Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Financial Times 14,268 by Alberich

Posted by Jed on March 22nd, 2013

Jed.

Clever stuff – 6 down still a mystery

 

 

 

 

Across

8 CARAFE some wine RA[c] (service mostly) in CAFÉ (restaurant)

9 STOPOVER break for driver

ST (road) OP (work) OVER (finished)

10 AIDE assistant MEDIA< (press rejected) minus first letter

11 THE YEAR DOT when time began (THEORY DATE)*

12 UNDO cancel hidden in [undergro]UND O[rganisation]

13 INDISCREET ill-judged I DISC (record) in (ENTER)*

17 CAPE split dd head and gear

18 GALOP dance [h[A[l]L in GO (travel) P (page)

19 SARI garment put on S (second) IRA< George Gershwin’s brother (retrospective)

21 YESTERYEAR in the past (STARRY EYEE)* E swapped for D (daughter)

23 LAPS dd

24 PAWNBROKER uncle PAWN (tool) BROKE (damaged) R (run)

28 TORY politician [s]TORY (lie with top off)

29 NEOPHYTE novice (ONE)* PHYTE sounds like fight

30 STOKER dd (Bram) (furnace worker)

Down

1 HACIENDA country house (NICE)* in HAD (owned) A (academic)

2 MALEVOLENT mean-spirited

MALE (chap) V (very) O (old) LENT (fast)

3 LEFT-WINGER dd

4 ISLE of Man IS (lives) L[if]E

5 GORE blood OGRE (monster) moving G

6 ?O?R BOAR?

7 BECOME dd

14 DELVE dig D (died) [archeologica]L in EVE (day before)

15 SUPERGRASS informer (SE[t] UP)* [deale]R GRASS (drug)

16 RESOLUTION analysis (NEUROLOGIST)* minus G (good)

20 REPARTEE &lit

PER< (through come back) ART (skill) EE sounds like EASE (in conversation)

22 ENAMEL protection for teeth (canines) MAN (staff) in LEE (shelter)< (set back)

25 NAPE scruff N (new) [c]APE (answer to 17ac)

26 RAYS beams sounds like RAISE (pay increase)

27 KEEL part of hull KEEL[e] (university cut)

( )* = anagram    [ ] = omit    < = reverse    dd = double definition

9 Responses to “Financial Times 14,268 by Alberich”

  1. Muffyword says:

    6 down is BO(x)ER.

    The other East London

  2. Muffyword says:

    Oh, and I decided the “service” in CARAFE was better as RA(f), not that it matters.

  3. crypticsue says:

    Very enjoyable thankyou Alberich and Jed too.

    I agree with both of Muffword’s explanations.

  4. Alchemi says:

    Actually, 6d is a solecism. There are people in London who self-identify as Scots, but clueing SCOT as “from London perhaps” would be a bit unfair. The Eastern Cape was always British territory, so the only self-identifying Boers there are immigrants (or descendants of same) from other parts of South Africa.

  5. Monk says:

    Nice one Alberich! Some excellent misdirection and tight clueing here, thanks. An interesting question is raised by 23ac and 3dn, to wit: is the link-word “in” OK in a double-definition clue? One could argue that, in such a clue, the tref-to-some (qv recent blog on syntax in another place) [wordplay in definition] (cf 21ac ;)) is equivalent to the kosher-to-all [definition in wordplay], both being equal to [definition in definition].

  6. Pelham Barton says:

    Thanks Alberich for an enjoyable puzzle and Jed for the blog.

    Monk @5: I am a good deal happier with “in” as a link word either way round than the double definition at 17ac requiring us to split a clue word without a much stronger signal than a question mark. (But maybe I have misunderstood Alberich’s intentions.)

    7dn: This one made me smile because it was a clue I thought of myself some months ago, and too late to contribute to a discussion of anagram leads when someone tried out “suited”. It was, I think, generally agreed at the time that “suited” does not really work as an anagram lead. The clue at 7dn is a good one (to me, anyway) precisely because it relates to two genuinely different meanings of the answer, which is exactly why “suit” does not mean “change into”.

  7. Robi says:

    Good puzzle; thanks Albereich and Jed.

    I managed to get GALOP although I did have to check in Chambers. I failed to remember PAWNBROKER=uncle yet again – maybe next time.

    I particularly liked the SUPERGRASS.

  8. Ferret says:

    It could perhaps be argued that 17a is a triple definition as it could also be read as CAP (head) + E (gear as in drugs)?

  9. Sil van den Hoek says:

    As we (apparently) all agree, a nice crossword.
    Interesting point that Monk is making @5.
    The more I think about it, the more I dislike “in”.
    But, perhaps, after a good night’s sleep I feel different.

    17ac (CAPE) is a bit un-Alberich who usually keeps far away from ‘these things that we see all so very often nowadays’.
    Which, btw, doesn’t mean I reject them.

    My Clue of the Day was surely 27ac (KEEL), another one of these Lift & Separate devices that are typical of this great setter. 18ac is another fine example of it.

    I couldn’t get BOER (6d), but it didn’t spoil my day.

    Thanks to Jed for blogging.

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