Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Financial Times 14,068 by Cincinnus

Posted by Pete Maclean on August 9th, 2012

Pete Maclean.

Prize puzzle from the Weekend FT of July 28, 2012

This was a fine if perhaps undistinguished Cincinnus. I especially like 2D (PARODISTS), 14D (EMPATHISED) and 6D (INORDINATE).

Across
1. TIPPET – TIPPET[t] (composer’s short). The definition, ‘cape’, was new to me. One of my correspondents put in TALLIS which also means a prayer shawl; one could believe it correct although a shawl is not exactly a cape. In my original posting of this blog I had the explanation of this clue slightly wrong as I had neglected to ascertain the correct spelling of Sir Michael Tippett’s surname.
4. PERICLES – C[risis] in anagram of REPLIES
10. HARROWING – double definition
11. OUNCE – [b]OUNCE (rebound to avoid black)
12. TIDE – homophone (“tied”)
13. NAILED DOWN – anagram of AND OLD WINE
15. ASSUMED – anagram of MEDUSAS
16. PIN-UPS – IN (at home) in PUPS (youngsters)
19. ISRAEL – IS (is) + LEAR (king) backwards
21. BY TURNS – homophone (“bite earns”). Not a perfect homophone but close enough, I think.
23. ALL THE SAME – double definition
25. OMIT – [s]OM[e] [w]IT[h]
27. REMUS – R (right) + EMUS (birds)
28. OPEN HOUSE – O (old) + PEN (swan) + H (hot) + OUSE (river)
29. STANDS TO – STAND (bear) + STO[p]
30. GOETHE – GO (travel) + E (energy) + THE (article)

Down
1. TAHITIAN – A (a) + H (hospital) together in TITIAN (artist)
2. PARODISTS – anagram of STRIP AS DO
3. EROS – SORE (offended) backwards
5. EGG FLIP – EG (say) + G (Gee!) + FLIP (lose your cool)
6. INORDINATE – I (one) + N (point) + ORDINATE (line to a mathematician). I studied mathematics to an advanced level but did not know that ‘ordinate’ refers to a line such as the graph of y=c (where ‘c’ is a constant).
7. LINGO – hidden word
8. STERNE – STERN (austere) + E (English)
9. WIZARD – double/cryptic definition
14. EMPATHISED – anagram of SHAPED ITEM
17. PARAMOUNT – PAR[is] + A (a) + MOUNT (horse)
18. AS IT WERE – anagram of WATERSI[d]E
20. LASH OUT – AS (as) + H (heroin) together in LOUT (yob)
21. BOMBER – MB (storage unit, i.e. megabyte) in BOER (South African)
22. HARRIS – HARRI[er]S (aircraft dropping queen)
24. LEMMA – L[ondon] + EMMA (girl)
26. SHOO – SHOO[t] (fire dropping temperature)

5 Responses to “Financial Times 14,068 by Cincinnus”

  1. Sil van den Hoek says:

    Thanks Pete.
    “Fine if perhaps undistinguished Cincinnus”?
    I think it’s amazing how one can set smooth puzzles like this time after time after time (Dac in the Independent is another example).

    Just a couple of remarks.
    In 1ac the composer is Sir Michael TIPPETT (with double-T).
    So ‘Composer’s short’ is the construction, while the definition is just ‘cape’.
    The ellipsis in 21/22d makes perfect sense because, together, it gives us BOMBER HARRIS (Sir Arthur Travers Harris (1892-1984), Marshal of the RAF, responsible for bombing raids against German towns during WWII).

  2. mike04 says:

    Thank you for the blog, Pete.

    The word ORDINATE seems to have different uses in Mathematics:
    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/y-Axis.html

    For ABSCISSA, Chambers gives ‘the intercept between a fixed point and the foot
    of an ordinate: the x-coordinate in analytical geometry’.

    I’m wondering about the general equation of an ordinate.
    Should it not be something like “part of x=c (where c is a constant)”?

  3. Pete Maclean says:

    Sil, Ah, my bad for not knowing how to properly spell Sir Michael’s surname. Thank you for setting me straight. And I completely missed BOMBER HARRIS (whom I have heard of). Thank you again. I did think it slyly clever that ‘aircraft’ clues a singular word in one clue and a plural in the other.

    I totally agree that it’s amazing how Cincinnus can set smooth puzzles like this time and again. I did not mean to imply otherwise by my remark.

  4. Pete Maclean says:

    Mike04, Thanks for your input. As I said, I studied maths to a post-grad level and yet do not recall ever hearing the word ordinate. I also studied astronomy and do not remember ever hearing it used there either. And now I look it up, I find an ever expanding mess of meanings!

  5. john newman says:

    Pete/Mike04

    Another reason for forgetting Chambers. What nonsense!

    I missed the pups reasoning – thanks Pete

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