Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Independent on Sunday 1172/Raich

Posted by Pierre on August 13th, 2012

Pierre.

It looks like the blogger for Sunday’s Indy puzzle hasn’t been able to post, so here’s a no bells and whistles blog of a pleasing puzzle from Raich.

 

 

 

Abbreviations

cd  cryptic definition
dd  double definition
(xxxx)*  anagram
anagrind = anagram indicator
[x]  letter(s) missing

Across

1  Shoe seaman’s wearing very tight originally
SABOT
An insertion of AB for ‘sailor’ in SO and T.

4  Stick around a quiet street as bathroom item needed
WASHSTAND
An insertion of A SH and ST in WAND for ‘stick’.

9  One acknowledging being more irritable when condition introduced
TESTIFIER
A further insertion of IF for ‘condition’ in TESTIER.

10  Frame lease flexibly
EASEL
(LEASE)*

11  Transfer fighter’s aide
SECOND
A dd.  The two pronunciations are different, of course.

12  Remiss, the German priest is taken to court
DERELICT
A charade of DER, ELI and CT, for the sense of ‘dereliction of duty’.

14  Home, by side of strait, extremely leery in disrespectful way
INSOLENTLY
A charade of IN, SOLENT, and L[eer]Y.

16  On radio man’s become tiresome
PALL
Homophone of ‘Paul’.

19  Rest here in Tudor mansion
DORM
Hidden in tuDOR Mansion.

20  Obstruction stops new version of Western bulletin
NEWSLETTER
An insertion of LET in (WESTERN)*

22  Contrary talk
CONVERSE
A dd.

23  Think logically about an issue
REASON
A charade of RE and A SON.

26  Appropriate to keep a Romeo at a distance?
APART
An insertion of A and R for ‘Romeo’ in APT.

27  He defends American game – soldiers start to tease
APOLOGIST
A charade of A, POLO, GIS and T.

28  Decision to return to quiet place for exercise beside garden, having time
PRECEDENT
A charade of P for ‘quiet’, REC for ‘place for exercise’, EDEN and T.

29  Untrue iron’s accepted as well?  Not quite
FALSE
An insertion of ALS[O] in FE.

Down

1  “It’s safe” I’d represented, having no doubt
SATISFIED
(ITS SAFE ID)*

2  Graduate exactly reproduced computer language
BASIC
A charade of BA and SIC.

3  Complex situation snares Rhode Island figure
TRIANGLE
An insertion of RI in TANGLE.

4  Politician, up-to-date, supporting Welsh
WHIP
HIP underneath W for ‘Welsh’.

5  Crude air slurs me – in 1920s style?
SURREALISM
(AIR SLURS ME)*

6  Pressman enthralled by latest uprising in country?
SWEDEN
An insertion of ED in a reversal of NEWS.

7  He attacks when assumed name is brought up with resentment at heart
ASSAILANT
A charade of AS for ‘when’, a reversal of ALIAS, and the central letters of reseNTment.

8  Vessels supplied by Dutch, excellent lenders for trade, first of all?
DELFT
Initial letters of Dutch Excellent Lenders For Trade.

13  Speak with restraint about student era in new Assembly?
UNDERSTATE
(STUDENT ERA)*

15  Asking her about theft from store?
SHRINKAGE
(ASKING HER)*

17  Look right!  German almost caught something to make The Ring clearer?
LORGNETTE
A charade of LO, R, G and NETTE[D] for the opera glasses.

18  It’s fabulous in centre of Irwell river, travelling north
WEREWOLF
A charade of WE for the centre of irWEll and a reversal of FLOWER for ‘river’.

21  Pay bill for seat
SETTLE
A dd.

22  Winner’s got bite
CHAMP
And another.

This was a fine puzzle in the usual Sunday Indy style, which I haven’t really done justice to, but thanks to Raich anyway.

4 Responses to “Independent on Sunday 1172/Raich”

  1. Wanderer says:

    Thank you so much, Pierre, for stepping in to fill a gap, and to Raich for a puzzle which I found at the easier end of the IoS spectrum, and which really hit the spot for me.

    I was splendidly misdirected by the Wagnerian surface to 17d, LORGNETTE. With two crossing letters L???N???? I took one look at it and thought LOHENGRIN. My parsing? ‘Look’ = LO (but takes no account of the ‘right…); ‘German almost’ = HEN (well, a HEN is almost a HUN… yes, I know…) and GRIN is an anagram of the RING. Of course it made no sense but I spent a while trying to make it work until I had some more crossers. Also convinced myself that my politician at 4d was a WHIG and spent time trying to see how HIG = up-to-date. D’oh.

    Favourite was WEREWOLF. I’m sure we’re all familiar with the river=flower device, but I had never thought to find an everyday word containing a reversal of flower.

    Lovely stuff.

  2. allan_c says:

    Yes, thanks, Pierre, for filling the gap – and after doing the regular blog for the day!

    A nice steady solve and nothing too difficult, though I was led astray at first by some clues; for example in 4a ‘a quiet street’ suggested the sequence APST and I was looking for something involving taps until the penny dropped when I got some crossing letters. Must remember that ‘quiet’ can mean SH as well as P in future.

  3. Ali says:

    Sorry all, I was down to do this one and did write my blog yesterday, but got sidetracked offline before having had chance to polish it off and post.

    Pierre has more than adequately filled in for me here. Many thanks to him. For the record, here was what I was going to say in my intro: “This was great stuff from Raich. Lots of good clues, smooth surfaces and no uncertainties with the wordplay. Reminded me a lot of a Phi or Dac puzzle in fact, which I hope is high praise!”

  4. Raich says:

    Many thanks, Pierre (for standing in), and Ali also of course and to all for the kind remarks.

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