Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Azed 2021 plain

Posted by bridgesong on February 27th, 2011

bridgesong.

I found this very hard, partly because I had never heard of either of the two 13 letter anagrams at 15 and 29 across.  There were several other obscure words and I will need readers’ help to explain 31 across.  There are also a couple of other clues where I have raised a doubt.   As it happens I shall be away when this blog appears without internet access so will only be able to respond on Sunday evening.  I regret that I was unable to use PeeDee’s wonderful bit of software to write this blog, so here’s a link to the pdf of the puzzle.

Across
1 BARSAC BARS, A/C. A sweet white wine from Bordeaux
7 HAGGED EGG (rev) in HAD. An egg is a type of bomb or mine, and “rings” in the clue is a verb
12 WAWL W(omen), *LAW
13 BOFF BOFF(in). It’s an American slang term which can mean an entertainment
14 LEPIDOSTROBUS *(I SPOT BOULDERS)
15 DIPLONT *(PONDLI)fe, ‘T. An organism in which only the zygote is diploid, according to Chambers
16 HALE A(s) L(ady) in HE. Haul is a variant form of this word
18 DIPTERAN *s(PIDER, ANT). It took me a long time to realise that the anagram indicator (“dismembered”) applied to both words, but I think on reflection that the clue is perfectly fair
19 RANGE (kitche)N in RAGE
20 GANTT Hidden in “elegant togs”. Henry L Gantt must have been one of the earliest management consultants
22 LINGSTER STER LING, the two parts being repositioned
26 OLEA O, LEA. The ash tree is one of this genus
27 NAMIBIA AMI in NB, I A
29 CLIOMETRICIAN *(I’M ONE CRITICAL)
30 FARL RAF (rev), L
31 NOLL A Spenserian word for the top of the head (Shakespeare spells it NOLE). I can’t explain the reference to Lear
32 STEERY STEE(d), RY. A word coined (and used only by) Sir Walter Scott
33 SILENE SILEN(c)E
Down
1 BALDERLOCKS BALDER, LOCKS. I’m not entirely sure about the soundness of this clue. “Hair thinner” obviously equates to BALDER, but I’m not persuaded that “on top” can be taken to mean LOCKS. The word itself refers to a type of seaweed
2 RAPPEN RAP, PEN. A very small Swiss monetary unit
3 SWILL S(hakespeare), WILL. A very Azedian clue, referring of course to Jonson, Ben
4 ALDOSE L in A DOSE
5 CION (pa)*CINO. The Al Pacino reference helps to make the point that this is a US spelling
6 ABSTINENTLY *(A BENTLEY ISN’T) less E
7 HOTSPUR *(SO PUT) in HR
8 AFRIT R in A FIT. It means a demon, and of course is the pen name of Prebendary A F Ritchie, an early setter of very difficult crosswords for The Listener
9 GOBAR GO, BAR
10 EMULATE EMUL(gent), ATE
11 DISENTRANCE *(NAN REST) in DICE
17 MAILLOT A ILL in MOT
18 DITHERY IT, HE in DRY
20 GEMINI EM, I in GIN, I
21 NUBILE *(IN BLUE). The primary meaning of the word is “marriageable”
23 NEIVE Hidden in “ermine, I venture”. The problem is that “dukes” is plural(meaning fists) and NEIVE is singular (a fist)
24 SIMAR a(RAMIS) (rev)
25 NICOL LOCI, N (all rev)
28 ARMS Two definitions

8 Responses to “Azed 2021 plain”

  1. grandpuzzler says:

    Thanks for your blog, bridgesong. In 1dn I thought that LOCKS simply meant hair. I was unsure about 31ac. I opted for NOLE because Lear was Shakespearean. Doubtless, someone will have a better explanation.

    Cheers…

  2. George Heard says:

    I had 31 as NOLE because with NO L,E LEAR would be A,R

  3. Andrew Kitching says:

    Well done George. I realise that with NOLL there’ll be no chance of book tokens this week.

  4. Jan says:

    Thank you for the blog, bridgesong. I came to the same conclusion as George, re NOLE, with a nod to Shakespeare, but I’m not at all sure where the R comes from in AFRIT. Am I missing something obvious?

    I was happy with … ‘He’s thinner on top, he has balder locks.’

    This being only my third Azed puzzle I have some thoughts but will make another post to avoid boring everyone.

  5. Jan says:

    I hadn’t done a barred puzzle since Richard Whiteleggs’ last offering as Mephisto in the ST, more than 15 years ago. At Derby I met some Azed fans and decided to have a go.

    I mention the time gap because two things struck me as I solved the puzzles. With so many crossing letters and uncommon words how tempting and easy it is to use Chambers Word Wizard on the Net and my 25 year old copy of Chambers Dictionary is no longer good enough – four of the solutions to this puzzle are not in it and other definitions did not include given key words.

    Word Wizard readily supplied BALDERLOCKS but the linked dictionary couldn’t find it, nor could my book. The word ‘tangle’ suggested that it was a seaweed.

    I could guess SIMAR from the clue but my Chambers referred me to CYMAR (dress) or CHIMER (tabard) neither of which mention ‘coat’.

    MAILLOT is defined as ballet tights or a swimsuit – no sign of a ‘jersey’.

    I couldn’t find BOFF, LINGSTER or RAPPEN in my dictionary. I presume all these words are in the 2008 edition?

  6. sidey says:

    There is a little known version of Chambers available on their site called WordWeb. The free version is not the latest version but it’s quite useful http://wordweb.info/free/

    NOLE is an odd one for Azed, he’s a bit of a swine with four letter clues.

  7. bridgesong says:

    Thanks, all, for your comments.

    I’m kicking myself over NOLL; obviously NOLE is correct for the reason which George gives @2. I also accept Jan’s explanation for BALDERLOCKS @4. The R in AFRIT comes from “take”, as r is an abbreviation for recipe, the Latin for “take”; it used to be common for doctors to include it on prescriptions. MAILLOT is now also defined as a jersey in the 2008 edition, but I knew it from the French “maillot jaune” or yellow jersey worn by the leader in the Tour de France. BOFF, LINGSTER (under lingua) and RAPPEN are indeed all in the 2008 edition. You really don’t have much chance of completing an Azed without it.

  8. Jan says:

    Thanks for that link, sidey. I will have a longer look at it.

    Hi bridgesong: thanks for the explanation of the R. It rings a little bell now.

    “You really don’t have much chance of completing an Azed without it.”

    I can complete them but have to resort to other sources to verify definitions. I have the 2008 edition on my Wish List.

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