Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent on Sunday 1,096 by Quixote

Posted by Simon Harris on February 20th, 2011

Simon Harris.

I don’t know about you chaps, but I found this week’s Quixote a bit of a challenge. That was possibly due to there being several unfamiliar terms involved (11ac, 16ac and the conductor at 22ac, for example). Still, the more obscure ones were deducible from wordplay, as is customary for Quixote.

*=anag, []=dropped, <=reversed, hom=homophone, cd=cryptic definition, dd=double definition.

Across
1 DISABLED – A SID< + BLED.
6 PROD – PRO + [ro]D.
11 CITHARA – IT in CHAR A.
12 TEST BAN – ([threa]T + ABSENT)*.
13 EUROPEANISATION – (AUTO PIONEERS IN A)*.
14 DELTONA – ON in DELTONA. Apparently a city in Florida. New to me, but definitely solvable from subsidiary indications.
16 EXARCH – EX + A RC + H.
18 BANYAN – ANY in BAN[k].
19 TWISTER – (Oliver) TWIST + ER.
22 ARTURO TOSCANINI – (IN ACTION OUR STAR)*.
25 OFFICER – OFF + ICE + R.
26 EASTERN – E[mpire] + ASTERN.
27 ALSO – [fanatic]AL SO[metimes]. The definition (“too”) was well hidden here, I thought.
28 LARGESSE – (LESS RAGE)*.
Down
2 INTER ALIA – (IN RETAIL)* + A.
3 ALAS POOR YORICK – (CALYPSO OK I ROAR)*.
4 LLAMA – (A M + ALL)<.
5 DETRIMENT – ED< + (I M in TRENT).
7 RABBI – RABBI[t].
8 DININGD + IN + IN + G.
9 SCREED – S[tudy] + CREED.
10 AS FAR AS I CAN SEE – (A SAFARI’S)* + (A SCENE)*.
15 AU NATUREL – RULE* in AUNT.
17 CATTINESS – (SAINTS ETC)*.
20 REIGNS – hom. of “rains”.
21 PAGODA – PA + (A DOG)<.
23 TIFFS – from STIFF, with the S moved from the beginning to the end.
24 SMEAR – ME in SAR[i].

7 Responses to “Independent on Sunday 1,096 by Quixote”

  1. scchua says:

    Thanks Simon, for the blog, and Quixote for another enjoyable puzzle.

    The obscure-to-me clues which were obtained from the wordplay and then confirmed in the dicts were CITHARA and EXARCH, but, being of a different generation, perhaps, I easily discerned ARTURO TOSCANINI.

    Re 5D DETRIMENT – I have an alternate reading: ED< + I M in ("river") TRENT.

    Favourites were 1A DISABLED, a nostalgic reference to SID James, one of the pioneers of the Carry On series, 15D AU NATUREL and 23D TIFFS.

    Btw I think you meant 17D CATTINESS and not CAITHNESS.

  2. Simon Harris says:

    Whoops – thanks, scchua. I’ve corrected 17d and modified 5d to reflect your more plausible parsing.

  3. Tokyo Colin says:

    Thanks Simon. Interesting how perceptions of difficulty vary. I gave up on yesterday’s Scorpion with all its obscure (to me) references while others, including scchua, found it easier than the weekday puzzles. Whereas I found this one very easy. The only word I didn’t know (11ac) was obvious from the wordplay. Favourite clue would be 1ac, bringing back memories of Sid James (he was famous in Australia too, 40+ years ago.) But most pleasure was from 21dn. From the word play I started with PA-TEP-A and discarded it, then PA-TAC-A and wondered about the meaning of the Macau currency unit for a moment, then pondered PA-GOD-A and almost moved on before it hit me.

  4. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thank you, Simon.

    I very rarely buy the IoS, but did last week and was pleased to tackle this puzzle after reading the paper. I found the same obscure(ish) words as others, but was able to get them from the clear clueing and some crossing letters. I liked EASTERN, a regular solution clued in a clever way; and AU NATUREL raised a smile.

  5. jmac says:

    This presented a stiffer challenge than I anticipated (more so than the Scorpion Saturday prize puzzle), but was good fun and, as is the case with the top setters, the less familiar solutions (DELTONA and EXARCH) were easily deduced from the impeccable cluing.

  6. rodders says:

    Funny how we all differ – I invariably find Quixote very easy, as I do Phi.

    BUT…………yesterdays prize puzzle I am really having problems with – after an hour I am at about 50 % !!!

  7. Scarpia says:

    Thanks Simon.
    Quality puzzle,as usual,from Quixote.Nothing unfamiliar for me,Toscanini was one of the most famous conductors in his day and many of his recordings are still available.He was the Maestro in charge of World premieres of many famous works including Puccini’s La Boheme and Barber’s Adagio for Strings.
    Favourite clue for me,17 down.

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