Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent 7810/Tees

Posted by John on October 27th, 2011

John.

Some excellent clues in a very nice crossword today from Tees. One or two of them I couldn’t understand properly but I suspect that as usual all will be made clear.

My apologies for the lateness of this blog: I decided to replace the inverted commas with < or > and this completely confused the system, which thought they were some sort of HTML. Then I failed for a long time to get things back to the right form. No time to look for a Nina, which is probably there and quite obvious, but isn’t immediately apparent; to me, anyway.

Across
1 IMPALED — “I’m” for “compiler’s”, then pal ed, with definition “killed for a vampire”. “I am” is equivalent to “compiler is”.
5 REFUSAL — (Seal-fur)* — refusal as in “first refusal”
9 DOCTOR WHO — do then w in (cohort)*, definition “the time being”
10 TAMPA — (ap(ma)t)rev.
11 STAY THE COURSE — def “Maybe last in battle”, with “last” a verb, (at Troy see such)* — brilliant clue
13 A TOM BO(M)B
15 JULIUS — a complete mystery to me at the time of solving and now that I’ve pressed “Reveal” it’s no clearer — presumably there is an actress called Lucy Julius, but there is no apparent evidence of this [No legal right to arrest actress Lucy]
17 EXODUS — (does Ux{bridge})*
19 PAST RAM I — a pastrami is a smoked joint — another excellent clue with a well-disguised definition
22 JOSEPH WISEMAN — another mystery, since I’ve never heard of Joseph Wiseman; at least this time I can understand the wordplay: it’s j [= justice] (hopes)* wise man [= magus] and presumably the definition is “No”, but … (Later: ah, I see it’s Dr No — very nice)
25 YEA ST — much simpler than it seemed at first and not a reference to the Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
26 SHIMMERED — him in (Mrs Dee)*
27 E YE DR OP — def “look better given this”
28 LI(ON)ES S — two slight gripes here: a) does “talking continuously” mean “on”? Perhaps in some way it does, but it seems that if you talk continuously you only go on and on, and b) “with” as a link-word, a bête noire of mine which I know cannot really be justified, but I still don’t like it
 
Down
1 {W}INDY — clever clue: “us” is the Indy, and I was looking for a six-letter word with “us” in it that meant “welsh”
2 PI C(ASS)O — I’m not quite sure why an ass is a holy mount, for surely “pi” = “devout” here? [Artist in devout company guarding holy mount]
3 LO OF A, “bath” = “Bath”
4 DOWNTIME — I can’t quite see this: it seems to be a Spoonerism of “town dime”, where “town” = “settlement” and “dime” = “money”, but why is “town dime” = “money in settlement”? And is “doing nothing” an adequate definition of “downtime”?
5 RIO T{rash} E{verything} R{ob} — &lit. — a lovely topical clue with August the month not the adjective
6 FIT TO BUST — 2 defs with a nice surface
7 SAMURAI — Ur in (Masai)*
8 LEADERSHIP — def “Best party people” — (are LSD E)* hip
12 J’A{I}ME S JOYCE
14 BLUE PETER — “blue” = “politically conservative”, “peter” = “safe”, ref the programme
16 CA(T’ SKI)LL — the Catskill are mountains in America (corrected — thanks Sil)
18 ON(STAG)E — Tees would have liked this to be “doe’s partner”, since a doe’s partner is a stag and “does’ partners” is “stags”, but this is just about OK I think because a stag will have a number of partners, so “does partner” is to be read as “one who has a number of does as partner”
20 AINTREE — a very clever clue: it’s “a in tree”, which can be interpreted as “an arboreal a”
21 OWNS UP — (snow)* up, where “up” = “the trouble”, as in “what’s up?”
23 MA MB 0
24 wOrDlEsS

21 Responses to “Independent 7810/Tees”

  1. Sil van den Hoek says:

    Thanks John, in 15ac JULIUS is JUS (legal right) around LIU (actress Lucy Liu). But the definition? Must be “No” (again). have to think about that (and some others).

  2. Sil van den Hoek says:

    Ah, I see, Julius is the first name of Dr. No! There you are.

  3. Paul A says:

    2d – ass a holy mount as in being ridden by Jesus, maybe

  4. Sil van den Hoek says:

    According to Chambers a mount can be “A horse, etc that’s ridden”. So, could be a donkey. And Jesus rode an ASS – a ‘holy mount’. Maybe that’s it.

    John, I saw the letter T in 16d [which you explained as ‘T] as the first letter of ‘the’ [written downwards it is the ‘northern’ character in that word].

    Nice clue for JAMES JOYCE (12d). Initially I was looking for a writer whose first name was ‘Jaime’ – there could have been one [but there wasn’t (a famous one)].
    And how good to see Tees being true to his views on ‘grammar’ in this clue (given some discussions in another part of this website): “I must …” :)

  5. Gervase says:

    Thanks, John.

    I had some difficulty with the parsings here – I didn’t catch the significance of the Noes, and missed the clever A IN TREE, though I solved the clue. But I did recognise ‘ass’ as ‘holy mount’.

    Some excellent clues with great surfaces and misleading definitions here. I particularly liked ‘(for) the time being’ as the definition for 9a, although to be pedantic, DOCTOR WHO is the name of the programme and not the central character, who is more properly ‘The Doctor’.

  6. Thomas99 says:

    The Joyce clue really is brilliant – you don’t have to get all the references to solve it but they must be deliberate – JJ did indeed live in Paris for a long time and “Penman” refers to a character (if that’s not too straightforward a term) in Finnegans Wake (written mainly in Paris) – “Shem the Penman” is chapter I.7 – who is amongst other things a self-portrait.

  7. MikeC says:

    Thanks John and Tees. An excellent puzzle. I had no idea why JULIUS and JOSEPH WISEMAN were correct but the word play was irresistible. Thanks for explaining these, Sil. Is 4 (DOWNTIME) a kind of double reversal – not dime in town but town in dime, the former itself spoonerised? A bit of a struggle, though the crossing letters and definition left no room for doubt as to the answer. 6 (FIT TO BUST) had rather a Paul-ine feel to it (which is high praise, in my book).

  8. Kathryn's Dad says:

    Thank you, John.

    Beyond me today, I’m afraid. Tees has always struck me as one of those compilers who is in the ‘here’s a few straightforward ones to get you going’ camp; that was true today, but I couldn’t work out the last half dozen or so. But I liked DOCTOR WHO and PICASSO. On which point, it surely is a biblical reference: an ASS is a DONKEY, which Jesus rode into Jerusalem on what has become known as Palm Sunday. Or of course it could be ‘Little Donkey, carry Mary, safely on her way’. Although I suppose Mary wasn’t actually holy when she was astride said beast, because she hadn’t dropped the sprog at that stage.

    One for those that like harder stuff today, I think. And nowt wrong with that.

  9. Thomas99 says:

    PS. re 4d – I can’t see any problems with that clue. “The town X” is a conventional way of saying “The X in the town” (substitute museum or whatever for X), so there is no problem with “town dime” being clued by “money in settlement”. And “doing nothing” isn’t a contentious way of cluing “down time”, is it? I can’t imagine why anyone would think it was. Chambers: “a period when work is halted”.

  10. Tees says:

    … nb the def is actually ‘while doing nothing’.

  11. Allan_C says:

    Challenging but not too difficult. Although I saw the film of Dr No back in the sixties I remembered neither the character’s first name nor the actor who played him. So having tentatively put in JOSEPH WISEMAN from the wordplay I was quite surprised on googling him to find why he was memorable and hence what the ‘no’ in the clue signified. And similarly with JULIUS. Two very clever clues.

    A few other doctors scattered around in clues or answers; though hardly comprising a theme, methinks.

    Favourites? FIT TO BUST (for the smile it produced) and CATSKILL (for the headscratching required).

  12. Thomas99 says:

    Oops – sorry Tees. Much better

  13. nmsindy says:

    Yes, like others, I found this hard and challenging (though I got there in the end) with some really excellent clues eg PASTRAMI, YEAST, INDY, RIOTER, LEADERSHIP. Thanks, Tees, and John (whose blog explained a couple where the wordplay escaped me).

  14. Eileen says:

    Thanks for the blog, John.

    A little late to the party today [I’ve been out since mid-day] but I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed this.

    I thought 2dn was brilliant. I blogged Rufus’ Guardian PI LOT [‘religious group’] on Monday, so ‘devout company’ [PI CO] leapt out at me but ‘holy mount’ [which would normally, to me, suggest SINAI, TABOR, IDA, PARNASSUS, HELICON …] cluing ‘ass’ made me laugh out loud.

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen the whole of a James Bond film but the cluing of 22ac was so good that I got the answer and then, like Allan_C, was surprised to see who Joseph Wiseman was, revealing the virtually hidden definition,’No’- super clue.

    Naturally, I didn’t know Dr No’s first name, so, similarly, I got 15ac purely from the wordplay – a really original way to clue and define this word.

    Many thanks, Tees!

  15. dialrib says:

    ‘Fit to burst’ is common enough but I don’t recall coming across ‘fit to bust’ before.

  16. scchua says:

    Thanks John and Tees.
    This was en excellent solve for me, I think the best Tees I’ve come across. Amongst others, I ticked the 2 No’s JULIUS and JOSEPH WISEMAN, 9A DOCTOR WHO for its clever and misdirecting definition and 6D FIT TO BUST for its cheeky surface.

  17. Allan_C says:

    dialrib @ 15; I’ve always encountered it as ‘fit to bust’ but I see that both forms are given in the Macmillan dictionary – see http://www.macmillandictionary.com/thesaurus/british/fit_41#laughing-crying-coughing-fit-to-bust-burst_1
    And btw, googling the expression shows that it has been adopted as the name of a lingerie shop in Leeds, and is also the title of a book: “Fit to Bust: How great companies fail, by Tim Phillips.” – see http://www.director.co.uk/MAGAZINE/2011/4_April/books-fit-to-bust_64_08.html

  18. Uncle Yap says:

    I normally do not come here as I would have solved the puzzle hours ago and by the time the blog and the comments appear, I would be having dinner or drinks with friends or watching tv. But this morning, when Dr G and I solved this together, we had so much fun and laughter at the cleverness of Tees that I must come here and participate. First a big Thank You to Tees for a fantastic collection of clues.

    The mini-theme of the first James Bond film, Dr No (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._No_%28film%29) was presented so well that my COD must be 22A for that irresistible def “No” with 15A as a close second, again for that same audacious def. Bravo, Paul!

  19. Tees says:

    Looks like you enjoyed this one – I’m really glad! Thanks to everyone who commented, and especially to John for his blog.

  20. flashling says:

    Late on parade, still wearing suit after interview, went ok thanks for asking. found this tough and flummoxed by the NOs as I tried to do this on a train with no access to resources and failed a bit, thanks to all who knew better and PB/Tees for a toughie.

  21. dialrib says:

    Thanks, Allan_C

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