Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

Everyman No. 3470 (7th April)

Posted by The Trafites on April 14th, 2013

The Trafites.

Lorraine: Another enjoyable puzzle from Everyman, but alas I fear I am running out of ways to praise the Everyman puzzle, so why not have a go! As always a big thank you to Everyman and a massive thank you to all of you, the fifteensquarer’s.

 

 

Across
1. Fail to avoid young lady (4)
MISS dd
3. Mount unlikely check, about work of little value (3,4,3)
NOT MUCH COP (MOUNT*)+CH+C+OP
9. Name one volatile gas (4)
NEON N+(ONE*)
10. TV lawyer, character defending army suspect (5,5)
PERRY MASON PERSON around (ARMY*)
12. Provider of childish amusement, card giving evidence? (4-2-3-3)
JACK-IN-THE-BOX JACK+’IN THE BOX’
14. Drink from trophy after Cambridge college lost at last (6,3)
CLARET CUP CUP after (CLARE[college]+(los)T)
16. Fortunate? Very possibly (4)
WELL cdd
17. Opposed to some in Constantinople (4)
ANTI hidden: constANTInople
18. Volunteers to feed US artist’s fish (5,4)
MANTA RAYS TA in MAN RAY’S
see US Artist Man Ray
20. One eager to leave bang on time caught guard breaking into cupboard (5-7)
CLOCK-WATCHER C+(WATCH in LOCKER)
24. Drudge recalled being beaten about at home (10)
CINDERELLA (RECALLED*) around IN
25. First to recognise a French character (4)
RUNE R(ecognise)+UNE[Fr. 'a'\'an']
26. Weak type, complete killjoy (3,7)
WET BLANKET dd
27. Extremely clever? Yes, to some extent (4)
VERY hidden: cleVER Yes
 ………………………………
Down
1. Leader of military junta shot head of charging animal (7)
MUNTJAC M(ilitary)+(JUNTA*)+C(harging)
2. They provide traction, as shown in broadcast about foremost of cars (4,6)
SNOW CHAINS (AS SHOWN IN*) around C(ars)
4. Clear above top of tower (5)
OVERT OVER+T(ower)
5. One keeping score by enclosure with a felt-tip (6,3)
MARKER PEN MARKER+PEN
6. Accepted the law needs changing in a protectorate (12)
COMMONWEALTH COMMON[accepted]+(THE LAW*)
7. Mould in shed (4)
CAST dd
8. Evergreen, over in glen, I pollarded (4)
PINE hidden rev.: glEN, I Pollarded
11. The enemy is bound to take its toll? Wait and see (4,4,4)
TIME WILL TELL TIME(cryptic pun ref. quote time is my enemy)+WILL TELL[is bound to take etc.]
13. Book desolate inn (5,5)
BLEAK HOUSE BLEAK+HOUSE; A novel by Charles Dickens.
15. Tell all to move nearer fair (4,5)
COME CLEAN COME+CLEAN[fair, as in 'clean fight']
19. Contemptible involving Church of England in witchcraft (7)
SORCERY SORRY around CE
21. Reportedly distraught playwright (5)
WILDE homophone: WILD
22. Broadcast about introduction of cigarette lighter (4)
SCOW C(igarette) in SOW[broadcast]
a flat-bottomed boat, hence lighter
23. A single person, out of condition, losing heart (4)
UNIT UN(f)IT
 

9 Responses to “Everyman No. 3470 (7th April)”

  1. crosser says:

    Thanks Lorraine, nice crossword as usual.
    I solved 11d of course but I don’t understand the parsing: I get “time” and “will” but why “tell”?
    I think you’ve forgotten the C (= about) in 3a.

  2. michelle says:

    This was an enjoyable puzzle which gave me a few chuckles. My favourites were CLOCK-WATCHER, SCOW, WELL, VERY, CINDERELLA.

    New words for me were MUNTJAC, SCOW, NOT MUCH COP.

    Thanks for the blog, Lorraine. I think there are two typos in the blog above. For 3a, NOT MUCH COP, you are short of one ‘C’. I parsed it as an anagram of MOUNT + CH (check, as in chess) + C (circa, about) + OP (work). And for 27a, the first ‘E’ should not be in bold type as your answer is VERY (not ‘every’).

  3. michelle says:

    crosser@1

    Sorry, I took too long to type my post and you had already mentioned the missing C in 3a.

    And now that you mention it, I also do not completely understand the parsing of 11d.

  4. Bryan says:

    Many thanks Lorraine & Everyman – well not quite ‘every man’ just the very special one.

    MUNTJAC was a new one for me and now I want one!

    So, I’m now off to the New Forest and, hopefully, I can then also meet my favourite barmaid.

  5. Robi says:

    Thanks Everyman; I thought this was more difficult than normal.

    Thanks Lorraine; in 11d ‘is bound to’= will, ‘take its toll’= tell in the sense of: ‘the strain was beginning to tell on him.’ Difficult but fair construction for CLOCK WATCHER – I thought the ‘bang on time’ was part of the wordplay.

    I particularly liked MUNTJAC and SNOW CHAINS – broadcast often causes problems as an alternative homonym indicator.

  6. John says:

    I don’t get either of the alleged dd’s for WELL (although I suppose ‘I wish you well’ has a hint of fortune to it, but it’s not the right part of speech), and I don’t think ‘weak type’ is a definition of WET BLANKET. I got the answers, but the clues weren’t as good a usual I thought.

  7. HKColin says:

    Thanks Lorraine. This was mostly smooth sailing but I left 16ac because I could not parse WELL. You have it as a cdd but even if it is a dd as John@6 implies I cannot see it. “Very” as a dfinition is fine, as in “well pleased”, but why the “possibly” and how is fortunate a d or cd?

    And to John@6, I parsed 26ac as a charade. Wet = weak type and blanket = complete as in blanket coverage. Killjoy is the definition.

  8. Robi says:

    John @6, HKColin @7; I think this might be: fortunate in well-heeled, well-to-do, well off etc and ‘very possibly’ as in ‘you may well be right.’

  9. HKColin says:

    Thanks Robi. That works for me.

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