile phones with restraint in the First Class carriages of our railways.

  19. FumbleFingers says:

    When unions are in pay negotiations they wouldn’t differentiate between “new” and “extra” money being put on the table.

    As with many others, I think “banker” for river is way past its sell-by date (apart from maybe the very first time I met it, I’ve never thought it was much good anyway). Other than that, a competent if somewhat humdrum offering today.

  20. Ian says:

    Thanks for the blog Andrew.

    Always good to see a Chifonie puzzle in The Guardian.

    I rather enjoyed this and found it one a par with Rufus as far as degree of difficulty is concerned. Apart from ‘Banker’ in 1 dn everything clued to my satisfaction.

    25′

  21. Davy says:

    I thought this was pretty good and particularly liked 6d and 7d. I too would love to know the place where the BARTENDER gives drinks away. Thanks Chifonie.

  22. duncan says:

    I saw the solution “polenta” & deconstructed (probably because of “lent”) the p-o part as an abbreviation for “post office”, often used as a bank amongst other things. could this have been the intent, rather than the river?

    d.

  23. FumbleFingers says:

    Interesting point, duncan. I’ve always deconstructed “banker” as river, but maybe this time it wasn’t. Whatever, I still think it’s become a cliche on a par with “traveller”=REP, and should be put out to grass.

    btw – I think today’s quiptic has a lot of nice misdirectional surface readings, which more than made up for the standard cryptic being a bit light in that department.

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