Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Everyman No 3,376

Posted by Stella on June 19th, 2011

Stella.

A straightforward offering from Everyman this week, with a number of fairly obvious anagrams and charades, but none the less enjoyable for it, and with a couple new expressions – for me at least.

Across
1. Record of things wanted is brought in whilst out (4,4)
WISH LIST *IN WHILST
5. Keep limited opener for Somerset at crease (6)
SCRIMP S(omerset)+CRIMP=’crease’
10. English resort, one on the Isle of Wight duke disregarded (3)
RYE RY(d)E

11. See sign of support (11)
VINDICATION V=’see’, (from Latin ‘vide‘)+INDICATION =’sign’
12. Substitute to change number at end of game (9)
ALTERNATE ALTER+N(umber)+AT+(gam)E
13. Boringly repetitive, for example, crossing Maine (5)
SAMEY ME (Maine) in SAY
14. Teach those troubled by wound to focus on what’s important (3,2,3,5)
CUT TO THE CHASE *TEACH THOSE after CUT=wound
17. Welsh hero surprisingly wore down foe, ultimately capturing valley (4,9)
OWEN GLENDOWER *WORE DOWN (fo)E around GLEN
21. Boy another left out (5)
KEVIN KE(l)VIN
23. More than one publican doesn’t tell the truth about ugly scene (9)
LICENSEES LIES aroud *SCENE
24. Small backers chasing underworld gang (5,6)
HELL’S ANGELS S+ANGELS after HELL

25. Reportedly purchase extra (3)
BYE sounds like “buy”
26. Quiet lift gets approval (6)
PRAISE P+RAISE
27. Hungry? Tureen is specially prepared (8)
ESURIENT *TUREEN IS

A completely new word for me, though the anagram was quite obvious.

Down
1. Capital used to be chilly and damp, upon reflection (6)
WARSAW WAS RAW reversed

2. Show places etc abroad (9)
SPECTACLE *PLACES ETC
3. Fast runner, potentially, always allowed to go round (7)
LEVERET EVER in LET, for this young “runner”

4. Drink in country with cast (9,5)
SINGAPORE SLING SINGAPORE+SLING

I’m no fan of cocktails, and only know the names of a few, this not being one of them :)

6. Remarkably typical college girl in charge (7)
CLASSIC C(ollege)+LASS+IC
7. Expression used by one daughter on the Isle of Man (5)
IDIOM 1+D+I.O.M.
8. Girl embarrassed producing old postage stamp (5,3)
PENNY RED PENNY+RED

Less well known than its black counterpart :)

9. Enjoy article on Victorian novelist a lot (4,3,7)
LIKE THE DICKENS A self-explanatory charade
15. Pleasant, a US actor ringing about European (9)
AGREEABLE A (Clark) GABLE round RE+E
16. Atelier husband found in Notts town (8)
WORKSHOP WORKSOP around H(usband)
18. Book an old pop group (7)
GENESIS Double definition

For the group, see here

19. Bandy words in castle (7)
WINDSOR *WORDS IN, anagrind “bandy”
20. Express agreement when told to go (6)
ASSENT AS+SENT
22. Very sick adult in holiday home (5)
VILLA V+ILL+A

9 Responses to “Everyman No 3,376”

  1. sidey says:

    Esurient explained http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3KBuQHHKx0

  2. Mystogre says:

    Thank you Stella for the blog of a gentle ramble of a crossword. I found it pretty straightforward although I did have to look up Welsh heroes. We didn’t learn about such people over here. But I did like that clue and 23ac. The new word, for me, was SAMEY. Had to look it up to see if it existed. But, like the rest of the crossword, the clue worked fine.

    This one was more accessible than the current one.

  3. Bryan says:

    Many thanks Stella for an excellent analysis, as always, but you really scared me with your image of the Hell’s Angel.

    Everything straightforward except for SINGAPORE SLING which I’d never heard of – not even when I visited Singapore – but I guessed it correctly anyway. Moreover, I am certainly not tempted.

    However, I bet that Eileen, Sil and several others have rushed out to get a swig while Uncle Yap probably keeps all the ingredients in his cocktail cabinet.

  4. scchua says:

    Thanks Stella, and the setter (Everyman’s his pseudonym?) for a straightforward puzzle.

    Your photo of the Singapore sling scares me more than that of the Hell’s Angel! That’s a glass from the Raffles Hotel, where the drink(?) was supposedly invented, for the colonials, in the Long Bar, which in the renovated hotel is still serving it, with the glass thrown in at a special price, to entice tourists(?). Definitely not what I’d like to see as a Singapore icon. Tastes of course differ, but my advice would be don’t – tried it once and I recall it reminded me of a mix of mouthwash and toothpaste! Never taken it since and never recommend it to any visitor – you were fortunate, Bryan.

  5. AJK says:

    Finished without aids, but some nice clues. I liked RYDE becoming RYE (which is an interesting historical town- one of the ‘cinque’ ports).

  6. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thanks for the colourful blog, Stella.

    A gentle puzzle for a lazy Sunday morning. OWEN GLENDOWER and LEVERET I specially liked. I had vaguely heard of ESURIENT – probably through crosswords.

  7. Bamberger says:

    I don’t think was as easy for the less able such as myself as comments above would indicate.
    17a Got Owen ok but never heard of Glendower and without crossing letters, I couldn’t get it.
    27a Again without crossing letters this was nigh on impossible. Ok could have used a solver -but not really the point.
    9d Not an expression I’m familiar with -though my mother says she is.
    As 17a & 9d were long answers,not getting them made the answers to other clues harder than they might have been.

  8. Stella Heath says:

    Thanks for the link, Sidey :lol:, and to the rest of you for your comments. I’m now glad I’d never heard of the cocktail.

    Sorry you found it tough, Bamberger. Do persevere, and remember that crossing letters are an integral part of the fun. If we could get the whole puzzle without them, it would quite detract from the exercise.

    Personally, I’m more familiar with the exclamation “What the Dickens..?!” expleted by my mother on more than one occasion, usually when one – or even all eight – of us had been up to something :)

  9. Robi says:

    Thanks Everyman and to Stella for an excellent, pictorial blog.

    Didn’t get the v=see in VINDICATION. OWEN GLENDOWER had to be Googled and I didn’t know ESURIENT, although thanks to sidey for the excellent link, which hopefully will enable me to remember it. Bandy was an unusual anagrind, but it is in my list so must have been used before and provided a good surface. I particularly liked LEVERET.

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