Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 7627 / Phi

Posted by Gaufrid on March 28th, 2011

Gaufrid.

It was something of a surprise to see Phi on a Monday, Eimi must have something interesting lined up for April 1st.

A relatively easy, but pleasant, start to the week with, so far as I can see, no Nina or theme. There were couple of new words/terms for me (4ac & 1dn) but these were gettable from the wordplay, with confirmation by Collins and Wikipedia.

My only slight concern was with 22dn where ‘riot’ is very similar to ‘rout’ and so the clue became very easy. Perhaps Phi could have chosen different synonym.

Across
1 TABOO TA (cheers) BOO (expression of disapproval)
4 CLOISONNÉ I (one) SON (youngster) in CLONE (copy) – a design made by filling in with coloured enamel an outline of flattened wire put on edge (Collins)
9 RED CARPET REDCAR (seaside resort) PET (favoured)
10 YOUNG *(NO GUY)
11 SATELLITE DISH *(THIS ‘AD TELLIES) &lit
14 UNIX U (university) NIX (nothing)
15 GOGGLE-EYED GOG (giant) GLEE (expression of pleasure) YE (you once) D (had)
18 BEFRIENDED *(BRIEF) ENDED (stopped)
19 OTTO OTT (excessive) O (love)
21 ASSET-STRIPPER A S (second) SETS (groups) TRIPPER (tourist)
24 ASHEN ASH (tree) EN[d] (demise curtailed)
25 DOUBLE-DIP DOUB[t] (a lot of uncertainty) LED (guided) I (one) P[olitician]
27 SURCHARGE CHAR (daily) in SURGE (sudden increase)
28 RUGBY [operatin]G in RUBY (red)
 
Down
1 TARAS BULBA A in TARS (sailors) BULB (source of light) A – the eponymous hero of a book by Nikolai Gogol.
2 BAD BA[n]D (pop group missing note)
3 ORACLE [c]ORACLE (about to be thrown from boat)
4 CAPRICORN CAP (hat) [t]RICORN (old-fashioned hat, though lacking first)
5/7 ON THE NAUGHTY STEP *(THAT YOUNG STEPHEN)
6 SKYDIVER DIV[E] (most of resort) in SKYE (Scottish island) R (right) – dive: “a resort, generally disreputable, often underground, eg a bar (slang)” (Chambers)
8 EDGY D (Germany) in EG (say) Y (Yen)
12 TAIL FEATHER TAIL (dog) FEAT (exploit) HER (the female’s)
13 IDEOGRAPHY *(A PRODIGY EH)
16 GREAT OUSE EAT (take in) in GROUSE (complaint)
17 LIP-SYNCH P (piano) in I’S (one’s) in LYNCH (knock off)
20 PILLAR ILL (unfortunate) in PAR (standard)
22 TUDOR D (daughter) in ROUT (riot) reversed
23 BASS BAS[i]S (rationale one ignored)
26 DOG DO (party) G (Government)
 

14 Responses to “Independent 7627 / Phi”

  1. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thank you, Gaufrid.

    Phi bookending the weekend for us. It must be April Fool’s Day on Friday or something.

    Unusually, I wasn’t keen on Phi’s puzzle last Friday, but this was top drawer. I thought SATELLITE DISH and ON THE NAUGHTY STEP were very cleverly constructed, and I liked SURCHARGE as well. I was pleased to get CLOISONNÉ (which I had vaguely heard of) and TARAS BULBA (which I definitely hadn’t) from the wordplay alone, which is always a pleasing part of the solving process.

    Great start to the week.

  2. Eileen says:

    Thank you, Gaufrid.

    The new expression for me was LIP-SYNCH – I call it miming!

    As Kathryn’s Dad says, TARAS BULBA was easily gettable from the wordplay and I’d heard of [but not seen] the Yul Brynner film.

    I really liked SATELLITE DISH and ON THE NAUGHTY STEP [lovely picture!] too.

  3. walruss says:

    What does ON THE NAUGHTY STEP mean?

  4. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Hi walruss.

    ON THE NAUGHTY STEP is where children are made to stand when they’ve been misbehaving. I’m more familiar with being sent to stand in THE NAUGHTY CORNER (linguistically rather than literally, clearly). I’ve always known the phrase, and assumed that it comes from a punishment in a primary school environment. Though not nowadays, obviously; you’d have human rights lawyers all over you like a rash.

  5. Rishi says:

    Ah, I saw the Yul Brynner film ‘Taras Bulba’ at a cinema here in Chennai. In those decades there was a time-lag of a couple of years before the reels made their way to India.

  6. scchua says:

    Thanks Gaufrid, and Phi.

    All straightforward and cleanly clued. Favourites were 4A CLOISONNE, 21A ASSET STRIPPER, and the &lit 5 7 ON THE NAUGHTY STEP.

  7. walruss says:

    I’ve certainly been IN THE CORNER and ON THE MAT. But that’s it!

  8. spb says:

    The naughty step is, in fact, the bottom step in a staircase where naughty children are sent to sit (rather than stand) by way of punishment. It is the current and socially acceptable alternative to smacking. Expect a massive surge in deliquents from bungalows in a few years time. Goggle-eyed was my favourite.

  9. malc95 says:

    Call me pedantic if you like, but I’m not happy with 17d –
    “lip-synch” occurs when audio and video signals are in synchronisation, which they frequently are not. Nothing to do with miming, although I see where the confusion may arise.

  10. Gaufrid says:

    Hi malc95
    I’m sorry but Phi’s definition is correct, lip-synch is miming according to the three usual references:

    Chambers: “the synchronization of lip movements with already recorded sound, esp by singers making television appearances”

    Collins: “to mouth (prerecorded words) on television or film”

    COED: “(of a singer) move the lips silently in synchronization with a pre-recorded soundtrack”

  11. flashling says:

    Phi on a monday!? Good grief, the end of the world? No that was Tees last week! Nice little crossword except 1d – not heard of the book. As friday’s due blogger I now wonder what Eimi has planned for me/us.
    Thanks Gaufrid for explaining 1d and Phi for the fun.

  12. Ian says:

    Thanks Gaufrid.

    An excellent Phi with much to admire, esp SATELLITE DISH and CLOISONNÉ. A very nice contrast to the less exacting Rufus in The Guardian as was a rather spiky Obtrox cryptic ( i.44) in the Indy’s companion newspaper which took some solving, having to cope with NACELLE, SHAKO and UNLOOSE not to mention some clever, devious cluing.

  13. Allan_C says:

    Just in case anyone’s still reading this after 3 days (I’m still catching up with the papers after a long weekend away) Taras Bulba is also the title of a symphonic poem – inspired by the book – by Leoš Janá?ek. I guess that may be what Phi was thinking of originally before cluing 1dn with reference to the book.

  14. Allan_C says:

    For Janá?ek read Janácek – the system obviously doesn’t like the diacritic on the ‘c’

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