Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

AZED No. 1,989 Plain

Posted by The Trafites on July 18th, 2010

The Trafites.

Nick:  A perhaps more difficult AZED this week, due to the strange grid having two words per quarter connecting each ‘mini-grid’;  for me, this made it like four very small crosswords, with the SE corner the last to go in.

6ac is a great clue, and surprisingly for AZED, no composite anagrams this week.  I am 99% certain I parsed 21dn correctly, but with the word play being so simple I am sure I missed something here; a query in 16ac;  unknown footballer in 31ac.

Legend to solution comments:
*  =  anagram.
<  =  word reversed.

Across
1.
White man bringing infection westwards, dammit! (6)
GUBBAH

(BUG<)+BAH!
Aboriginal term meaning ‘white demon’, but I can’t help thinking of a corrupted form of ‘governor’
6.
Street for kids in classes, American (6)


SESAME

hidden:  claSES AMErican
great clue, simple but deceptive
11.
Aussie tree splice lacking age (5)

MARRI

MARRI(age)
12.
College wife, victim of gout sometimes (6)

HALLUX

HALL+UX
the big toe
13.
Pain of a sort to seize troubled tutee (8)


BAGUETTE

BAG+(TUTEE*)
pain is the French word for bread
14.
Flattened e.g. third Harrovian sportsman, public school back (8, 2 words)


BLUE NOTE

BLUE+(ETON<)
the 3rd and 7th notes are flattened in the standard ‘blues’ scale of music
15.
Claw back good currency unit from China (5)

LIANG

(NAIL<)+G
16.
Half a Guarneri’s refurbished – this’ll improve bow (5)

RESIN

guar(NERIS*)
is this half of the word?  ‘resin’ means to ‘rosin’, which is applied to stringed instrument bows.
17.
Skin in t’ nudes all over the place: unable to raise enough canvas? (11)

UNDERMASTED

DERMA in (T NUDES*)
19.
Russian conspirators, debts compounded with crimes (11)

DECEMBRISTS

(DEBTS CRIMES)*
24.
Poet’s rival with success in English, hybrid (5)

EMULE

E+MULE
the poet Robert Southeys’ word
26.
Swamped major artery of blood? (5)

MIRED

M1+RED
29.
A big one drunk with dash of Drambuie, fortified in a way (8)

GABIONED

(A BIG ONE*)+D
30.
Fur flying in wild d-duel primed for a milkmaid? (8)

UDDERFUL

(FUR*) in (D-DUAL*)
I am not keen on these s-stuttering type clues
31.
Rooney’s centre with spin imparted to ball, legally positioned? (6)

ONSIDE

roONey+SIDE
Having watched the past World Cup, who on earth is Rooney? ;)
32.
One rhythmical pattern denoting something like the Vulgate (5)

ITALA

I+TALA
Latin version of the scriptures, hence Vulgate as the def.
33.
Rock cavity: fish may be trapped in one (6)

KETTLE

dd
see kiddle in Chambers
34.
Early primal substance, it may be traced back (6)

TIMELY

(YLEM+IT<)
Down
1.
Kisser exuded self-image, right? Nonsense (12)

GOBBLEDEGOOK

GOB+BLED+EGO+OK
2.
Satisfying flavour? Doubt expressed by friend (5)

UMAMI

UM+AMI
a new word for me
3.
Old rep producing denunciation about gathering of shareholders? (6)

BAGMAN

AGM in BAN
4.
Our former organization of trains of superior class in e.g. Paddington (5)

BRUIN

BR+U+IN
5.
Initially Lord Reith represented a despotic figure (6)

HITLER

L+(REITH*)
6.
Buttoned-up and thus evasive over gallantry award? (6)

SHTUMM

(THUS*)+M(ilitary) M(edal)
7.
Centre of dossal includes old linen’s artful dexterity (7)

SLYNESS

LYNES in (do)SS(al)
lynes is an old word for linen
8.
Nothing in blended malt’s delivering that distinctive welly! (6)

ALMOST

O in (MALTS*)
see welly² in Chambers
9.
Civilian by the sound of it missed centre of aim (5)

MUFTI

homophone of MUFFED+I
10.
Exchange, short, was inclined to discharge about 50 as 45? (12)

EXTENDED-PLAY

EX+TENDED+(PAY around L)
was a 45 really an EP?  As I remember, both played at 45rpm, but an EP was, well, an EP
18.
Fix boundaries of rising measure in old poem (7)

DELIMIT

(MILE<) in DIT
20.
Repeat instruction during stoppage for modern(ish) painter (6)

CUBIST

BIS(means twice) in CUT
21.
With heraldic diagonals representing Benjamin D? (6)

BENDEE

BEN DEE?
22.
Perform as second sub may on touching rising sea-water (6)


RE-EDIT

RE(=on)+(TIDE<)
sub=subeditor, so he/she could re-edit an edit
23.
Time to kill (with ball?) – amuse yourself (6)

TRIFLE

T+RIFLE
25.
Name featured in ancient sea battle location (5)

MARNE

N in MARE
27.
Mosque official with little time for millions in hadj get-up (5)


IHRAM

HR for M in IMAM (a Mosque official)
IHRAM is clothing worn to Mecca, e.g.
28.
Rival in the qualifiers (5)

EQUAL

hidden:  thE QUALifiers
like 6ac, a simple clue but cleverly disquised

8 Responses to “AZED No. 1,989 Plain”

  1. Bob Sharkey says:

    I was puzzled for a time by 10D. I remember only classical EP’s which were 33′s when I bought a few. It seems that they had a very mixed history.
    The def. is OK in my view – as 45? (adj.)
    13A was my favourite – my old French teacher had one called Alphonse. He used it for pointing, conducting – and thrashing our behinds.

  2. cholecyst says:

    Thanks, Nick. Can you explain 32 ac? I can only find ITALA = old make of Italian car.

  3. Radler says:

    I think 16ac needs to be seen as – half [a guarNERIS] – for the maths to work

  4. Gaufrid says:

    Hi cholecyst
    From Chambers:
    Itala version – a translation of the Bible into Latin, based on the ‘Old Latin’ version, and made probably in the time of Augustine.
    Vulgate – a Latin version of the Scriptures, made by St Jerome and others in the 4c, and later twice revised, so called from its common use in the Roman Catholic Church.

  5. cholecyst says:

    Thanks, Gaufrid. I knew Vulgate but not Itala, which, on your prompting, I can now find in my hard copy Chambers, which is where I should have looked in the first place instead of relying on a quick internet search!

  6. The Trafites says:

    Radler, yes I thought about ‘a guarNERIS’ myself, but I am not really happy with that; I mean where does it stop? ‘half fifteen pence’ to mean the letters ‘npence’?

    cholecyst; always check in C. With AZED, you have too.

    Nick

  7. Myrvin says:

    I agree with ‘a gaurneris’. EP definitely a 45. 21d took me ages – had BENDER for a while, which through off 33a.

  8. Bob Sharkey says:

    I omitted to mention, in connection with the disciplines of my young days, that 13A is a true &lit of a very fine quality. I call it a true &lit because it has a complete interior structure as a standard cryptic clue. I can assure all younger contributors that the pain of ‘La Baguette’ is quite distinctive, different from the cane, the slipper, the carpenter’s rule, and the length of bunsen burner hose.

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