Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Financial Times 13,636 / Jason

Posted by Agentzero on March 8th, 2011

Agentzero.

Some pleasingly tricky clues here, in particular 7 down and 16 down.  I didn’t otherwise find much to comment on, except I wonder how our nonnative English speakers fared with the somewhat obscure slang in 8 down and 23 down.

Across
1 MAIN COURSE dd
6 ISIS I[sland] SIS[ter] (little female relative)
9 MICHAELMAS The names MICHAEL and SAM  are “back-to-back”
10 LIDO LID (cap) O (ring)
12 WRITERS BLOCK *(BRISTOL WRECK)
15 CAMPANULA CAMP (effeminate) + A + ALUN (lad) reversed
17 TASTE S[on] in TATE (London art gallery)
18 ANGUS hidden in slANG USed
19 PRESCRIBE PRES[ent] CRIB (cot) E (close to “babe”)
20 PENCIL PUSHER PENCIL (wherein to find lead; why “lusty”?) P (quietly) USHER (guide)
24 PUBS B[ass] in SUP (drink), reversed
25 FLEA MARKET FL[og] (a couple beginning “flog”) + *(TEA MAKER)
26 REED RE (on the matter of) ED (education)
27 GRIM REAPER d&cd
 
Down
1 MEMO reverse hidden in welcOME Mat
2 INCH A triple definition; an INCH is an island, and is also signified by IN CH (Switzerland).  I think I would have preferred the misdirection of “Creep in Switzerland,” evoking a different sense of “creep”
3 CHAIRMANSHIP MAN (bloke) in *(IRISH CHAP)
4 UNLIT L[earner] in UNIT (one)
5 STAIRCASE I (one) in STAR (celeb) + CASE (bit of baggage)
7 SAILOR SUIT SAILOR (salt) SUIT (please)
8 SHOPKEEPER SHOP (grass) KEEPER (minder).  “Shop” and “grass” are both slang words for “inform on someone to the police”
11 OBSTACLE RACE *(CLOSE CABARET)
13 SCRAP PAPER APP (iPhone gizmo) in SCRAPER (stripper)
14 IMAGINABLE IM (I am) + *(A BELGIAN)
16 UNPOPULAR U[niform] in UN (a, French) POPLAR (tree); the definition is simply “not in”
21 SWARM S[pecial] WARM (kind)
22 SKIP dd
23 STIR dd; both “stir” and “bird” are slang for “prison”

7 Responses to “Financial Times 13,636 / Jason”

  1. Rishi says:

    Agent0: Re the slang terms in 8 and 23d: I don’t think any of these would have posed a problem to solvers in India. Non-native speakers of English pick up these when reading crime novels or tackling UK/US crosswords regularly.

  2. Bryan says:

    Many thanks Agentzero I found this very enjoyable.

    Well done, Jason. More of the same please!

  3. smiffy says:

    I thought this was a ripsnorter of a puzzle. Plenty of neat twists, and deft exploitation of ambiguous phrase (e.g. ‘Bass’, ‘one such’, ‘not in uniform’). And, of course, bonus style points for resurrecting Olly Reed; I imagine that he’d appreciate being pegged alongside Mr Reaper in the bottom row!

    20A’s lustiness is a reference to the priapic phrase “here’s lead in your pencil”.
    24A, 1D and 13D (although, I quail at attributing phone apps uniquely to Apple!) also raised a smile.

  4. walruss says:

    Indeed a very good runout from Jason, Smiffy, and you pick the tricks I myself enjoyed. How nice ‘on the matter of education’ is!!

  5. bamberger says:

    Don’t recall doing a Jason before. Solved most without aids but needed it for Campanula and couldn’t get swarm.

    Thanks for the blog

  6. kobeltboy says:

    Excellent stuff. Just the thing to avoid having to go home on a Tuesday evening. Another grey hair for campanula.

  7. Scarpia says:

    Thanks Agentzero.
    Nice puzzle from Jason,not too difficult but plenty of amusing clues.Some good anagrams and the cheeky 20 across,which I read the same way as smiffy.
    27 across didn’t quite work for me but was easily gettable.
    Second use of APP in as many days.

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