Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Inquisitor 1205: Poet and Poem by Loda

Posted by duncanshiell on December 7th, 2011

duncanshiell.

The preamble told us that "solvers must fill in the central cell and highlight the poet and the poem in the completed grid (14 squares in total, in a logical order).  The perimeter consists of the poem’s opening, after the title, and 10 answers are to be relevantly mutilated before entry.  Almost half of the remaining clues contain an extra word, the first letter of which, in order, spelling out the the poem’s conclusion."

It was fairly easy to deduce which entries had to be mutilated, as there were ten grid locations where the cells available for the entry were shorter than the answer length given in  the clue

This was a puzzle where the first penny dropping moment, for me, came when I realised that the final words of the poem’s conclusion were going to be  MY SON.  This gave me the link to the theme – RUDYARD  KIPLING‘s poem IF - http://www.kipling.org.uk/poems_if.htm

The full conclusion is YOU’LL BE A MAN, MY SON!

Having got the conclusion, the perimeter could then be completed as [IF] YOU CAN KEEP YOUR HEAD WHEN ALL ABOUT YOU ARE LOSING THEIRS

By this point, I had already got an inkling that a few entries were losing all or some of their opening letters before entry into the grid – e.g. BEANPOLE, FLOORER and EMBOSSED – so my initial thought was that all the mutilated entries were to lose their opening letters (heads).  However, when I solved NEATNESS I realised this couldn’t be the case and I had to look at ‘head’ in another way.

The second penny drop moment was realising that we were looking to omit words that meant ‘head’ in one of its range of interpretations, or words that are closely associated with ‘head’

In clue order, we had to omit

Word omitted  Meaning 
NOB head (informal)
TOP the highest or most important position in an organisation; head of the organisation
LOO in the sense of ‘toilet’ (a ship’s toilet in particular)
BOSS chief or leader; head
BLOCK head (as in the sense of ‘knock someone’s block off’)
NUT head (informal)
RAS head[land]; Arabic word for ‘head’
BRAIN central nervous system within the skull; clearly associated with head, but not, I think, a straight definition
NESS head[land]
BEAN head (informal)

 

I was slightly disappointed that we ended up with some entries that were not words, but I suspect that would have been a step too far for the compiler.

As I wrote the blog I noted that the clue constructs wre fairly simple, being composed of only one or two components in most cases – anagrams, charades and container & content.  There is nothing wrong with that as the puzzle was very satisfying across all its elements.  There were one or two clues where there 3 or 4 components – e.g. EULOGI(S)E and LA(ZIL)Y

On completing the grid, I then turned to the highlighting.  RUDYA was standing out down the middle of column 5, with RD IP apparent in the middle of column 7.  This led to the conclusion that the blank cell needed a K to give us RUDYARD KIP.  The final search therefore was for LING.  With the vertical nature of RUDYA and RDKIP it seemed that we had the basis of the capital letters I and F, so the logical place to find LI and NG was on the horizontal lines of the F.  THis idea proved correct and we generated the final grid shown below with 14 cells of RUDYARD KIPLING highlighted in a way that displayed IF in the grid.

 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

There were 44 clues in the puzzle, 10 required the answer to be mutilated before entry.  That left 34, of which 16 (almost half) contained redundant words.

The title, POET and POEM is self explanatory – RUDYARD KIPLING and IF.  

LODA is the second most prolific setter of Inquisitor puzzles at 33, exceeded only by SCHADENFREUDE at 38

Another good Inquisitor.

Across  
No Clue Redundant Word Letter Wordplay Solution Omit Entry
7 Stokes’ smart to involve the Queen looking down on others (8)

 

 

(S [stokes; the CGS {centimetre-gram-second} unit of kinematic viscosity, equal to 10-4 square metres per second, named after Sir George Stokes {1819 -1903}, British physicist] + NOBBY [smart]) containing (involve) ER (Elizabeth Regina; the Queen)

S NOBB (ER) Y

SNOBBERY (looking down on others) NOB SBERRY
10 Premier’s drunk, without tie (9)

 

 

TOPER (drunk) containing (without [outwith]) DRAW (tie)

TOP (DRAW) ER

TOP-DRAWER (highest level of society; premium) TOP DRAWER
12 Treat gay to piece of lint for earache (6)

 

 

Anagram of (treat) (GAY TO and  L, first letter of [piece of] LINT)

GAYTOL*

OTALGY (earache)   OTALGY
13 Unsuitable yellow pine nuts – tons! (5)

yellow

Y

Anagram of (nuts) PINE + T (tons)

PINE* T

INEPT (unsuitable)   INEPT
15 Closely confronting thrice to obtain ecstasy (two, one swallowed) (8)

obtain

O

( TO + TO + TO [thrice TO] containing one occurrence of [one swallowed] E [ecstasy]) + E (ecstasy)

TO (E) TO TO E

TOE-TO-TOE (closely confronting)   TOETOTOE
16 Stumper role for Batty? (7)

 

 

Anagram of (batty) ROLE FOR

ROLEFOR*

FLOORER (an examination question one cannot answer; stumper) Note there is a wicketkeeper (stumper) Jonathan Batty who plays for Gloucestershire. LOO FRER
18 Flower-girl’s left yard, time to play (4)

 

 

LILY (flower used as a girl’s name; flower-girl) excluding (left) Y (yard) + T (time)

LIL T

LILT (to sing or play)   LILT
19 Reportedly, that chap will supply unlisted weapons, eg (4)

unlisted

U

HEEL (sounds like [reportedly] HE’LL [that chap will]) HEEL (to supply with [a] weapon[s])   HEEL
21 Long wavy shifting dune (4)

long

L

Anagram of (shifting) DUNE

DUNE*

UNDE (wavy)   UNDE
23 Edmunds’s clothed, some beds unmade (8)

 

 

Anagram of (unmade) SOME BEDS

SOMEBEDS*

EMBOSSED (Edmund [Spenser's] usage of EMBOSSED means ‘clothed’) BOSS EMED
24 Remove from pit without jam cleared (9)

 

 

UNBED (remove from bed; remove from pit) containing (without [outwith]) LOCK (jam)

UNB (LOCK) ED

UNBLOCKED (cleared) BLOCK

UNED

25 Growth on oak’s entirely covered by type of oil from the east (7)

 

 

ALL (entirely) contained in (covered by)  TUNG (wood oil obtained from the seeds of the tung tree) reversed (from the east)

G (ALL) NUT<

GALLNUT (a nut-like abnormal growth produced on an oak by a gall wasp) NUT GALL
27 Good ear gets sound of emptying bottle (4)

 

 

G (good) + LUG (ear)

G LUG

GLUG (a word representing the sound of liquid being poured from a bottle)   GLUG
29 At sea, a singer’s destroying … (7)

 

 

Anagram of (at sea) A SINGER’S

ASINGERS*

ERASING (destroying) RAS EING
30 … underwear in laundry, using pressure – make her change her mind (9)

 

 

BRA IN WASH (underwear in laundry)

BRAINWASH ( to subject a person to systematic indoctrination or mental pressure to make them change their views or confess to a crime, etc)

BRAIN WASH
31 Take care of cut legume (4)

 

 

GUARD (take care of) excluding the final letter (cut) D

GUARD

GUAR (a legume grown for forage)   GUAR
32 Ian’s bird – weird looking type (4)

looking

L

Anagram of (weird) TYPE

TYPE*

PYET (Scottish [Ian] word for a magpie)   PYET
34 Firing barmen – one’s into gin, unhappy (6)

barmen

B

Anagram of (unhappy) INTO GIN containing (into) I (one)

INTO (I) GIN*

IGNITION (firing)   IGNITION
37 Niger sacked former kingdom (5)

 

 

Anagram of (sacked) NIGER

NIGER*

REIGN (obsolete [former] word for ‘kingdom’)   REIGN
39 Remove metal type from one example (6)

 

 

UN (one, in some dialects) + LEAD (precedent; example)

UN LEAD

UNLEAD (remove metal type – a printing term)   UNLEAD
40 Port unfinished, tense evening appearance for Will (6)

evening

E

OSTEND (Anglicised name for Belgian port) excluding the final letter (unfinished) D + T (tense)

OSTEND  T

OSTENT (Shakesperean [Will] word for ‘appearance’)   OSTENT
41 Lady Liz Riley abandons about 2000 for rustic simplicity (5)    

Anagram of (riley [turbid, irritable])  LADY LIZ excluding (abandons) A (about) and Z (medieval Roman numeral for 2000)

LADYLIZ*

IDYLL (scene of rustic simplicity)   IDYLL
       

 

     
No. Clue Redundant Word

Letter

Wordplay Solution Omit Entry
1 Japanese aluminium coin’s old? Absolutely (5)

aluminium

A

O (old) + BANG (absolutely, as in ‘bang up to date’)

O BANG

OBANG (an old Japanese oblong gold coin)   OBANG
2 Coloured string of pearls’ unfinished, cut short (4)

 

 

C (coloured) + ROPE (string of pearls) excluding the last letter (unfinished) E

C ROPE

CROP (cut short)   CROP
3 Senate’s leadert from Nevada deployed an elegant quality (8)

 

 

Anagram of (deployed) SENATES and Nfirst letter of (leader of) NEVADA

SENATESN*

NEATNESS NESS NEAT
4 Metal crest’s from unearthed genouilliere (4)

metal

M

Hidden word in (from) UNEARTHED GENOUILLIERE EDGE (ridge or crest)   EDGE
5 Father’s advisory function is given by word of mouth (6)

advisory

A

PA (father) + ROLE (function)

PA ROLE

PAROLE (word of mouth; language as manifested in the speech of indiviuals)   PAROLE
6 Wine and honey drinks and battered lemon sole left out (8)

 

 

Anagram of (battered) LEMON SOLE excluding (out) L (left)

EMONSOLE*

OENOMELS (drinks made of wine mixed with honey)   OENOMELS
8 Smooth character’s leading cricket team (6)

 

 

EL (the letter L; character) + EVEN (smooth)

EL EVEN

ELEVEN (there are eleven players in a cricket team)   ELEVEN
9 Starts to notice fermenting lines of red yeasty growth on sherry (4)

notice

N

First letters of (starts to) FERMENTING LINES OF RED

FLOR (a yeasty growth which is allowed to form on the surface of sherry wines after fermentation and which gives them a nutty taste)

  FLOR
11 Scottish inventor and French painter denied water (4)

 

 

WATTEAU (reference Antoine WATTEAU [1684 - 1721], French painter) excluding (denied) EAU (French for ‘water’)

WATTEAU

WATT (reference James WATT [1736 - 1819], Scottish inventor   WATT
14 Girl’s muddled attempt to secure university degree (5)

muddled

M

TRY (attempt) containing (to secure) (U [university] and D [degree])

TR (UD) Y

TRUDY (girl’s name)   TRUDY
17 Begin decapitation of tenant (5)

 

 

RENTER (a tenant who pays rent) excluding the first letter of (decapitation of) R

RENTER

ENTER (begin)   ENTER
18 Portion of yarn contains two numbers for comedian Henry eg (5)

 

 

LEY (a measure [portion] of yarn) containing (N [number] and N [number])

LE (NN) Y

LENNY (reference Lenny Henry, comedian, and currently leading actor in Shakespeare’s Comedy Of Errors at the National Theatre)   LENNY
20 Extol Yugoslavian political bloc? Baird for one, is ultimately taken in (8)

yugoslavian

Y

EU (European Union; political bloc) + (S [last letter [ultimately] of IS contained in [taken in] LOGIE [reference John LOGIE Baird, inventor of the world's first practical and publicly demonstrated television system] )

EU LOGI (S) E

EULOGISE (extol)   EULOGISE
22 Despatching nine characters Arnie finally gets night flier (5)

 

 

SCHWARZENEGGER (reference Arnold [Arnie] SCHWARZENEGGER, actor, ex Governor of California) excluding (despatching) the first nine characters SCHWARZEN

SCHWARZENEGGER

EGGER ( any moth of the family Lasiocampidae, whose cocoons are egg-shaped; night flier)

  EGGER
26 Poem about Zambia with one living in the van with no desire to work (6)

 

 

LAY (poem) containing (about) (Z [International Vehicle Registration for Zambia] + I [one] + L, first letter of [in the van] LIVING)

LA (Z I L) Y

LAZILY (with no desire to work)   LAZILY
28 Fiddle about in middle of bag for old gold coin (6)

 

 

(GUE [a kind of viol formerly used in Shetland; fiddle] containing [about] IN) + A, the middle letter of (middle of) BAG

GU (IN) E A

GUINEA (old gold coin)   GUINEA
31 Jack up smack and senses fly (4)

senses

S

TANG (smack, in the sense of a distinctive or distinguishable flavour) reversed (jack up [down clue])

TANG<

GNAT (a fly)   GNAT
32 Open lab and start to experiment, developing lanky chap (8)

 

 

Anagram of (developing) OPEN LAB and E (first letter [start to] EXPERIMENT)

OPENLABE*

BEANPOLE (lanky chap) BEAN POLE
33 Ornamental eaglewood, silver with centre of lilac (5)

ornamental

O

AG (chemical symbol for silver) + ILA (middle three letters [centre of] LILAC)

AG ILA

AGILA (eaglewood)   AGILA
35 Enthusiastic about disused pub and telegraph office (4)

 

 

IN (Spenserian [disused] form of INN [pub]) + TO (telegraph office)

IN TO

INTO (enthusiastic about)   INTO
36 Immediately after a sixth ‘nightcap‘ bearing’s changed! (4)

nightcap

N

SEXT (a sixth in musical terminology) with (the S [south] changed to N [north]; bearing’s changed)

SNEXT

NEXT (immediately after)   NEXT
38 Taro’s eaten by abandoned dog (4)     Hidden word in (eaten by) ABANDONED DOG EDDO (the tubers of various plants, especially taro)   EDDO

2 Responses to “Inquisitor 1205: Poet and Poem by Loda”

  1. Hi of hihoba says:

    I, too, got this finished via the last line of the poem. I enjoyed the head references (particularly LOO!), and spent some time trying to involve the R to the bottom right of RUDYA in the poet’s name. It was only when I realised that we had 14 letters to form both the poet and the poem that I thought of using the RD in the middle row.

    Now Duncan has mentioned it, I realise that the clues were quite simple and conventional.

    An enjoyable solve, so thanks Loda.

  2. HolyGhost says:

    I’m a little reluctant to comment on this one, as I found it rather run-of-the-mill.

    Having realised that BEANPOLE had to be entered as POLE and GALLNUT as GALL, I pondered of the connection between the removed BEAN and NUT. My partner ventured “Vegetarian ingredients?” but I thought “No – head”. That, coupled with the somewhat mundane title, immediately led me to Kipling’s verse, the last line of which fitted with the extra letters I’d found.

    Highlighting: given that we were looking for 14 cells in total for the poet and the title of the poem, and that RUDYARD KIPLING has 14 letters with no replication between the two names, it seemed natural to look for the highlighted cells to form the shape IF. And that was that.

    And, yes, it was a pity that a number of the mutilated entries were not real words.

Leave a Reply

Don't forget to scroll down to the Captcha before you click 'Submit Comment'

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


7 + three =