Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Everyman No. 3339 (26th September)

Posted by The Trafites on October 3rd, 2010

The Trafites.

Lorraine:  I must admit I struggled slightly this week due to being a tad hungover from the Azed luncheon in Oxford.  Excellent puzzle as always.  I particularly liked 3dn, good anagram.  Thank you Everyman.

Legend to solution comments:
*  =  anagram.
<  =  word reversed.

Across
1. Unduly led astray by star for so long (6-3)
TOODLE PIP TOO+(LED*)+PIP
6.
Drank regularly round base (5)

DEPOT (TOPED)<
9.
It’s more than likely this’ll give you a good run for your money (4-2,9)

ODDS ON FAVOURITE sort of cd
10.
Sympathetic cheering (6)

GENIAL dd
11.
Knife fight about cash register with one pound missing (8)

STILETTO TIL(l) in SET-TO
13.
Lie in bed, poorly, not fit enough to eat (8)

INEDIBLE (LIE IN BED)*
14.
The pair answer a South African politician (5)

BOTHA BOTH+A(nswer)
17.
Father embracing sapper, 22 (5)

DREAD DAD around RE ref: 22ac
18.
A setter barking round end of rose bushes (3,5)

TEA TREES (A SETTER + (ros)E)*
20.
Spelunkers sheltering notice corpses (8)

CADAVERS AD in CAVERS
22.
Troublesome child, last to admit mistake (6)

TERROR T+ERROR
24.
Two articles about unseen spymaster in film (3,9,3)

THE INVISIBLE MAN (THE+AN) around INVISIBLE M (james bonds’ boss)
25.
Poor performer spending time with teacher (5)

RABBI RABBI(t)
rabbit=an inferior player at golf, cricket etc.
26.
Orchid exposed by peeress (5,4)

NAKED LADY NAKED(exposed)+LADY
Down
1.
Right in grip of hard depression (6)

TROUGH R in TOUGH
2.
One restricted by guns regulation (9)

ORDINANCE I in ORDNANCE
3.
Vindaloo and rice prepared for a famous painter (8,2,5)

LEONARDO DA VINCI (VINDALOO AND RICE)*
nice anagram
4.
Seabird’s lost in gust (4)

PUFF PUFF(in)
5.
Pedestrianise, to make progress easier? (4,3,3)

PAVE THE WAY dd
6.
Ambiguous, like Sackville-West? (6-9)

DOUBLE BARRELLED example definition type clue & dd
7.
Suggest a tip (5)

POINT dd
8.
Abstemious count after support (8)

TEETOTAL TOTAL(count) after TEE(support)
12.
A cleansing process alien to Serbians (10)

ABSTERSION (TO SERBIANS)*
15.
Teacher confused about one mass, a peninsula (3,6)

THE CRIMEA (TEACHER*) around I M(ass)
16.
Teacher courted a disaster (8)

EDUCATOR (COURTED A)*
19.
Alcoholic drink, make unknown (6)

BRANDY BRAND Y (as opposed to brand x)
21.
Boring type starts to discuss weatherman’s early evening broadcast (5)

DWEEB leading letters
23.
Cream plectrum? (4)
PICK dd

10 Responses to “Everyman No. 3339 (26th September)”

  1. AJK says:

    Hi, Lorraine. Nice to meet you and Nick at the AZED lunch. Yes, Everyman seems to be a bit tougher of late. I agree 3d was terrific, but 6d was good too.

  2. The Trafites says:

    Hi Andrew, yes it was lovely to meet you also, nice to put a face to the name. I agree that Everyman seems to have stepped up the pace some what, I believed Everyman to be the puzzle for cryptic virgins, but not so sure about that now. Although I finish the puzzle every Sunday morning I am finding that the old grey matter is being worked much harder than it used to be. Regards, Lorraine.

  3. Huw Powell says:

    I liked 13A, INEDIBLE, for some reason. I can’t remember how this puzzle worked for me except that it seems to be fully solved when I pull it out.

  4. PeterO says:

    One quibble: in 26A, the naked lady in question is generally colchichum , the autumn crocus, which is not an orchid. I could find the name referring to other plants, none of which seems to be an orchid. Perhaps Everyman had in mind ladies clothed, at least in slippers.

  5. The Trafites says:

    PeterO, Collins defines ‘naked lady’ as “a leafless pink orchid found in Australia and New Zealand“.

  6. PeterO says:

    … that is, at least in slippers.

  7. PeterO says:

    TT – we crossed. Thanks for the information, I do not have Collins, and had not come across that one.

  8. PeterO says:

    Curious. A google of ‘naked lady orchid’ provides a large number of hits, most of which seem more interested in naked ladies than orchids, but only two obvious relevant entries. One references Collins, and the other also uses the identical wording, with no more information; yet the same search readily provided a botanical name and photos for the naked man orchid. It is hardly surprising a common name applied to several plants, and the naked bit would indicate that the flower, like the colchicum (to spell it correctly this time) now in bloom outside my window, does not have leaves, although in the case of the colchicum it will come up with some later.

  9. Stella Heath says:

    Thanks Lorraine, and Peter O for the information on orchids and other flora.

    I agree, this was slightly tougher than the usual Everyman, with a couple of new words (12d and 21d), and a new acception for a very familiar one – ‘rabbit’.

    As always, though, soundly clued and enjoyable. Thanks, Everyman.

  10. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thank you, Lorraine. As I’ve said before, I like the way you produce the blog because it reminds me of the puzzle, which one week on has normally found its way into the recycling.

    Enjoyable and well-clued as always from Everyman. RABBIT is certainly well-known to cricketers, Stella – a lower-order batsman who can’t really bat for his life. Not sure where it comes from, though – maybe from that startled expression that rabbits give you when you catch them in the headlights before trying to swerve and avoid producing a further item of roadkill.

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