Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 7,492 by Dac

Posted by Simon Harris on October 20th, 2010

Simon Harris.

Goodness, this was a bit more of a bruising than I expected today. In fact I really struggled, resorting first to “Reveal Letter” and eventually to “Reveal” simply to get this post filed at a reasonable time. I’ve done my best to explain things, but I’m sure there are some gaps for commenters to fill.

*=anag, []=dropped, <=reversed, hom=homophone, cd=cryptic definition, dd=double definition.

Across
1 AGUE – [pr]AGUE.
4 ROMAN A CLEF – (FOR MACLEAN)*.
9 POMPOM – POMP + OM.
10 SUPERTAX – SUP + EXTRA*.
11 INDEFINITELY – IN + DEFINITELY.
13 ABUSED – A + BUS + ED.
14 ASSENTOR – ASS + ETON + [headmaste]R.
16 FIREARMS – IRE in FARMS.
18 AVESTA – A + VESTA. Apparently the primary collection of sacred texts of Zoroastrianism, composed in the Avestan language.
19 INTRANSIGENT – IN TRANSI[t] + GENT.
22 COTENANT – NOTE* in CANT.
23 ELATED – [r]ELATED.
24 LADY CHAPEL – LAD + (CHAP in YE) + L.
25 TATI – TAT + I.
Down
2 GROUNDBAIT – (BOAT DURING)*. Probably unfamiliar to most non-anglers, such as myself, but quite solvable once the anagram is spotted.
3 EXPRESS DELIVERY – PRESS in (EX + DELIVERY), I think, but is “shop” really “delivery”?
4 REMAINDER – (MAIN[e] in RED) + RE<, I think.
5 MESSINA – MESS + IN A.
6 NAPPE – this totally beat me. The def. is “rock”, since this is a large mass of rock thrust a considerable distance along a nearly horizontal fault plane or in an overturned anticlinal fold, but I don’t know who the musician is.
7 CARRY ON SERGEANT – (ACTOR’S ENERGY RAN)*.
8 EDAM – (MAD + E)<.
12 CONTINGENT – G in CONTINENT.
15 STAR SHELL – (TAR in SS) + HELL.
17 START UP – STAR TUP. Very clever, it took me ages to see this one. A “tup” is an uncastrated male sheep.
20 TEACHT + EACH.
21 CODA – COD + A.

10 Responses to “Independent 7,492 by Dac”

  1. Conrad Cork says:

    Nappe is a hidden word in ‘musician appears’.

  2. jmac says:

    3dn is “deli + very”

  3. jmac says:

    AVESTA defeated me. Thought START UP was great. Thanks for the blog Simon.

  4. scchua says:

    Thanks for the blog, Simon, and Dac for an enjoyable crossword.

    Was going to explain 3D EXPRESS DELIVERY = EX + PRESS + DELI (“shop”) + VERY (“really”) but jmac beat me to it. Anyway it was one of my favourite clues together with the long anagram 7D CARRY ON SERGEANT.

    The one that got away was 25A TATI – I got the TAT part but wasn’t familiar with the film maker (also misled by thinking “independent” was describing him).

  5. flashling says:

    Just finished, but beaten to the missing bits by Conrad and Jmac. Rather more difficult than DAC of late but I don’t think that’s a bad thing. Well done on the blog Simon.

  6. nmsindy says:

    Thanks for the blog, Simon, and Dac for the puzzle. I too found this a little tougher than Dac usually is, favourite clue NAPPE. I enjoyed Jacques TATI’s films a long time ago, and he lives on in the crossword world esp cos of his friendly letters I guess. CARRY ON SERGEANT I knew all about too, having seen it when it first came out to start that series off.

  7. Lenny says:

    This was a gentle solve but it was elegantly clued by Dac. The three words I did not know were eminently gettable from the wordplay: Avesta, Star shell and Nappe. I have to admit that I got nappe from the definition since it is French for tablecloth. I imagined that Napper Somebody-or –other must be a rock drummer. Thanks, Simon and thanks to Conrad for pointing out the obvious for us.

  8. Kathryn's Dad says:

    I was reflecting the other day over a beer with a fellow crozzie fan that there’s probably a window of opportunity to really appreciate cryptics: you have to be old enough to remember all the references from the 60s, 70s and so on, but not be so old that you’ve gone gaga and can’t do the cryptic bit. This theory was holding out for me in the last few months, but I’ve now realised that there’s another part to the equation – you have to have eyesight good enough to read the clues.

    Unusually, I did the puzzle in the paper today; I saw that 6dn was a hidden answer, thought I recognised the solution and put in NAPPA because that’s what I read. This banjaxed me for the other solutions in the NE corner.

    However, finally resolved that problem and finished. Super puzzle as always from Dac; favourite clues INDEFINITELY, TATI and POMPOM, but there were several others that I could have chosen.

    Thanks for the blog, Simon.

  9. Pete Maclean says:

    I found this rather difficult and did not find time to finish it. I like the TATI clue being a huge fan of old Jacques. And of course I love 4A.

  10. Allan_C says:

    Yes, more difficult than usual for Dac, but not impossible; no electronic help needed, but some recourse to the dictionary to confirm one’s guesses.

    Great clue at 4a: at first sight ‘novel’ appears to be the anagrind. Actually, ‘novel’ could almost do duty as both definition and anagrind without the need for ‘collection’, but Ximeneans would doubtless not approve.

    K’s D, it’s fine being old enough to remember the references from the 60s and 70s but then you find you don’t know some of those from the ‘yoof culture’ of the 80s and 90s. Swings and roundabouts, I suppose.

    Appropriate that CODA should be the last clue.

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