Fifteensquared

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Azed 1990 – Troy Troy Troy again

Posted by Andrew on July 25th, 2010

Andrew.

A pretty easy Azed this week: with some judicious guessing of unfamiliar words (which one gets quite good at after solving these puzzles for several decades) I managed to finish this in less than an hour with no aids at all. On the other hand, writing up the blog has required numerous references to Chambers to confirm the details.

 
 
 
Across
1. FLOSSY F + LOSS + Y
7. BOURGS BURGOS with the O “out of place”. I can’t confirm the etymology of Burgos, but it seems likely that it comes from the same root as “bourg”, which would make this clue rather unsatisfactory.
12. LIRIPIPE I RIP in PILE*. One definition of LIRIPIPE is “a silly person”, the clue just has “silly”, as in “oh, you are a silly”.
13. VERA (A REV)< – Vera Lynn, the Forces' Sweetheart
14. WATERMEN A TERM in WEN
15. MAIDEN-TONGUED AID in MENTON + GU[I]DE*, with “not Italy” misleadingly applying to what follows.
16. PICINE PI + CINE. The word means related to the genus Picus: the woodpeckers.
17. TOSH [Macin]TOSH
19. SMUG GUMS< and two definitions: to steal (nick) and a smug person
22. DESI DESIRE less RE (rupee). Chambers defines the word as “authentically Asian”
23. SCUR [I]S CUR[T]. Scur is “same as Skirr”, which can mean to scurry, or to “beetle” (Shakespearian, so “old-style”)
24. ABURST S[hell] in A BURT
28. PLASMODESMATA MODES in (A LAMP SAT)*
30. PARIETAL IE in PART AL[L]
31. ANIS Hidden in “flockS IN Antigua” reversed &lit – the Ani is a tropical American bird
32. ASPIRE TO ISOPTERA*
33. NOSTOS A “Nostos” is a (literary) homecoming: for example the final section of Homer’s Odyssey. The wordplay almost had me stumped here, but just in time I see it’s T (= Troy, as in weight) in the reverse of SO (“in due course”, according to Chambers) + SON.
34. GLADES LADE (form of “ladel” as a verb) in G+S. As You Like It is set in the Forest of Arden, so glades might be needed for its scenery.
 
 
Down
1. FLUMP F + LUMP. Chambers confirms LUMP=dislike: I wonder if that comes from a misunderstanding of the phrase “like it or lump it”.
2. LITAI Composite anag &lit – LITAI + A HUN gives an anagram of LITHUANIA, whose unit of currency is the Litas, plural LITAI.
3. ORBICULARIS I in (RUBRIC ALSO)*
4. SINDI Homophone of “Cindy” or “Sindy” – a short form of Cynthia; and a language sdpoken in the province of Sind in Pakistan. General Sir Charles James Napier is famously supposed to have sent the punning one-word telegram “peccavi” (“I have sinned”) after capturing the province.
5. SPLENIC PL in [AR]SENIC (Chemical symbol As)
6. SPATTERDASH PATTER ‘D in SASH
7. BETOOK BET + O + OK. Past tense of “betake”, which, used reflexively, as e.g. in “betakes himself” means to go – so in the past tense “went”.
8. OXEN Hidden in cOX Enthusiastically
9. REMUNERATED M + (RUE ANTE)* in RED
10. GREENS GREEN + S
11. SANDHI DANISH*
18. SUBSOIL SUBS (advance payments) + OIL (bribe)
19. SAPPAN SA + P + PAN. Defined as “Brazil wood”, which can also be called just “Brazil”.
20. MELANO ELAN in MO
21. QUOTAS QU + (AS TO)*
25. UMBRA RUMBA with R (the “head”) moved “further down”
26. STATE T in SATE
27. TACOS O in SCAT<
29. MENO MEN + O. “Meno” is Italian for “less”, and in used is musical markings (hence “score”) such as meno mosso = less movement = slower.

7 Responses to “Azed 1990 – Troy Troy Troy again”

  1. Bob Sharkey says:

    I am relieved that you have found a convincing explanation for 5D. Not being very good at chemistry, I tried to cobble something together from ‘as’ = ‘since’. I discovered that ‘since’ could be transformed into ‘senic’ by two ‘surgical operations’, each time using one letter as a ‘scalpel’ to make an incision between two others. Stage 1: ‘i’ cuts between ‘n’ and ‘c’ to leave ‘snice’. Stage 2: ‘e’ cuts between ‘s’ and ‘n’ to leave ‘senic’. Bizarre, but true.

    I took 33A to be an &lit.

  2. Mark Toynbee says:

    Thanks for explaining some workings that I couldn’t see. I struggled with Azed this week but did finish it with some guesses and Google. I didn’t refer to Chambers. Much easier to lug the Internet around on your phone :)

  3. David Mansell says:

    7a. Burgos is a town in Spain

  4. Myrvin says:

    I finished it, but, as usual with very little idea why for several of the clues. And now I see some mistakes. Got OSCINE for 16a after FLYMO for 1d (last, desperate one in). But then I had LITAS for 2d. Sigh!

  5. cholecyst says:

    Thanks, Andrew, as you say, fairly easy.You may be correct on BOURG and BURGOS having the same root. All I can find is this: BOURG -Middle English, from Anglo-French burc, borghe, from Latin burgus fortified place, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German burg fortified place.(Webster)

    BURGOS – (a) Visigothic name … signified consolidated walled villages (Gothic baurgs)(Wikipedia).

    That’s the problem with crosswords – you fritter away time chasing down trivia!

  6. David Mansell says:

    7a. Oh come on chaps. “Nothing (= o) out of place in Spanish town (Burgos) or towns” (= bourgs, see Chambers definition of bourg). You will find Burgos,the Spanish city in Wikipedia too.

  7. Jake says:

    An excellent Azed, is there any other??? To be honest the level of difficulty here was average, not too easy and not too tough. A couple of tricky ones to boot. Favorite clue – probably 17a for it’s simplicity.

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