Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Financial Times 13,507 – Falcon

Posted by Uncle Yap on October 14th, 2010

Uncle Yap.

Monday Prize Crossword on 4 October 2010
Not the usual week-opening breeze this time since Falcon had a couple of hard-boiled eggs which I could not fully understand without help from my occasional maestro consultant, Dr Ivan Reid.

ACROSS
1 THOROUGH Ins of O (nothing) in THROUGH (between)
5 HARDUP Cha of HARD (difficult) UP (at university)
9 IDENTIFY dd
10 CARBON Cha of CAR (vehicle) B (barrels) ON – transfer paper or tracing-paper; a banknote ; reporters’ copy written on thin paper; a (carbon) copy on thin paper… Chambers
11,16 BLOT ONE’S COPYBOOK cd
12 FABRIC FAB (fabulous or excellent) RICH (good opportunity for laughter) minus H
18,14 TWO CAN PLAY AT THAT GAME self-explanatory
22 PSYCHO *(P C HOY’S)
23 ASPIRATE Cha of AS (like) PIRATE (illegal broadcaster) The French don’t alluded to the fact that in the French language, aspiration (pronouncing the h sound fully) is a rarity. Thank you, Dr Reid for this gem. While looking up pirate radio stations, I am surprised that there are still so many in operation. During my time in the UK, Luxembourg and Capital were my favourites.
24 AVOCET AVO (rev of OVA. eggs) CE (Church of England) T (last letter of priesT)
25 HANG FIRE Cha of HANG (deck as in decorate) FIRE (Conflagration) – to be a long time in exploding or discharging, caused by a variety of reasons like imperfect fuse or bullet
26 DAKOTA Ins of KO (rev of OK, fine) in DATA (facts)
27 VERY WELL VERY (so) WELL (advisable)

DOWN
1 TRILBY dd Trilby (1894) is a novel by George du Maurier and a soft felt hat with an indented crown and narrow brim
2 OBERON ha The name Oberon was chosen for the outermost natural satellite of the planet Uranus in 1847, as an homage to William Shakespeare and his literary character.
3 OPTION OP (opus, work) + ins of I (one) in TON (fashion)
4 GAFFER TAPE cd
6 ATALANTA Ins of A (article) in ATLANTA (US state capital) The def alluded to this lady in Greek mythology who, when asked by her father to marry, agreed if any man, in full battle gear could outrun her. Many failed and died until Melanion came along with Aphrodite’s help. Whenever Atalanta came near to overtaking, he dropped one of three golden apples which she stopped to pick up. He won the race, married her and lived happily ever after.
7,8 DOBERMAN PINSCHER *(breed Cornishman P)
13 CHEAPSKATE Cha of CHEAP (inexpensive) SKATE (fish)
15 STOPPARD Cha of STOP (stay) PARD (slang form of partner) Sir Tom Stoppard (born 1937) is an influential British playwright, knighted in 1997. He has written prolifically for TV, radio, film and stage, finding prominence with plays such as Arcadia, The Coast of Utopia, Every Good Boy Deserves Favour, Professional Foul, The Real Thing, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. He co-wrote the screenplays for Brazil and Shakespeare in Love and has won one Academy Award and four Tony Awards
17 TASHKENT Ins of H (hospital) in TASK (job) + ENT (ear, nose & throat, a department in a hospital)
19 DINGHY Ins of H (husband) in DINGY (discoloured)
20 MALICE M (married) ALICE (woman)
21 REVEAL RE (2/3 of REd) VEAL (meat)

Key to abbreviations
dd = double definition
dud = duplicate definition
tichy = tongue-in-cheek type
cd = cryptic definition
rev = reversed or reversal
ins = insertion
cha = charade
ha = hidden answer
*(fodder) = anagram

2 Responses to “Financial Times 13,507 – Falcon”

  1. Sil van den Hoek says:

    Thank you, Uncle Yap, for your eminent blog.
    In fact, that’s basically what I wanted to say [I have nothing to add to puzzle as such].
    Everything’s very well clued, slightly harder than usually on a Monday, and there’s certainly, let’s say, a factor 3 compared to Mr Allan’s alter ego Everyman – the one we all love.

  2. bamberger says:

    Failed on 9a, 23a,27a, 3d,6d & 20d.
    6d I’d considered atlanta as the state capital but couldn’t make the jump.
    20d I’m sure that must be a gimme for the experienced.
    23a I had thought of pirate numerous times which meant it would be aspirate but couldn’t see any connection with the French so didn’t write it in.

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