Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Azed 2004

Posted by Andrew on October 31st, 2010

Andrew.

Another Azed that I managed to complete almost all of quite quickly without references, though with some educated guesswork based on many years of finding obscure words in Chambers. Still, it’s none the worse for that, with the usual combination of wit and deviously elegant wordplay.

Across
1. BUST-UP BUS + PUT<
6. HAFFET FE (Iron) in HAFT. “Temple” here is as in part of the head.
12. TANTUM ERGO (TEM[ple] RANG OUT)*
13. TRACHEA RAC in THE A
14. HIPT P (soft) in HIT (belt). The word is a variant past tense of HIP, meaning (in America, apparently) “to carry on the hip”. Whether it refers to guns or to small children, Chambers does not say.
15. DETEST DE (French “some”) + TEST
16. FLY FRONT “run from van” = “FLY the FRONT”. “Fly” is a synonym of the more usual “flee”.
18. NASTY N A STY
19. LEWDLY W + D in LELY
21. GLIOMA Hidden in seraGLIO MAiden. It’s “a tumour of the neuroglia in the brain and spinal cord”.
24. PILOW PI (mixture of types) + LOW – Chambers gives “(of latitude) near the equator”. A variant of PILAU (and other spellings)
26. SOCIETAL (S COALITE)* The definition is “Company’s”, i.e. “of company”.
27. RUNKLE [D]RUNK + LE[FT]
29. HUGO HUG + O. The novelist is Victor Hugo, of course.
30. FISHNET (THE FINS)* &lit.
31. SANDERLING SANDER + LING. Sander, aka zander, is defined as a “food-fish”. I don’t think I’ve ever knowingly eaten Ling, but it’s a member of the Cod family. The sanderling is a species of sandpiper.
32. STEINS Reference to the famous Steins Rick (chef) and Gertrude (writer); and STEINs are tankards that might be raised in a German beer cellar.
33. EMPERY (Not the synonymous EMPIRE, which I carelessly put in at first). MP in EERY
 
Down
1. BATHING DRESS     ([bi]G BERTHA’S DINS)*. The surface reading suggests references to the guns at World War I, and Bikini Atoll, site of nuclear tests, but really we’re talking about swinning costumes old and new(er).
2. UPRISAL RI (Relligious Instruction) in PAUL’S*
3. STAPES P[roblem] in SEATS<
4. UNHOLY (YOU + L[u]N[c]H)*
5. PTERYLAE PTE + EARLY*
7. AMPERE [T]AMPERE[D]
8. FELT This took me a while to work out: “one such” gives BAT, which can be “a layer of felt used in hat-making”; and FELT=”was affected emotionally”.
9. FRIEND F + RIEN (French “nothing” = love, as in tennis) + D. “Lover” is an old meaning of “friend”.
10. EGEST Hidden in collEGE’S Tearways.
11. TOOTSY-WOOTSY TOO (extremely) + WOO[d] in STY* twice. It’s a childish word for a finger or toe, as in the “this little piggy went to market” rhyme.
17. FLAT FILE LIFT< in LEAF*. Chambers defines FLAT FILE as "a file without hypertext links", but that isn’t a good definition. I'll spare you the nerdy details.
20. LOW GEAR G[reats] in (LAW OR E)* , with the anagram indicated by “what [it] schools”. First and second are examples of low gears,
22. IONONE NO-NO< in I.E. The word comes from "ion", which is Greek for violet – nothing to do with the chemical "ion" (which comes from the Greek verb "to go")
23. MILDEN LD (lethal dose) in MIEN (air)
24. PASSIM ASS in IMP*
25. LOUNGE O in LOUNGE. An easy clue that I had trouble with after my earlier carelessness with 33ac.
26. SURAT RA replaces I in SUIT. Surat is “coarse uncoloured cotton; anything that is of inferior quality”, so “any old tat”.
28. KADI Reverse of DAK (Indian word for post, in the sense of mail) + I. Kadi (or Cadi) is an Islamic judge.

One Response to “Azed 2004”

  1. cholecyst says:

    Thanks Andrew. As you suggest, fairly straightforward. But I wasn’t too happy with 32ac. More than one STEIN in a Bierkeller would surely be STEINE?

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