Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Inquisitor 1148 – Trial by Schadenfreude – 16 October 2010

Posted by duncanshiell on October 27th, 2010

duncanshiell.

The preamble told us that one letter or word must be removed from each clue before it can be solved.  In clue order the removals provide a quotation related to an event which occurred 50 years ago.  1/43, 16/10 and 31/40/14 are unclued.  Solvers must highlight the two thematic characters occupying a total of 12 squares.  Treated clues consist only of real words but seldom make any literal sense.

There was lot going on in this crossword, but I made steady progress from the start.  Fairly early on, I could see the makings of LAWRENCE down the rightmost column.  The title of the puzzle was TRIAL so it wasn’t too much of a leap to consider the obscenity trial involving D H LAWRENCE‘s book LADY CHATTERLEY’S LOVER which ran at the Old Bailey from 20 October to 2 November 1960.  The defendant, Pebguin Books, was acquitted and the book went on to head the best sellers’list for some time.  Each of LADY CHATTERLEY’S LOVER (1/43) and DAVID HERBERT LAWRENCE (16/10) and MERVYN GRIFFITH-JONES (31/40/14) form the unclued entries.

During the trial the Chief Prosecuting Counsel MERVYN GRIFFITH-JONES uttered the wonderful quote revealed by the extra letters and words in the clues:

IS IT A BOOK YOU WOULD EVEN WISH YOUR WIFE OR YOUR SERVANTS TO READ?

The main characters were Lady Constance Chatterley (CONNIE) and the gamekeeper Oliver MELLORS, both of whom are hidden in the grid,  CONNIE diagonally south west from the first letter of 15 across and MELLORS upward from the first letter of 31 across.  There are only 12 cells involved as the O does double duty, once in each character.

I enjoyed the puzzle, but I think the title and the preamble together provided too obvious a clue to the theme.   If I had I really thought about it, I could have entered ‘trial October 1960‘  into Google before I started to solve the puzzle. If I had done, I would have found that three of the first ten suggestions referred to the Lady Chatterley trial.

L A D Y C H A T T E G J R
O B O V O I D S O V I E T
N O N J U R O R C O R A L
D M E O L E R O S E O L A
A B A N D O N L I E L O W
V O T E E N S L N B L U R
I C A S I C K E S T E S E
D E N E M E I M E R V Y N
H A N A P S N E R I T I C
E N A V A N T A E F S K E
R A T A N G R I F F I T H
B U T L E R A L E V E L S
E T O R L E Y S L O V E R

 

Like all Schadenfreude’s puzzles, the clueing was tight and each clue parses unambiguously.

I was very taken with the way Schadenfreude split the quotation into letters and words.  The words were impressive, particularly, 35d STORE which contributed to three words SERVANTS TO READ.

New words for me this week included VOTEEN, HANAPS, OCEANAUT and REFEL

To solve the puzzle one needed a passing knowledge of, or were required to do some research into hip-hop culture, geography, jurisprudence, Irish words, education, slang, French, cooking, and ornithology among other topics. I reckon I have learnt a huge amount over the years just from doing crosswords. Of course, how much of it I retain is another matter.

Across
No. Letter/Word Wordplay Entry
11 I : I like … OBOL (Greek money [bread], excluding [not] L [left]) + VOID (empty) OBOVOID (egg-shaped; like some eggs)
12 S : As council …. Anagram of (looms) (VOTES and I [independence]) SOVIET (council)
13 IT : it upset our queen ….. NO (denial) + N (new) + J (judge) + anagram of (upset) OUR + R (queen) NONJUROR (a person who refuses to swear allegiance)
15 A : Mean boy …. C (Catholic) + OR (other ranks; men) + AL (boy’s name) CORAL (girl’s name)
17 B : Brash giunners …. RA (Royal Artillery; gunners) containing (crossing) an anagram of (ground) LOOSE ROSEOLA (rash)
18 O : … subject to droop A + BAND (connecting piece) + ON (subject to) ABANDON (drop)
20 O : Whopper on float … LIE (whopper) + LOW (flat, in musical terminology) LIE LOW (remain hidden)
21 K : … to seek retired … (TO + V [see]) reversed (retired) + E (English) + EN (enrolled nurse) VOTEEN (Irish word meaning devotee; Irish fan)
24 Y : Fuzzy bass … B (bass) + LUR (trumpet) BLUR (fuzz)
26 O : Worst coat is French SICK (cat, in the sense of ‘to vomit’) + EST (French for ‘is’) SICKEST (worst)
29 U : Half an emu (D [deserted] + E [eastern]) containing EN (a printers’ measurment that is half an em) DENE (valley)
32 WOULD :  … people would like … HAN (native Chinese people) + (AS [like] containing [to possess] P [first letter {original}] of PEKING) HANAPS (goblets)
33 EVE : Eve cultivated … Anagram of (cultivated) RICE IN and T (temperature) NERITIC (belonging to shallow waters)
36 N : A Finn turned … (A + VANE [fin]) reversed (turned back) + NT (not) EN AVANT (forward)
39 W : … to secure win RAN (managed) containing (to secure) AT (in) RATAN (alternative spelling of rattan, a climbing palm; climber)
41 I : … to complete ruin L (left) contained in (in) (BUT [an outer room or kichen of a house] + E [last letter of {close to} COMPLETE] + R [run]) BUTLER (servant – would you want him to read this book?)
42 S : About seven special … A (about) + LEVEL (even) + S (special) A-LEVELS (examinations)

 

Down
No. Letter/Word Wordplay Entry
2 H : Lots of hackers … A + BOMB (lots of ackers [money]) A-BOMB (atomic bomb; a destructive device)
3 Y : … getting drunk early D (director) + ON (drunk) + E (earl) DONE (finished)
4 OUR : Was our able university … (U [university] + L [lecturer]) contained in (eaten by) COD (fish) COULD (was able)
5 W : Wages won by …. HIS (excluding the final letter [brief] S) + RE (on) HIRE (wages)
6 IF : If decks are clean … A (are [metric measure of area]) + DO (clean) + RN (the Navy) + S (succeeded) ADORNS (decks)
7 E : Is Eton worried … Anagram of (is worried) IS TON containing (about) CS (an irritant gas used in riot control) TOCSINS (alarms)
8 OR : …ordinary or English … Anagram of (cooked) GRILL and O (ordinary) + E (English) GIROLLE (chanterelle mushroom)
9 YOU : … I accepted you with … JE (French [in Paris] for I) + A (accepted) + LOUSY (rotten) JEALOUSY (envy)
19 R : Joker taking cocaine … ONE (joke) containing (taking) C (cocaine) ONCE (on one occasion)
22 S : … reportedly sought after … Anagram of (wrecked) CANOE + AUT (sounds like [reportedly] ought) OCEANAUT (submarine explorer)
23 E : …accommodating madame LEE (shelter) containing (accommodating) M (madam) LEME (a gleam of light)
25 R : Rat with not an … Anagram of (unusual) AT NOT AN ANNATTO (a bright orange colouring matter)
27 V : … in live broadcast … (MAN [soldier] containing [keeping] P [positive]) all contained in (in) an anagram of (broadcast) LIE IMPANEL (to select from list)
28 A : Deaf rector interrupting … R (rector) contained in (interrupting) TIFF (argument) TRIFF (terrific, excellent – ‘def’ means excellent or brilliant in hip-hop culture)
30 N : … to trustee? Never IN (belonging to) + TR (trustee) + AY (ever) IN-TRAY (a container for letters)
34 T : … on wing told to … REF (referee; match official) + EL (a wing giving a building the shape of the letter L) REFEL (obsolete [old] word meaning ‘refure’)
35 STORE : … in the empty store IS + (L [left] contained in [in] TE [the first and last letters of {empty}] THE) ISTLE (fibre)
37 A : Bairds’s short of … RAIL’S (a rail is a bird) excluding (short of) R (resistance) AILS (troubles)
38 D : Somewhat starved I … Reversed (up) hidden word (somewhat) in …STARVE I KNOCK… KIEV (fried meat dish, e.g. Chicken Kiev)

4 Responses to “Inquisitor 1148 – Trial by Schadenfreude – 16 October 2010”

  1. Mike Laws says:

    The first reaction to this puzzle was:

    Mike, a quotation etched in the brain of every barrister of a certain age, along with (prosecuting counsel cross-examining truck driver in a drunken driving case) “Are you sure you didn’t have even the teeny-weeniest sherry before luncheon?” and (defence counsel’s closing speech to a Norfolk jury) “Be sure not to fall into the fallacy post hoc, ergo propter hoc”.

    I thoroughly enjoyed it. Apart from the puzzle’s quality, it brought back memories of forking out 3/6 for the book at the time,aged 14!

  2. HolyGhost says:

    As Duncan says, not too challenging a puzzle. (Or are we just getting better?)

    Re 26A: Is it only Schadenfreude who uses “cat” to clue SICK or VOMIT? He’s done it before and I am aware of no others that have.

  3. Hi of Hihoba says:

    I don’t know the origin of “cat” for vomit, but it occurs in the wonderful “Stalky and Co” by Kipling. I remember having to look it up at the time (a very long time ago!).
    “Oh, Stalky, you are a fool!”
    “Je cat, tu cat, il cat. Nous cattons! …. We’re a limited liability company payin’ four per cent. My father’s a shareholder, …”

  4. Ali says:

    I’ve definitely seen the cat/vomit thing used before. Azed used it in his recent 2000 puzzle I think

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