Fifteensquared

Never knowingly undersolved.

AZED No. 1,968 Plain

Posted by The Trafites on February 21st, 2010

The Trafites.

Nick:  I am trying a new format here, with the full clue next to the clue number and the solution with word play/comments underneath.  Often when reading other blogs on this site, I would like to read the clue but alas they are sometimes inaccessible.  If it appears too busy, please let me know.

A strange AZED this week with two peculiar clues (35ac and 8dn) that seem almost non-AZEDian in their complexity; perhaps a deliberate respite after last weeks playfair puzzle.  Otherwise we have the normal usual unusual words and unobvious meanings that AZED tends to find to occupy the grid and clue with.

Legend to solution comments:
*  =  anagram.
<  =  word reversed.

Across
1. Drug for river blindness, one that’s jolly uncomfortable etc when injected in vein (10)
IVERMECTIN I + ((RM + (ETC*)) in VEIN)
convoluted wordplay to start
11. Quite bowled over about kiss that’s exciting (4)
SEXY (YES<) around X
12. Novelist’s unique creation: ‘Money bags I make’ (8)
OCHIDORE I DO in OCHRE
a Charles Kingsley ‘non-word’ meaning shore-crab; lovely mislead with
‘money bags I make’, with ‘bags’ here meaning to grab hold/surround of
‘I DO’
13. Thick silky fabric: swindle contains a cheaper one? (6)
CREPON REP in CON
14. ‘Bridge Road’? Place half reduced in recession (4)
ACOL LOCA(tion)<
a bridge (card game) system of bidding named after Acol Road in London, so a double definition as well as word play here
16. Groove cut to receive edge, blunt (6)
REBATE dd
Chambers seems to refer to ‘rabbet’ as the lead word here, but I think
‘rebate’ is more commonly used when referring to a groove in wood etc.
17. Basques in revolutionary cause about autonomous region (7)
EUSCARA AR in (CAUSE*)
18. Stirred cooking pan when half reduced (5)
WOKEN WOK + (wh)EN
20. Delirious US grimalkin’s lost in sweet extract of whey (9, 2 words)
MILK SUGAR (US GRIMALK(in)*)
23. Exercise: reversed spiral turn I do twirling wing-like (9)
PTERYGOID PT + (GYRE<) + (I DO*)
25. Don presenting extract of verse, Norwegian (5)
SENOR hidden;  verSE NORwegian
26. Intimate of Siegfried S. has look around Italian town (7)
LIVORNO LO around IVOR N(ovello)
the reference here is to Siegfried Sassoon, war poet, and his affair with Ivor Novello.  I spent a while searching the war poets for an IVOR (Ivor Gurney is one, and this detracted me for a bit).
BTW, the excellent (and harrowing) film regeneration is worth a watch
28. Observation I put into slip retracted (6)
ESPIAL (I in LAPSE)<
31. Alchemist’s tincture of what might be classified (4)
TOAD TO + (classified) AD
See entry under BUFO in Chambers
32. Lush no longer let out after six? (6)
VIRENT VI + RENT
I spent a while looking for VIVENT here
33. Like many an east end trip, alas, badly organized (8)
TRIAPSAL (TRIP ALAS)*
Is the definition accurate here?  ‘many an east end’ doesn’t really mean ‘having three apses’, I feel
34. Pipe put under water, we hear (4)
DUCT homophone of DUCKED
With my Pompey accent, I had to say this a few times to make it work :)
35. Suffering, like Samson latterly might one suppose? (10)
DISTRESSED DIS TRESSED
This old chestnut with a newish take.  Not like AZED clueing we have come to expect, really
Down
2. Being tart, displays immorality including what’s jure punished (8)
VERJUICE (JURE*) in VICE
3. River requiring constant management (4)
EXEC EXE + C
4. Percy, dissolute knight fixing post in Oxford or Cambridge? (6)
RYPECK (PERCY*) + K
5. An implement no longer used for lifting greens? (5)
MOOLA (A LOOM)<
greens = money = moola.  Great misleading surface reading
6. Chewed rich cigar, suggesting swollen fingers? (9)
CHIRAGRIC (RICH CIGAR)*
7. Channel with a strong current, one with early freshness in Scottish river (7)
TIDEWAY I DEW in TAY
8. Blunt response from Parisian populace to M. Antoinette offering meal? (6)
NOCAKE Punning sort of &lit. clue ref: Marie Antoinette; ‘Nocake’ is a meal made with parched maize, so I guess the starving French may have tried to eat it
9. Bazaar’s ending – going round it discerned tat (4)
GROT R in GOT
10. E.g. deer, despatched, misguided noodle stuffed (10)
SELENODONT (NOODLE*) in SENT
13. Bodice: sewn border I put inside and the rest taken up (10)
CHEMISETTE HEM I SET in (ETC<)
15. Reception rooms for grand French ladies in court – most fell (9)
CRUELLEST RUELLES in CT
See FELL³ in Chambers
19. Controversial artist in the future denied first distinction (8)
EMINENCE (tracey)EMIN + (h)ENCE
The artist Tracey Emin
21. One steamer within another making pounds for the Scots? (7)
STRAMPS TRAMP in SS
22. Voluntary, and più mosso, outstanding (6)
UNPAID (AND PIU)*
mosso = animated, the anagram indicator.  Is ‘outstanding’ superfluous here? Two definitions here, one each end of the clue!
24. Fare accompanied by beans – we were loaded! (6)
GOURDS GO + URDS
Gourds are die, so a cryptic sort of definition
27. Flimsy stuff, paltry, with nothing in it (5)
VOILE O in VILE
29. Rowan sometimes planted amid grass or bracken (4)
SORB hidden:  grasS OR Bracken
30. Going up, applied for divinity (4)
DEUS (SUED)<
sue = to make (an) application, so applied = sued

18 Responses to “AZED No. 1,968 Plain”

  1. Chris says:

    22dn. ‘Outstanding’ is a second definition (as in ‘an outstanding bill’).

    I like this format, with the clues included.

  2. jmac says:

    Much appreciate the new format. It makes it much easier to follow the blog and will prove invaluable for those weeks when I have inadvertently thrown out the newspaper!

  3. Simon G says:

    Thanks Nick. I think this new format is excellent – I hope the your fellow bloggers follow suit…

  4. sidey says:

    I like the format. Good work.

    Many chippies I’ve worked with would create a rebate with a rabbetting plane.

  5. sidey says:

    What I should have said is that they would use both terms

  6. The Trafites says:

    Thanks Chris, #1, I have updated the clue explanation to suit – how I didn’t twig there was two definitions, I don’t know.

    I am glad the new format is popular – it doesn’t take much time really as I copy and paste from the on-line print version, correcting typos on the way (‘Italian’ was spelt ‘Italain’ e.g., but was spelt correctly in the PDF version).

    Nick

  7. Richard Heald says:

    The NOCAKE clue is not an & lit., Nick – ‘meal’ is the defn, the rest of the clue bar ‘offering’ is the wordplay part. Very surprised to see ‘nocake’ appears not to be etymologically related to ‘cake’ at all.

  8. Max says:

    Including the clues is a good idea. The font’s a tad on the small side, though.

    Didn’t have enough time to finish this – busy with other things.

  9. Andrew says:

    Thanks for the blog Nick. I agree that 35ac is a bit weak by Azed’s standards, but I suppose there’s not much scope with a word like DISTRESSED. (DESSERT SID reversed is the other obvious approach, but that’s probably been done to death too.)

    33ac – the definition is “Like many an east end”, which I think is reasonable.

    I think I like your new format – I’m blogging this week’s Azed so I’ll try using it myself.

  10. garble says:

    Another alternative for 35ac – Devil locked in torment.

    Why is the crossword titled “Plain”? I was looking for some additional encoding in the answer grid, without success.

  11. The Trafites says:

    garble, ‘plain’ refers to the standard title of AZED crossword (i.e. a straight cryptic) – the other being the competition puzzle type.

    Nick

  12. Andrew says:

    Nick – not quite: a plain is, as you say, a straight cryptic, but the opposite is a “special” (e.g. Printer’s Devilry, Misprints). A competition puzzle (the first of each month, plus Christmas) where solvers (usually) have to provide a clue, can be either a plain or a special.

  13. Richard Heald says:

    Garble, your alternative to 35 Ac “Devil locked in torment” would have been very nice … except ‘Devil’ doesn’t mean ‘Dis’, and ‘locked’ doesn’t mean ‘tressed’!

  14. Handel says:

    Good work on the new format – much easier to remember which clues were tough to parse this way. I found this an odd puzzle, about two-thirds of it I got very quickly, but the north-east quadrant took me ages to finish off.

  15. liz says:

    Thanks, Nick. I like the format, which is especially useful for the tricky wordplays of Azed. Didn’t quite finish this. I had CRETON at 13ac which messed up 4dn and a few gaps in the NE corner too, including ORCHIDORE.

    Another one of my gaps was ACOL. I was very amused to see the explanation for this in the blog. Many years ago we tried to buy a flat in Acol Road and at that time the street had just the sort of faded West Hampstead gentility you might associate with the development of a bridge bidding system!

    I was also a little surprised at the style of 35ac and was only convinced the answer was right after other clues confirmed it.

  16. bridgesong says:

    Thanks for the blog, Nick, and for experimenting with a new format. If I can cope with the fact that I don’t really understand html, I’ll give it a try next time it’s my turn to blog.

    Like others, I found the northeast corner tough to finish; I should (as a bridge player) have found ACOL a bit sooner than I did, and it’s a word Azed has used before (but with a different clue, of course). I think we’ve seen Tracey Emin before, as well.

  17. Richard Heald says:

    Re 35 Ac: Azed does indulge in these sort of fanciful punning “definitions” from time to time – watch out for telltale phrases such as “might one suppose?”. Indeed, today’s puzzle contains a clue that’s very similar in style to the DISTRESSED one!

  18. Richard Heald says:

    Re 35 Ac: Azed does indulge in these sort of fanciful punning “definitions” from time to time – watch out for telltale phrases such as “might one suppose?”. Indeed, today’s puzzle contains a clue that’s very similar in style to the DISTRESSED one!

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