Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Inquisitor 1173: Not Fare by Lato

Posted by duncanshiell on April 27th, 2011

duncanshiell.

This puzzle had a preamble that I had to read a few times before I really understood it, and even then the whole thing didn’t make complete sense until I had completed the final step of the puzzle.

The preamble was ‘Lato writes:  "Corrected single letter misprints in definitions to twelve thematic answers explain what I’ve done (well someone had to).  For good measure, and ignoring any sporting or literary distinction, I’ve done the same to two other answers clued only by wordplay.  I was especially upset by a normally clued answer, or so I thought till I realised I should have moved on (sorry, 4); solvers able to do this must write the correct version (two words) below the grid." (This last is a requirement -Ed.)’

I started off with the normal clues and hoped that I would be able to deduce some Thematic answers from crossing letters and hence start identifying some misprints in the Thematic clues.  That strategy seemed to work eventually, after a rather slow start.

From the table of thematic clues and answers below, we can see that the corrected misprints spell out the phrase BASH THE BANKS.  We weren’t however bashing the Sub-Prime lenders or the Investment BANKS or the High Street BANKS; instead we were bashing or anagramming words that referred to other types of banks (geographical features or stores).  In addition, there were the two literary and sporting BANKSIAIN and GORDON that were clued through wordplay and anagrammed as INIA (38 across) and DRONGO (15 down).

Once the grid was filled, I spent some time pondering the final step.  I went off down a blind alley for a time when I spotted that 18 across, HALTING, was an anagram of ALTHING, the Icelandic Parliament.  Given the problems for depositors with at least two Icelandic Banks and the continuing debates n the Icelandic Parliament and the referendum amongst the Icelandic people about debt repayment, I wondered whether Lato had some personal issue with Iceland.  Eventually, I concentrated on the cryptic phrase in the preamble ‘I realised I should have moved on’ and I started to look at normal answers which included ON.  Only the answer to 32 across ON THE BUSES, had consecutive letters ON.  A little bit of playing about with moving ON wiothin the answer produced THE BONUSES which seemed to be a more likely answer than my Icelandic goose-chase was ever going to provide.  The phrase ‘Sorry 4′ in the preamble is a reference to the star of ON THE BUSES, REG Varney (1916 – 2008)

This puzzle was a challenge, but without doubt it was an enjoyable challenge as the whole thing came together.  I was able to parse almost all the clues as I solved them.  Only the final one, 37 down, AWN, resisted parsing until I came to the very end of the blog when the W for with and GER for a Mongolian tent floated into mind.  All the reversal indicators for Down clues referred to up, or lifting or similar concepts.  Many of the surfaces conjured up clear word pictures and, to me, all except 13 across had smooth and sensible surfaces.

The only part of the puzzle I have failed to crack is what the Title, Not Fare, means. The only anagrams I can find are Fortean and Fear Not neither of which seem to have an association with BANKS of any kind. Given that Fare could refer to a bus fare I wonder if the Title has some association with ON THE BUSES? Suggestions welcome.

R E A F F I R M R O S E T
E Y I G R A E A E V E L D
V E L V E T G K E I P O I
E L A T E D N E S S T I R
R E S T B R H A L T I N G
E T T G L O I R E E P E E
S P I C E N R G A B O R T
N A R K A G E I S T L G O
A R I S T O S V E L E A P
O V S O N T H E B U S E S
M E W L E I B N E P A L I
I N I A T R E P A N W I D
A U G H T E N T R A N C E

 

                THE BONUSES

Thematic        
Printed Clue Corrected Clue Letter Entry Bank Anagram
Grand Brand B MAKE KAME (a bank or ridge of gravel)
Gross Grass A NARK RANK (a bank can be defined as a ‘rank of things’ such as oars or keys on a keyboard)
Spark Spars S POLES SLOPE  (bank can be defined as ‘an upward slope’)
Poor? Maybe Pooh? Maybe H BEAR BRAE (Scottish word for a sloping bank or hill)
Mean joint Meat joint T TOPSIDE DEPOSIT (as a verb, ‘bank’ can mean ‘deposit’)
Eat plant Hat plant H SOLAH SHOAL (store; reserve; bank)
Adorns Adores E REVERES RESERVE (a store or stock; a bnak of things)
Not sound Not bound B FREE REEF (shoal or bank)
Knocker Knacker A TIRE TIER (rank; see above)
Lamest Lament N DIRGE RIDGE (a long narrow top or crest, sloping on both sides; bank)
Green Greek K ARGIVE RIVAGE (bank, shore)
Robin of Fife Rosin of Fife S ROSET STORE (hoard, reserve, bank)

 

 

Across
No. Clues Wordplay Entry
1 Fear violent criminal gang making further claim (8) Anagram of (violent) FEAR + FIRM (criminal gang, British slang; surprisingly not given in Chambers) REAFFIRM (assert strongly, again; further claim))
9 Three old women are running about in Georgia (6) (Anagram of [running] ARE + A [about]) all contained in (in) GE (International Vehicle Registration for Georgia) GRAEAE (three sea-godesses, sisters of the Gorgons, having the form of old women who shared between them a single eye and a single tooth)
10 Open country featured in travel documentary (4) Hidden word in (in) TRAVEL DOCUMENTARY VELD (in South Africa, open unforested or thinly forested grass-country)
11 Sofia’s ready to withdraw check – that’s soft (6) LEV (currency [ready money] of Bulgaria [whose capital city is Sofia]) reversed (to withdraw) + VET (check) VELVET (a soft fabric with a close cut pile)
12 Hawaiian paste, one with wee container (3) PO (shortened version of CHAMBERPOT a container for urine [wee]; a wee container) + I (one) POI (A Hawaiian dish, a paste of fermenteded taro root)
13 In recession, send drug with old packaging ecstasy (10) STALE (old) containing (packaging) (SEND + E [Ecstasy; drug]), all reversed (in recesssion)  (ELAT (E DNES) S) ELATEDNESS (ecstasy  – a different meaning from the drug referred to in the wordplay)
16 Support all others (4) REST (support; e.g. a rest used in Snooker) REST (all others)
18 Prince can start to get awkward (7) HAL (reference Prince Henry; Prince Hal) + TIN (can) + first letter G (start to) of GET HALTING (awkward)
20 Honour of French government one’s learning about (6) G (government) + (LORE [learning] containing [about] I [one]) GLOIRE (French word meaning glory, honour; Honour of French)
22 Goalie, not wingers, brought back point? (4) KEEPER (reference goalkeeper; goalie) excluding first and last letters (wingers) K and R, all reversed (brought back) ÉPÉE (a sharp pointed narrow bladed sword)
23 Relish City ‘extras’ being reviewed – time for cut? (5) EC (City; First part of the Postcode of East Central London) +TIPS excluding (for cut) T (time), all reversed (being reviewed) SPICE (relish)
25 Abandon America? Maybe Derek’s right (5) A (American) + BO (reference Bo Derek, film actress and model) + RT (right) ABORT (abandon)
27 A dominating principle for discriminating type (6) A + GEIST (inspiring or dominating principle) AGEIST (one who discriminates on the grounds of age)
29 Upper class bum turned drunkard (7) ARIS (arse; bum) + (SOT [drunkard] reversed [turned]) ARISTOS (aristocrats; upper class)
30 Bound over after changing plea (4) Anagram of (changing) PLEA LEAP (bound over)
32 Show where both Sues nearly end up (10, three words) Anagram of (up) BOTH SUES and END, excluding the final D (nearly) ON THE BUSES (Television show broadcast from 1969 to 1973 starring Reg Varney)
34 Gull in shed (3) MEW (a gull) MEW (shed, moult or cast)
36 Asian English circus performer moving north (6) E (English) + PALIN (reference Michael Palin, a member of the cast of Monty Python’s Flying Circus [I leave it you to decide whether Sarah Palin has any connection to a circus]) where the N (north) is moved to the beginning NEPALI (native of Nepal; Asian)
38 Country not democratic (4) INDIA (country) excluding D (democratic) INIA (not defined; an anagram of IAIN, reference IAIN BANKS, mainstream fiction writer.  I think he also writes science fiction as IAIN M BANKS)
39 Saw foreign partner run off (6) Anagram of (foreign) PARTNER excluding (off) R (run) TREPAN (a cyclindrical saw for perforating the skull)
40 A tiny bit risqué essentially (5) NAUGHTY (risqué) excluding the first and last letters leaving the inner (essential) part AUGHT (a tiny bit)
41 Suspicion about name on nurse’s door (8) EN (Enrolled Nurse) + (TRACE [suspicion] containing [about] N [name]) ENTRANCE (door)

 

Down
No.

Clue)

 Wordplay Entry
2 Small hole in the box you lifted (6) TELE (television; ‘the box’) + YE (you) all reversed (lifted) EYELET (small hole to receive a lace or a cord)
3 Trouble in the house – debate initially abandoned (3) DAIL (the lower House of the legislature of the Republic of Ireland) excluding (abandoned) D the first letter (intially) of DEBATE AIL (trouble)
4 Number of Golf? (3) RE (about; of) + G (GOLF is the international radio code word for the letter G) REG (short form of REGISTRATION NUMBER; a GOLF is also a model of Volkswagen car so it can have a REG)
5 Welshman in yard taking sun (4) REE ([Scottish word for] an enclosure or partially-roofed yard) + S (sun) REES (common Welsh Christian name)
6 Old TV is bad for encasement theorist (5) Anagram of (bad) O (old) and TV IS OVIST (a believer in the doctrine that the ovum contains all future generations in germ; encasement theorist)
7 Clan determined to hold on to power (4) SET (determined) containing (hold on to) P (power) SEPT (originally in Ireland a division of a tribe; a clan)
8 He distantly conveyed a bit of emotion in role – odd! (7) E (first letter of [a bit of] EMOTION) + an anagram of (odd) IN ROLE ELOINER (one who conveys an object to a distance)
14 Moving out of Poplar – it’s ardly on the up (5) Hidden word (out of) reversed (on the up) in POPLAR ITS ARDLY ASTIR (moving)
15 Driver’s about turn (6) DR (driver) + ON (about) + GO (turn) DRONGO (not defined; an anagram of GORDON, reference GORDON BANKS, English goalkeeper in the World Cup winning team of 1966)
17 Moan about league defeat (5) BEAT (defeat) containing (about) L (league) BLEAT (moan)
19 Let learner manoeuvre slowly (5) L (learner) + EASE (manouevre slowly) LEASE (let)
21 Ignoring daughter’s terrible rage (3) DIRE (terrible) excluding (ignoring) D (daughter) IRE (rage)
24 Parish goddess snubbed vulgar arriviste (7) PAR (parish) +VENUS (goddess), excluding the final (cut short; snubbed) S PARVENU (someone newly risen into wealth, notice or power, especially if vulgar or exhibiting an inferiority complex; vulgar arriviste)
26 Scotsman’s doctor kept upsetting her (5) IAN (Gaelic Christian name; Scotsman) containing (kept) MO (Medical Officer; doctor), all reversed (upsetting) NAOMI (girl’s name; her)
28 Alice struggles with German language (6) G (German) + anagram of (struggles) ALICE GAELIC (a language)
31 A little sherry – judge’s drink (4) S (first letter of [a little] SHERRY) + WIG (judge [slang]) SWIG (drink)
33 Clear division on court reportedly (4) NETT (sounds like (reportedly) NET [tennis net; division on court) NETT (clear of all charges or deductions)
35 Peak Bill’s climbing (3) NEB (beak or bill) reversed (climbing) BEN (peak, e.g. Ben Nevis)
37 Bristle with anger outside – tent’s gone (3) ANGER excluding GER (Mongolian yurt; tent) containing (outside) W (with) AWN (beard of barly or similar bristly growth)

8 Responses to “Inquisitor 1173: Not Fare by Lato”

  1. Chesley says:

    I enjoyed this puzzle but I’m afraid the sporting reference and “moved on” were lost on me, hence unable to get THE BONUSES.

    Thanks for the blog making everything clear.

  2. HolyGhost says:

    Not too hard, not too easy.

    I didn’t understand “sorry, 4″ in the preamble – so thanks Duncan; and I don’t get the title either.

  3. nmsindy says:

    Great fun puzzle from Lato. I think the title is a pun on “The Bonuses” are “Not fair” with fare coming from the buses. My solving experience was the reverse of yours with the central part coming first and struggling with the anagrammed banks. Thanks, Lato, and Duncan.

  4. Simon Harris says:

    Too hard for me, I’m afraid. Despite a grid almost filled, there were a few details that I didn’t spot, so was not able to submit this week. Thanks yet again to Duncan for clearing things up.

  5. Alan Goddard says:

    I rather like the title explanation from nmsindy. Grid completed but completely failed to cotton on to the requirement to move “on” even though “on the buses” was clearly the answer that upset Lato from the apology to Reg. So I too was unable to submit.

    Does anyone know what the normal level of submitted solutions to Inquisitor is?

  6. Lato says:

    Many thanks for the blog and comments.

    Yes, nmsindy’s explanation of the title was spot-on.

  7. HolyGhost says:

    In response to Alan’s question (@5): Does anyone know what the normal level of submitted solutions to Inquisitor is?

    – I seem to recall that Mike Laws once commented that the usual number of submissions was measured “by the bucket-load”.

  8. Hi of hihoba says:

    I asked Mike a year or more ago about the number of Inquisitor entries and his reply was “I wish I knew!”

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