Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Guardian Quiptic nº 575, by Pan

Posted by Stella on November 22nd, 2010

Stella.

An entertaining puzzle from Pan, with some delightful surfaces and a variety of resources.

ACROSS

1. ARMISTICE

Charade of AR(ab) + I(n) C(harge) in an anagram of *TIMES

6.  CREAM

Charade of E(xtasis)=’drug’ in CRAM=’pack’

9. CARER

Charade of  CARE(e)R – the last letter (‘end’) of life, for a nurse as a carer.

10. PUTREFIED

Charade of PUT = ‘place’ + REF = ‘arbitrator’ + anagram of *DIE, indicated by ‘horribly’

11. TRAMPOLINE

Anagram of *ARM+TOE+LIP around N(oon)

12. DELI

Homophone of Delhi (=’city’)

14. CLANGER

Charade of C(ardina)L – ‘disembowelled’ – + ANGER =one of the seven deadly sins

15. APOSTLE

Charade of POST = ‘office’ in ALE =’beer’. The definition ‘supporter of new system’ is somewhat unusual, I think

17. ELEVATE

Charade of E(astern)+LEVE around AT, indicated by ‘scoffed’. I presume ‘leve’ is some form of currency, though my Chambers gives ‘lev’ as a Bulgarian unit of currency, and I can find no other reference. Thanks to Big Dave for pointing out that this is in fact ATE = ‘scoffed’ after (indicated by ‘at’) E(astern) + LEV.

19. SCENERY

Charade of (Mo)SC(ow) – ‘central characters’ + ENER(g)Y (=power) minus ‘g’ for ‘government

20. NAAN

Charade of NAN = ‘relative’ around (indicated by ‘swallows) A, for this Indian bread:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naan

22. WOOLWORTHS

Charade of WOO = ‘court’ + L(iquidate), indicated by ‘beginning to’ + anagram of *THROWS, indicated by ‘out’. I didn’t know this chain store was ‘defunct’.

25. BLADDERED

Charade of BED = ‘resting place’ around LADDER = ‘something to climb’, giving us an adjective which I’ve never heard, but with obvious meaning, although ‘drunk’ is more often used in crosswords to indicate anagram fodder.

26. IDEAL

Charade of I = ‘one’ + DEAL = ‘portion’

27. LEDGE

Charade of L = ‘Flintoff’s second (letter)’ + EDGE = ‘boundary’

28. PREVENTED

Charade of PR(ince) + EVEN = ‘stable’ + TED = boy’s name (‘lad’)

DOWN

1. ASCOT

Hidden in ‘NovA SCOTia’

2. MARMALADE

Anagram of *LAME DRAMA, in a lovely surface which made me smile

3. STRIPOGRAM

Charade of S(econd) + TRIP = ‘outing’ + O(utgoin)G, indicated by ‘extremely’ + RAM = ‘male animal

4. IMPALER

Charade of I’M = ‘setter’s’ + PALER = ‘not as ruddy’, and &lit for Vlad the Impaler, the infamous ruler who inspired the Dracula myth

5. ESTONIA

Charade of E(uro) + anagram of *AIN’T SO, indicated by ‘bothered’

6. CREW

Charade of CR(edit) + E(ast) + W(est) = ‘two (compass) points’, a common device, along with ‘bridge partners’

7. ELITE

Hidden in ‘caramEL ITEm, indicated by ‘contains’. The defintion is ’6 across’, as in ‘la crème de la crème’

8. MIDWIFERY

Anagram of *I DEFY MR with WI (= ‘Women’s Institute’). Another nice surface.

13. POPEMOBILE

Charade of PILE = ‘mass’ around anagram of *POEM + O(ld) B(oy), for yet another

14. CHERNOBYL

Charade of CHERYL = ‘girl’(‘s name) around NOB = ‘bigwig’, indicated by ‘takes’

16. TREATMENT

CCharade of (River) TRENT around anagram of *MATE

18. EGO TRIP

Anagram of *GOT PIER, indicated by ‘redeveloped’

19. SPLODGE

Last letter of ‘ignoramuS’ plus the first of ‘Philosophy’ + LODGE = stick

21. AWARD

Chrade of A + <DRAW reversed, indicated by ‘rejected’

23. SALAD

Charade of LAD = ‘boy’ after S(alvation) A(rmy)

24. IDLE

Hidden in ‘horrID LEeds’, which didn’t please me too much, Leeds being my English ‘alma mater’ :)

8 Responses to “Guardian Quiptic nº 575, by Pan”

  1. Big Dave says:

    Thanks for the review Stella

    17a is ATE (scoffed) at (by / after) E(astern) and LEV (currency of Bulgaria) – I don’t like hyphens being added just to improve the surface reading

    4d I didn’t think this was &Lit (definition described by the whole clue)

    Also I think some of your charades are better inicated as insertions of deletions.

  2. Stella says:

    Thanks for that, Dave. I’m still learning.

  3. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thank you for an informative blog, Stella.

    I liked POPEMOBILE and STRIPOGRAM, but there were other good clues to enjoy. WOOLWORTHS is one you wouldn’t appreciate if you haven’t lived in Blighty for a bit.

    PREVENTED is pretty obvious once you’ve got some crossing letters, but I’m not a big fan of the ‘boy’ = ‘ted’ device to indicate an abbreviation of a man’s name. I know some big people that are called Ted.

    Overall, a good puzzle for less experienced solvers, I thought.

  4. Derek Lazenby says:

    Sorry no comments recently, been doing that chemo I mentioned. But I’m back! Did you have to all groan?

    Well, I didn’t finish this by about 20%. For me to say that, who has been working his way through the archives with a sub 30 minute expectation, means this clearly was not a Quiptic. Having said that, I might have done better if my brain didn’t feel quite so fuzzy still. Having looked at the blog though, I’m not sure a clear mind would have helped.

    Who, for example, ever says BLADDERED? Which little social clique does this come from?

  5. Stella says:

    Interesting comment, Derek. Certainly it’s not an adjective that would ever have occurred to me, but one of the things about crosswords is that you use, and learn, a far wider vocabulary than you need in everyday life.

    In fact, as we language teachers know, most people don’t use more than 500 words actively, ie. in speech, independently of how many they understand

  6. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Hello Derek

    Good to have you back. BLADDERED is in my active vocabulary, sadly. Round here it’s a pretty common slang word for ‘drunk’ – along with MULLERED, RAT-ARSED and about a million others, of course. In my native north-east, STOTTED or STOTTING were the adjectives of choice when I was young, but I haven’t heard them for a bit.

    Keep well.

  7. Robi says:

    I thought bladdered was a fairly common expression; at least to dipsos. See: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Bladdered?r=66
    Slang Dictionary

    bladdered definition

    1.mod.
    drunk, especially with a full bladder. : I’m really bladdered! Somebody drive me home?

  8. Derek Lazenby says:

    As one who was once the sort of dissolute student who was more dissolute than student and consequently got ratted with examples of all social origins, I can safely say, never heard of it!

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