Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Everyman No. 3329 (18th July)

Posted by The Trafites on July 25th, 2010

The Trafites.

The Trafites:  Due to a sad week, the blog was a bit rushed today;  this in memory of my dear wife’s brother, Polly, who died on Friday.

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Legend to solution comments:
*  =  anagram.
<  =  word reversed.

Across
1. Mischievous child in difficult situation (6)
PICKLE dd
4. Liqueur, Italian, knocked back by a girl (3,5)
TIA MARIA (IT(alian)<)+A MARIA
9. Silk fabric matching it inside (6)
SAMITE IT in SAME
10. Stable one working horse (8)
STALLION STALL+I+ON
12. Look at first batsman, a revelation (3-6)
EYE OPENER EYE(look at)+OPENER(batsman)
13. Greek character – he volunteers after short time (5)
THETA HE+TA after T(ime)
14. Retrogade move giving support to protégé going on stage (8,4)
BACKWARD STEP BACK+WARD+STEP(on stage)
18. Expression up north a serf used (4,2,6)
TURN OF PHRASE (UP NORTH A SERF)*
Great misleading def. mixed with word play
21. Leader of expedition put down an antelope (5)
ELAND E+LAND
22. I approach home with sincere intentions (2,7)
IN EARNEST I+NEAR+NEST
24. Transfer diamonds in German city (4,4)
HAND OVER D(iamonds) in HANOVER
25. Muddled situation resulting from other ranks being admitted to service (6)
MORASS OR(other ranks) in MASS
26. Set off to make famous college in time (8)
DETONATE ETON in DATE
27. Lifted boa – constriction finally follows (6)
STOLEN STOLE(boa is a type of scarf)+(constrictio)N
Down
1. Eyewitness parking, bishop in Sayers novel (6-2)
PASSER BY P(parking)+(B in (sayers*))
I wonder if this an &lit, not having read any Dorothy Sayers books?
2. Pressure to keep two Frenchmen in business (8)
COMMERCE MM in COERCE
3. Drunk started smoking (3,2)
LIT  UP LIT+UP
in crossword parlance (and dictionaries), lit=drunk, but other than that I have never heard it used in any other context
5. Not earning extra money from pursuit – charitable? (8-4)
INTEREST FREE cd INTEREST(pursuit)+FREE(charitable) &lit
6. Being deciduous, they have roots (4,5)
MILK TEETH cd
milk teeth are deciduous,  falling out as they do
7. Added clause about a marauder (6)
RAIDER RIDER around A
8. One’s published yearly, the recorded events of twelve months around university (6)
ANNUAL ANNAL around U
11. Nine starting out, obstinately maintaining an attitude (12)
INTRANSIGENT (NINE STARTING)*
15. Relaxed in NI county after injury (5,4)
WOUND DOWN WOUND+(county)DOWN
16. “Foul” – audible cry in game (8)
BASEBALL BASE(foul)+homophone of BAWL
great clue
17. Nozzle is not spraying, so discard (8)
JETTISON JET+(IS NOT*)
another great clue
19. Stanislavsky’s acting technique course? (6)
METHOD dd
I had to google this, and am still not sure ‘method’ acting was S’s idea
20. Girl in car, greedy type (6)
GANNET ANNE in GT(Gran Turismo=car)
23. Dig up the earth around small hen house (5)
ROOST ROOT around S
ROOSTqqqqqqqqqqqq ROOT around S

6 Responses to “Everyman No. 3329 (18th July)”

  1. Davy says:

    Thanks for the blog and sorry to hear of your sad loss.

    Another more difficult crossword from Everyman and it took me ages to get four clues in the SE corner.
    Some excellent clues with JETTISON and BASEBALL being very well-disguised. These were two of my last four.
    A very entertaining puzzle.

  2. Nathan Jesurasingham says:

    Nick and Lorraine

    I am saddened to hear this news. May Polly Rest In Peace.

    I am sure all readers of this website appreciate your excellent blog, particularly under such tragic circumstances – thank you so much for your good work.

    A reasonably challenging puzzle from Everyman with some good clues. I never knew that the word “pickle” could refer to a mischievous child.

    I agree with Davy that JETTISON and BASEBALL were good, well-disguised clues.

    Thanks Everyman. I look forward to your next puzzle.

  3. Stella Heath says:

    Sorry for your sad news, Trafites.

    Nice puzzle, though I never heart of ‘samite’, or ‘gannet’ in this sanse, but both were easily gettable and confirmed by Chambers, so no problem.

    As well as those mentioned by others, I liked 1d and 27a. Thanks, Everyman.

  4. Kathryn's Dad says:

    I’d like to add my condolences, Nick and Lorraine, and appreciation of you letting us have your as usual comprehensive blog today.

    Some excellent clueing as always from Everyman, JETTISON and BASEBALL in particular. SAMITE and PICKLE in the sense of a mischievous child were new to me, but I’ve known GANNET for ‘a glutton’ since I was very young. I suppose it comes from the bird’s aggressive way of capturing fish, plunging into the sea from great height and gobbling up its unsuspecting prey; or maybe just from its voracious appetite.

  5. Peter Mabey says:

    Sorry to hear the sad news, and thanks for still doing the blog in spite of all.

    SAMITE at once brought to mind The Lady of the Lake “clothed in white samite…”, whilst one of my former colleagues was nicknamed GANNET (from his practice of finishing off the leftovers at our table in the canteen ;-) ).

  6. The Trafites says:

    Really weird that nobody has heard of a mischievous child as a ‘pickle’, as my Nan used to call us little ‘pickles’ and my sister Dolly use to call her son a little ‘pickle’. I thought it might be Portsmouth slang but Nick had never heard of it either, and had to consult Chambers. I wonder where it comes from then?

    Thanks to everyone for all your words of comfort.

    Lorraine.

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