Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Financial Times 13,595 Set by Cinephile

Posted by PeeDee on January 19th, 2011

PeeDee.

A super crossword from Cinephile, though a couple of words had me reaching for the dictionary.  My favourites are 3dn and 7dn.  The body parts that are omitted from the subsidiary parts of the clues are shown in bold italic.  I have resisted the urge to pun on body parts myself, but please don’t let that stop you :) 

As an experiment I have added the clues into the blog, view them by hovering the mouse over the clue number.  Please let me know if this works for you.

Across
1 BULK PURCHASE (REBUS CHALK UP)*
8 OBOVATE OBOE around VAT (European purchase tax)
9 TANTRUM TANT (so much French)  RUM
11 RANKLED RD (short road) + ANKLE
12 HUSBAND Double definition
13 INERT dINER Today
14 NOSE WHEEL West  + NOSE + HEEL
16 HARD TIMES
(DIRT SHAME)*
19 LEGIT IT  + LEG
21 MACHINE MAE (West) + CHIN
23 INTERIM INTER ‘IM
24 NEEDIER NE’ER around DIE
25 EPIGEAL E PIG ‘EAL  ‘living in or close to the earth’
26 AT FIRST SIGHT (THIRST’S A GIFT)*
Down
1 BROWNIE North IE + BROW.
2 LEAFLET Leaflet is ‘part of a leaf’, and a flyer is a loose sheet paper advertisement.
3 PSEUDONYM PONY (£25 slang) M (thousand) around DUES raised.
4 RETCH RH grasping ETC
5 HANDSAW SAW (spotted) + HAND “I know a hawk from a handsaw” quote from Hamlet
6 SURFACE treaSURy + FACE
7 TO ERR IS HUMAN (MARSH RUIN)* + TOE  a divine clue
10 MIDDLE TEMPLE MILE outside DD + TEMPLE.  One of the Inns of Court in London.
15 SASSINESS S ASSESS holding IN
17 RICHEST RI + CHEST
18 TBILISI (IT IS)* about LIB reversed
19 LETTING Definition and cryptic definition
20 GARMENT GENT + ARM
22 EARLS LS (L = pound) + EAR

*Anagram. 
Body parts omitted from the solutions are shown in bold italic.

12 Responses to “Financial Times 13,595 Set by Cinephile”

  1. Uncle Yap says:

    Thank you PeeDee and the good Reverend for a superb blog and puzzle respectively. I really enjoy the puzzle even though it took me longer than usual.

    Pseudonym was my favourite and for 14A, do you know that Dac over at Indy had
    Millions read this novel (4,5) which I would rate an &lit

  2. PeeDee says:

    Uncle Yap – you mean 16ac rather than 14ac. Hard to choose between these two clues, both very good but I think Dac just pips Cinephile to the post.

  3. Lenny says:

    This was a delightful puzzle and much more difficult than those the Reverend usually sets in Cinephile mode. I had great difficulty with the minimalist clues, such as those to Legit and Earls. I finished with Pseudonym which, on reflection, should have been obvious. Like Uncle Yap, I was intrigued by the Dickens novel making its second appearance of the day.
    Thanks PeeDee, your hovering clues set a new standard in blogging.

  4. Bracoman says:

    Thanks for the innovative and helpful blog. I think is is a welcome addition to have the clue as well as the solution. Like the others I enjoyed this one.

  5. smiffy says:

    Probably my favourite FT puzzle of the year to date. Was relieved to complete it without aids, albeit not without a little guesswork. Learned a new Shakespearian souindbite thanks to 5D, and thankfully the ‘Georgian city’ was not more obscure than the capital.

    I also proffer a thumbs-up to the innovative, “hidden clue” feature of the blog. I’d be happy to try to replicate in tomorrow’s blog, provided that it’s not too finickety, or requires a PhD in HTML. Do you have a How To Guide, for Dummies like me?

  6. Uncle Yap says:

    Just before I go to sleep (nearly 1 am now) I discovered the “by hovering the mouse over the clue number” NEAT
    How do you do this? Can you please email me and other bloggers so we can copy

  7. bamberger says:

    When I first read the rubric I couldn’t understand it. After 30 minutes I had solved only 4d so gave up and bought the Telegraph. It would have helped this novice if an example had been given of what he meant. Obviously one for the experienced.

  8. Alan says:

    Thank you PeeDee for the excellent blog and I’m happy to say the hovering mouse trick revealed the clues splendidly. I was held up with solving this as (I’m ashamed to admit) I hadn’t read the instructions. I was sure 17d had to be richest and 10d Middle Temple, but was puzzled as to what explained the body parts. Then I saw what I had missed (too eager to attempt the crossword is my excuse). Once the penny dropped, it was much easier going, and most enjoyable.

  9. Tony Welsh says:

    Like Alan, I got 17d without having read the instruction, and was puzzled. Also 17d, and I knew something was up so then I read the instruction! Which made it all a lot easier but I still thought it odd that there was no indication of what to do with the unmentioned body part. e.g. how did one know to put “ankle” in the middle of “rd” in 11a. But a good puzzle none the less.

    “Epigeal” unknown to me, as was the Hamlet quote.

  10. Tony Welsh says:

    Oops, I meant that I got 10d and 17d without the instruction, just like Alan.

  11. Scarpia says:

    Thanks PeeDee.
    Agree with smiffy,best FT puzzle to date.
    Unusual for the FT to give no indication of which clues were thematic,which added to the difficulty.I thought the definitions in the thematic clues were very fair.
    Agree with bamberger @7 an example would have been helpful to solvers who are unfamiliar with this type of clueing.
    Favourite clue was 14 across,last in were 19 across and 19 down,which I somehow managed to make more difficult than they turned out to be.
    Hard Times must be the most clued of all Dickens’ novels – don’t often see Martin Chuzzlewit in crosswords!

    I do like your innovation to show the clues – very clever!

  12. Sil van den Hoek says:

    We saved this crossword for today, which turned out to be a good idea since I do not want to solve Rovers anymore [and how right I am ...].

    I can only agree with all the above posts that this was a magnificent Cinephile – in fact, this was a crossword that would hugely have been appreciated, if it were a Saturday Araucaria. And no dubious liberties this time, too.

    Only a few (don’t worry, minor) quibbles.
    We didn’t like to see MAE (as part of 21ac) defined by “the West” (one cannot ignore the “the” here, I think).
    And we thought that there is not really an anagrind in 26ac. One might say “given” but that one belongs to “t(ime)”. And “for” is our opinion a bit meagre.
    BTW, PeeDee, you forgot this “t(ime)” in your – excellent – blog.

    Great fun!

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