Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Inquisitor 1153 – Cross Purposes by Nutmeg (Saturday 20 November)

Posted by duncanshiell on December 1st, 2010

duncanshiell.

The preamble told us that clashes in the grid must be resolved (producing some non-words in the process) to display the name of a man of note for whom 2010 is an anniversary, thereby restoring three thematic works which must be highlighted. We were also told that appropriate assistance (if needed) may be found in the grid.

When I found my first clash on the upper left to bottom right diagonal, I though that perhaps all clashes were on that diagonal as that would help identify which intersecting clues had potential clashes and which didn’t.  Fortunately this proved to be the case.

The clashes down the diagonal (across first) produced

I/G S/U S/A A/T C/A V/A L/M B/A E/H L/N I/E Z/R

Aha, I thought, GUSTAV MAHLER, a musician, a man of note even, born 1860, therefore 2010 is the 150th anniversary of his birth.  This must be right.  However, I couldn’t find anything resembling Mahler’s works in the remainder of the grid.

Remembering a Listener puzzle of a couple of years ago when the clashes spelt out either Margaret Thatcher or Christopher Fry, I thought that I should perhaps look at the other half of the clashes and found ISAAC ALBENIZ, not a name I recognised.  However, a bit of research revealed that he too was a musician, born in 1860. Further work showed that three of his most famous works were ASTURIAS (a guitar piece, but only named such after his death), IBERIA (a piano suite) and TANGO in D (most frequently played on the guitar).  All of these words are only present in the grid if ISAAC ALBENIZ appears on the diagonal.  ASTURIAS is the full answer/entry to 10 across, TANGO is the full answer/entry to 14 across and IBERIA is part of the answer/entry for 29 across

In the comments on last week’s Inquisitor there was a suggestion that it would be very impressive if both diagonals could convey messages.  Remember the bit in the preamble that said approriate assistance may be found in the grid?  In this puzzle, the diagonal from bottom left to upper right displayed the message CHOOSE ISAAC A.  I have to admit that I didn’t notice this message until after I had chosen ISAAC A, but perhaps I should have looked sooner for the assistance.

As usual I discovered some new words, or re-discovered some words that I hadn’t seen for years, and only then in crosswords – ASGARD, ROSE-CUT, ALAPS, CENSE, TENDENZ, NUEVO SOL, CAIMAC, MILICE, and RENNE

You will see from the tables below that I struggled with the parsing of a couple of answers, ASGARD and TANGO, but I have given some ideas.

The clues were a good mix of types (e.g. anagrams, charades, dropped letters, compounds, container and contents, changing letters, part reversals , homonyms  and others) and also displayed different uses for common abbreviations in two pairs of consectutive clues.  CE was used as ‘church’ in 37 across and Chancellor of the Exchequer in 38 across.  U was used as ”universal’ in 2 down and ‘socially acceptable’ in 3 down.

The title ‘CROSS PURPOSES‘ probably referred to at least a couple of things – e.g. the diagonals and the fact that the clashes could be resolved in different ways.

Overall, a very enjoyable puzzle that I solved in a couple of hours.

I N S T Y L E P A T N A
A S T U R I A S L O C I
N E A T S N A S G A R D
T V T A N G O T A S T I
R O S E C U T S E T I N
Y S P D A A I A T I N G
C O L O N E L S B E D M
A L A P S S I B E R I A
I N T O S E L P E E A G
M O O L I S I F I N M Y
A H O Y D E C E N N I A
C E N S E T E N D E N Z
Across
No. Wordplay Answer Clash Entry
1 STY (inflamed swelling at the edge of the eyelid; eye sore) contained in (in the middle of) anagram of (transformed) NILE IN STYLE (with flair) G/IANTRY (1d) IN STYLE
6 PA (Maori settlement) + ANT (worker) reversed (turning) PATNA (Indian city)   PATNA
10 Anagram of (destroyed) AUSTRIAN excluding last letter (almost) N + S (southern) ASTURIAS NU/SEVO SOL (2d) ASTURIAS
11 LO (look)+ C (cold) + I (one) LOCI (passages [in books])   LOCI
12 NEWTS (reference ‘pissed as a newt’) with (W [West] replaced by S [South)] - change of direction) NESTS (settles) STA/STS (3d) NEATS
13 Sound like (we hear) AS GUARD (the clue says ‘how Alice’s fiancé was employed ‘.  The only vague references I can find to Alice and a fiancé who is employed as a guard are in a couple of topics in Google, one referring to the Twilight series of novels by Stephenie Meyer, and one referring to a new film adaptation of Alice in Wonderland) ASGARD (the heaven of Norse mythology, home of heroes slain in battle)   ASGARD
14 First letter of (primarily) TRAFFIC, T.  TANGO is the police code word for the letter T TANGO (‘measure’ can mean ‘a dance, especially a slow and stately one’.  I thought a tango was a fast dance, but I freely admit that my dancing skills are on a par with John Sergeant and Anne Widdecombe).’ TUTT/AED (4d) TANGO
16 Hidden word in (container) LONG-LASTING ASTI (Italian white wine)   ASTI
17 SEC (dry) contained in (seized by) ROUT (rabble) ROSE-CUT (a nearly hemispherical cut of a gemstone with a flat base and many small facets rising to a low point above) NA/CAN (15d) ROSECUT
18 SETTIN (goin’ down) excluding one of the middle letters T (half heartedly) SET IN (began)   SET IN
21 A (advanced) + VIA (through) + TING (small sound) AVIATING (using pilot’s skill) LINGUA/V (5d) AAIATING
23 COLS (passes) containing (round) (ONE [drink; a quick one] + L [left]) COLONELS (officers) M/LICICE (24d) COLONELS
27 PAL (comrade) reversed (comes back) contained in (inside) AS ALAPS (the introductory section of a raga [a traditional Hindi melody; Indian music])   ALAPS
29 (I [one] + BERI-BERI [a tropical disease] excluding one of the BERIs [half-eradicated]) all contained in (in) SA (South America) SIBERIA (a large part of [most of] Russia) ASA/BP (22d) SIBERIA
31 PINTO (a piebald horse) excluding the first letter (doesn’t start) P INTO (keen on)   INTO
33 L (length) contained in (covered by) EPEE (‘spit’ can mean a sword) ELPEE (LP, long playing record) BEH/EIND (25d) ELPEE
34 OLID (rank-smelling) excluding the final letter (trimmed) D contained in MOS (moments; seconds) MOOLIS (long white carrot shaped vegetables)   MOOLIS
35 Sounds like (sound of) FILL ME (possible request from a hungry child) FILMY (indistinct) REN/LNE (30d) FINMY
36 AY (always) containing (covering) HO (house) AHOY (hail [another vessel])   AHOY
37 Anagram of (broadcast) DEAN IN containing (about) CE (Church of England) DECENNIA (plural of decennium, a period of 10 years, decennia therefore refers to 20 years or more) INDIA ME/IN (19d) DECENNIA
38 ENS (philosophical word meaning ‘being) contained in (collected by) CE (Chancellor of the Exchequer) CENSE (obsolete word [at one time] meaning ‘tax’)   CENSE
39 T (the) + (anagram of [version of] ZEN containing [involving] DEN [study]) TENDENZ (A German variant for tendency; trend) MAGYAR/Z (26d) TENDENZ

 

Down
No. Wordplay Answer Clash Entry
1 NAG (harass) reversed (erected) + TRY(effort) GANTRY (platform or bridge for a travelling crane) I/GN STYLE (1a) IANTRY
2 Anagram of (lost) NO LOVE’S containing (adopting) U (universal, in film categorisation) NUEVO SOL (currency in Peru) AS/UTURIAS (10a) NSEVO SOL
3 STATUS (condition) excluding (not) U (socially acceptable) STATS (statistics; information, low-down) NES/ATS (12a) STATS
4 TT (teetotal, abstainer) contained in (in) an anagram of (playing) DUET TUTTED TA/TNGO (14a) TUTAED
5 Hidden word in (extract from) JOURNAL IN GUATEMALAN LINGUA (tongue) AV/AIATION (21a) LINGUA
6 First and last letters of (extremists) each of PIOUS and SECT PSST (used to attract attention)   PSST
7 Anagram of (at sea) A GALE ALGAE (seaweed, which may well be washed up by a gale at sea) &lit   ALGAE
8 TOAST (a call to drink to an admired person; a tribute) + IE (id est; that is) TOASTIE (snack)   TOASTIE
9 ABIDING (permanent, lasting; steadfast) excluding (refusing) the second letter (second) B AIDING (helping)   AIDING
15 CANAAN (promised land) excluding the first two letters (of six) CA (one third eaten) NAAN (bread) ROSEC/AUT (17a) NCAN
19 IN (popular) + DI (Detective Inspector; policeman) + AMEN (expression of assent; approval) INDIAMEN (large ships employed in trade with India many years ago; old-fashioned craft) DECENNI/EA (37a) INDIAMIN
20 Anagram of (reformed) METROPOLITAN excluding (no) MERIT PLATOON (squad)   PLATOON
22 A (one) + PAS (dance step) reversed (taken up) ASAP (as soon as possible; without delay) SIB/AERIA (29a) ASBP
23 (C [chapter] and C [chapter], chapters) containing (AIM [target] + A [area]) CAIMAC (Turkish lieutentant-colonel)   CAIMAC
24 MI (musical note in the sol-fa notation) + LICE (possible source of infestation) MILICE (the government militia in Vichy France) COLONEL/M (23a) LILICE
25 HINT (intimate) excluding the final letter (not quite) T contained in (in) BED BEHIND (failing to keep up) ELPE/HE (33a) BEEIND
26 MAGI (Three Wise Men; visiting trio) excluding the final letter (briefly) I + RAY (glance) reversed (up) MAGYAR (a member of the majority ethnic group of Hungray; Middle-European) TENDENZ/R (39a) MAGYAZ
28 LOP (cut) reversed (back) + first letters of (leaders of) each of YOUNG and STUDENTS POLYS (polytechnics – colleges where subjects were tmany arts or technical subjects were taught up to degree level – I don’t think any now exist in the United Kingdom as all were upgraded to University status after 1992)   POLYS
30 TENNER (ten pound note; money) excluding (taking … out) T (time) reversed (raised) RENNE (Spenserian [Edmund] form of ‘run’) FIL/NMY (35a) RENNE
32 SIDE (team) SIDE (arrogance) double definition   SIDE

11 Responses to “Inquisitor 1153 – Cross Purposes by Nutmeg (Saturday 20 November)”

  1. Kettledrum says:

    Thanks for explaining all the clues I didn’t understand.
    I think the answer to 13a lies in the poem by A A Milne.

    ‘They’re changing guards at Buckingham Palace;
    Christopher Robin went down with Alice.
    Alice is marrying one of the guard …..’

  2. HolyGhost says:

    Will comment on the puzzle later. Meanwhile ASGARD & TANGO …

    From Winnie the Pooh, I believe, is the poem/song that starts “They’re changing guard at Buckingham Palace – // Christopher Robin went down with Alice. // Alice is marrying one of the guard.”

    TANGO was the last answer I got – I think it is as Duncan says: measure = dance, and the code word for T (in international radio communication) is Tango.

  3. kenmac says:

    Was anyone else puzzled by the phrase “…for whom 2010 is an anniversary…”?

    Surely every year is an anniversary for everyone!!

    TANGO was the last one to fall for me too.

  4. Duncan Shiell says:

    Thanks Kenmac and Holy Ghost – A A Milne as a source seems a lot more sensible than my two rather tenuous suggestions.

  5. nmsindy says:

    kenmac, re comment #3, you’re literally correct of course but it think it would be read as a ‘special anniversary’, that’s how I saw it, as here of course, the 150th.

    If memory serves, Nutmeg did a Chopin puzzle for Inquisitor too, so a setter with a great interest in classical music for sure, I’d say.

  6. Ali says:

    I made ridiculously heavy weather of this and ultimately failed on some clues in the bottom half of the grid and my own inability to consider that the theme was anything other than Mahler. ‘of note’ in the preamble was a fairly clear signpost to a composer and I spotted GUSTAV in the diagonal clashes early on, so started poring over Mahler’s Wikipedia entry and was convinced that this all related to Bernstein’s ‘resurrection’ of his music in 1960. Oh dear!

    Score one for the setter then, but yet another great puzzle to continue the excellent run of IQs

  7. HolyGhost says:

    In my top 3 of the year so far, I think. I felt enjoyably manipulated. Solved the bottom left and top right quadrants fairly smoothly, and made headway with top left, enabling me to feel sure about GUSTAV and, with that, MAHLER helped me to fill in the bottom right. But I could find no thematic works, so with a completed grid I sat back to ponder.

    I’d seem CHOOSE going up the other diagonal earlier, but made no sense of ISAACA for quite a while, until I spotted those as the choices I’d discarded in favour of GUSTAV. Still the penny didn’t drop, and then I went back to the puzzle to see what if I also discarded MAHLER … and up popped (A)LBENIZ (also b.1860). And it was a short (googly) sprint to the three musical pieces.

    Mugged – but gently.

  8. scarpia says:

    Thanks Duncan.
    I was convinced the composer was going to be Samuel Barber and so made this a bit more difficult than was necessary.
    The only one I didn’t understand was ASGARD – thanks HolyGhost.
    Strangely,Albeniz’s music is usually heard transcribed for guitar,when most was originally written for piano.
    Perhaps this might show why it is tackled by very few pianists – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WWz1Abdwgk

    If anyone is interested in hearing more of the piano music of albeniz,I can highly recommend the first(E.M.I. cat. no. CMS7645042)recordings made by Alicia de Larrocha.

    Another great puzzle in the Inquisitor series.

  9. Mike Laws says:

    For some obscure reason, I spotted

    As has been amply demonstrated in her previous IQ’s, she is a (crossword/classical music) nut by the name of Margaret. I always find her submissions tricky but fair, soundly clued, and most important, entertaining. The two I have in stock are no exceptions!

  10. Mike Laws says:

    Sorry, hit the Tab key instead of the Caps Lock.

    For some obscure reason, I spotted ISAAC ALBENITZ before GUSTAV MAHLER, so the SW-NE diagonal was the last twig for the Eddie!

  11. Simon Harris says:

    Enjoyed this one a lot. Having studied classical guitar throughout my teenage years, ASTURIAS was a giveaway, thankfully. Thanks to Nutmeg and Duncan.

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