Fifteensquared

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Financial Times 14,038 by Mudd

Posted by Pete Maclean on July 5th, 2012

Pete Maclean.

Prize puzzle from the Weekend FT of June 23

I found a good challenge in this Mudd. My favourite clues are 6D (TRADESMAN) and 26D (CABER). There is something in the wordplay of 11A (ELEVATION) that I do not understand.

Across
1. GOOD FOR NOTHING – anagram of NORTH FOOD in GOING (travelling)
10. BATON – BAT ON (don’t get out — as in cricket)
11. ELEVATION – EV (version of the Bible?) in ELATION (happiness). Do I have this wrong? I can find no confirmation that there is a Bible version identified as EV.
12. EVEREST – EVE, REST (advice from Adam after strenuous exercise)
13. STEAMER – T[axman] in SEAMER (bowler). A ‘seam bowler’ or simply ‘seamer’ is a cricket term.
14. TRACE – double definition
16. ROCK MUSIC – double definition
19. WILL POWER – P (penny) in WILLOW (wood) + ER (a little hesitation)
20. NEPAL – NE (Tyneside — i.e. the northeast) + PAL (friend)
22. GASTRIC – GAS (wind) + TRIC[e] (moment cut short)
25. EXCERPT – R[esult] in EXCEPT (though)
27. AGINCOURT – A GIN COURT (in which you might try a drink?)
28. BREVE – hidden word
29. LITTLE BOYS ROOM – anagram of TOILET OR SYMBOL

Down
2. ON THE NAIL – double definition
3. DANCE – C (Conservative) in DANE (European)
4. OVERTHROW – OVER THROW (unexpected run — in cricket, I assume)
5. NEEPS – NEE (born) + PS (may I add). ‘Neep’ is a Scots word for turnip. Haggis with “bashed neeps” is a fine thing!
6. TRADESMAN – anagram of AND MASTER
7. IDIOM – IDIOT (fool) with last letter changed (amended, finally)
8. GENERIC – GEN (knowledge) + ERIC (man)
9. ABSENT – A (a) + S (seconds) in BENT (talent)
15. EMPIRICAL – PI (irrational figure) in anagram of MIRACLE
17. CARPENTRY – CARP (fish) + ENTRY (access)
18. SUPERHERO – ER (queen) in anagram of ORPHEUS
19. WAGTAIL – WAG TAIL (do as a dog)
21. LATHER – LATHE (machine turning) + R (right)
23. SWIFT – double/cryptic definition
24. CRUMB – CRUM[pet] (breakfast item pet dispensed with). Hm, I think of crumpets as an afternoon-tea item, not something for breakfast.
26. CABER – BE (live) in CAR (vehicle)

7 Responses to “Financial Times 14,038 by Mudd”

  1. Rishi says:

    I think EV stands for English Version [of the Bible].

  2. Rishi says:

    Pete

    Re your comment at 4d. Your assumption is correct. In cricket, an overthrow is when fielders at the wicket to whom the ball is returned by another fielder is missed by them and it keeps rolling. Noticing this, the batsman, who might have initially stopped, may still run for a score. The run thus obtained is also called an overthrow, I think.

  3. exgnome says:

    Many thanks Pete.

    I whizzed through this until the brain went dead in the NW corner with 3d, 10a (where I was completely “stumped?”) and 9d.

    I also assumed EV = English Version.

    After this brief outburst of activity I shall now adjourn to follow the instruction per 12a!

  4. Pete Maclean says:

    Rishi, Thank you. I played cricket as a boy and enjoyed it but there are many of the finer points of the game that I am unfamiliar with (or maybe have just forgotten).

    Exgnome, I had difficulty with 3d as well. Even being sure that the answer had to be DANCE, I failed for a long time to make the wordplay work. But, in retrospect, it does not seem difficult!

  5. Bamberger says:

    I also failed on 3d . Procul Harum’s Whiter Shader of Pale didn’t come to mind “We tripped the light fandango…”
    Didn’t spot that 6d was an anagram even with T?a?e?m?n -how embarrassing is that?
    Also couldn’t get 25a and 28a -simply didn’t know breve.
    Finally couldn’t get 26d though I did think of car.

    Must do better.

  6. Pete Maclean says:

    ‘Trip’ for dance is rarely heard these days — except perhaps in that song. Ah, those super-boring music lessons in school proved useful after all. I learned about breves and semibreves!

    Must do better?? Maybe you should start blogging here. (Or do you already?) It is a powerful incentive to complete puzzles!

  7. Wil Ransome says:

    Who has crumpets for breakfast? I thought the clue for 24dn was decidedly odd, particularly as it seems the word could easily have been avoided.

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